Why is Monument London important to London?

Why is Monument London important to London?

In the heart of the financial district of London stands a 61 meters, (202 feet) Doric column, simply known as Monument.

Monument London

The Monument is an important landmark in London. It is a permanent reminder to the Great Fire of London in 1666 and the rebuilding of London from its ashes. The Monument was built between 1671 and 1677.

The Doric column, simply known as the Monument, was built between 1671 and 1677 as a reminder of the Great Fire of London 1666 and the rebuilding of the City of London.
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The Doric column, simply known as the Monument, was built between 1671 and 1677 as a reminder of the Great Fire of London 1666 and the rebuilding of the City of London.

The Great Fire of London and Monument

The Great Fire of London was a significant event in London’s history because it destroyed the greater part of the City. The Great Fire brought the City to a standstill, severely damaging thousands of houses and buildings and hundreds of streets. Although the loss of lives was little, the impact of the fire was hugely felt by Londoners.

The only buildings to survive the Great Fire were the Leadenhall Market, the Royal Exchange, the Middle Temple Hall, the Staple Inn and the Guildhall. The source of the fire was a baker’s house in Pudding Lane and it started on Sunday 2nd September 1666 and was extinguished on Wednesday 5th September 1666.

Monument as a landmark

So, in keeping with ancient tradition to mark an event with a landmark, the Doric column was built. It was fascinating to discover that the precise location of the Monument was also a significant factor. It is located at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill. It is 61 metres (202 feet) high which is the exact distance between the baker’s shop in Pudding Lane and the Monument.

Design of the Monument

The column was designed by Dr Robert Hooke with collaboration from Sir Christopher Wren. It is a narrow-spiral stone stairs of 311 steps leading to a viewing platform near the top of the Monument.  The Monument is surmounted by a drum and a copper urn from which flames emerge to symbolise the Great Fire.

The Monument was initially used as a centre for experiments for the Royal Society but this was soon discontinued. Thereafter, the Monument became a point of historic interest as a unique structure.

The viewing platform near the top of the Monument and at the top, a drum and a copper urn from which flames emerge to symbolise the Great Fire of 1666
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The viewing platform near the top of the Monument and at the top, a drum and a copper urn from which flames emerge to symbolise the Great Fire of 1666

Finally…

The Monument is one of the popular “must-see” places in London and it offers a 360 degree spectacular panoramic views across London from the public gallery which is about 160 feet high.

It is inexpensive and is a landmark in London to tick-off your list. I highly recommend it.


Read other posts on London

Travel tips and Useful information on Monument

  • Opening Hours

Summer Opening Hours: April – September 9:30am – 6:00pm daily (last admission 5:30pm)


Winter Opening Hours: October – March 9:30am – 5:30pm daily (last admission 5:00pm)


The Monument is closed from 24 – 26 December.

  • Admission Prices


Adults £4.50
Children (aged 5-15) £2.30
Students (with identification) £3.00
Seniors (aged 60+) £3.00

  • Joint tickets for Tower Bridge Exhibition and the Monument


Adults £11.00
Children (aged 5-15) £5.00
Students (with identification) £7.50

Seniors (aged 60+) £7.50
1 Adult & 2 Children £18.30
2 Adults & 1 Child £23.10
2 Adults & 2 Children £26.50
2 Adults & 3 / 4 Children £30.90
Under 5 FREE

https://www.themonument.org.uk

PLEASE NOTE: The Monument only accepts cash payment, and children under the age of 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

Travelling to Monument:

By tube:

Use Monument Station on the District and Circle lines; or

London Bridge on the Northern and Jubilee lines.

By train: 

Use London Bridge, Fenchurch Street or Tower Gateway DLR stations

By bus: 

Use numbers 17, 521, 21, 43, 133, 141, 48, 149 (all routes go through London Bridge).


Is this post valuable to you in planning your trip to London? If so, let me know in comments below or via Contact Form. I would love to hear from you.

Happy Discovering London!

Georgina xx

January 2021, Update

If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International


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Discover why this Monument in the heart of London's financial district is important & explore, enjoy panaromic views of London's skyline | London's Landmark | Historic London | London Fire | London | Historic Britain | London's Financial District | via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/
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By Georgina

Georgina is a Travel Blogger, Travel Writer, history buff, wine (red) enthusiast and a lover of all cultures. She gave up the corporate race to embrace a more meaningful lifestyle to travel more, to write and to share the very best of her adventures. Georgina has lived in three continents, and now, based at a stone's throw of London, which is her home. She has a special interest to bring the best of Britain to her audiences worldwide. Becoming newer from each travel, Georgina enjoys sharing her travel stories, drawing her readers into her world of boomer adventures while immersing them in the history, culture and food of a region. Together with her own informative, in-depth writing style, practical tips and suggestions on her blog, My Timeless Footsteps, Georgina make travel dreams a reality. She is happiest waking up to the chirpy sounds of the birds or sipping wine over sand in between her toes, while watching the rolling clouds melt into darkness.

3 comments

  1. Thank you so much! I am glad that this blog is useful and inspiring 🙂
    Come back and let us know how your trip went and share your experiences.

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