Verona Arena | A piece of medieval marvel that can’t be missed

Verona Arena | A piece of medieval marvel that can’t be missed

Renowned as a Veronese monument, the Verona Arena (Arena di Verona) is the oldest and the largest open-air amphitheatre in the world. This Roman marvel is impressive from all angles. It was constructed in the 1st century and is one of the best preserved of its kind. It sits in Piazza Bra, dominating the heart of the city. The ancient structure looks spectacular both during the day and at night. It was once used for spectacles of gladiator fighting, now Opera performances takes place in the summer months at dusk. An absolute piece of medieval marvel that can’t be missed when visiting Verona.

You can find its location at the following GPS:

Latitude: 45° 26′ 11.99″ N
Longitude: 10° 59′ 23.39″ E

Come along with me to take a very brief look at its 2000 years of history and discover ways how you can experience this ancient monument in Verona.

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners



Verona Arena: An ancient monument of 2000 years of history

Verona as day trip from Milan
Verona, Italy | photo by georgina_daniel

The 1st century amphitheatre known simply as Arena was built around 30 AD during the reign of Augustus Caesar. During his reign, the city of Verona was part of the Roman Empire’s expansion. Located between Milan and Venice together with its strategic location on the Adige River, Verona was used as a base for controlling the northern territories.

The Roman’s built Verona on an organized grid plan, with two main gates, and surrounded it with defensive walls. Bridges were built across the Adige River but most notable of their creations is an amphitheatre. Just outside of the city walls, an amphitheatre was constructed. Verona Arena.

1 | The Romans and About the Amphitheatre

A reconstruction of an ancient entertainment of warriors fighting in an amphitheatre - Photo by Anatoly Kalmykov, Pixabay
A reconstruction of an ancient entertainment of warriors fighting in an amphitheatre – Photo by Anatoly Kalmykov, Pixabay

In Ancient Rome, an amphitheatre is an important structure. It is a meeting point, where the settlement gathers to watch spectacles of entertainment like a circus, a tournament or festivals. An amphitheatre kept everyone happy. Having one just outside of the city walls meant that lots more people from the neighbouring settlements and cities could come without threatening the peace of the City of Verona.

In its original architecture, the Verona Arena comprised of three tiers of arches at a height of 30 metres. The external dimensions of the structure was 152 x 123 metres. The monument was the third largest Roman amphitheatre at that time, after the Colosseum and Capua. The tiers of the amphitheatre are all made of Veronese marble, pink and white stones sourced from Valpolicella. The Verona Arena is said to have accommodated almost 30,000 spectators for festivals, circus acts, dancing and music. The theatre hosted all kinds of games and tournaments especially equestrian games. Above all, the spectacles that drew most attention were blood sports, notably the gladiator show, where two trained combatants would fight each other to death.

Later, more defense walls were built to protect the city from invaders and the amphitheatre was included inside of its walls. It was a good thing too, as all the surrounding settlements and towns were destroyed while Verona stood firm.

2 | After the Romans (500 – 1000 AD)

The Romans lost power in the 5th century. Verona was then ruled by the Goths, the Lombards and the Vatican until around 1000 AD. Buildings and monuments were added to the city century after century. The City of Verona grew but the Arena did not. Gladiator fighting was banned and the Arena stood empty for centuries.

The unused Arena was pillaged for building materials. The bricks and stones were much needed for building other structures and for Verona’s growth. Largely, the Arena stood as a free source of materials.

3 | Disaster strikes!

Verona Arena | A la Carte Travel Guides
The surviving four arches of the outer wall, Verona Arena

After surviving the screaming, stomping fans, several wars, and as a resource of building materials, the Arena was hit by a massive earthquake. On January 3, 1117 AD an earthquake rated at VII (very strong) on the Mercalli Intensity Scale struck northern Italy and Germany. The outer wall of the Arena was partially destroyed as a result. The surviving wall was later damaged in another earthquake of 1183. Only four arches of the outer wall still remains.



4 | The Scala Family – 13th to 14th century

Following the Battle of Legnano in 1176, Verona gained autonomous status. As a result, the economy boomed and the city attracted many wealthy and prominent families who invested and grew the city. Amongst them, the Scala Family, who ultimately ruled as lords of Verona from the mid 13th century through to 14th century.

With more money flowing in the economy, the Scala’s began using the Arena. It was primarily used as a public trial area, and disputes solved through combat.

5 | Verona Arena in the 15th century

However, the fighting among Verona’s wealthy families brought them all down, making it easy for the Venetian Republic to take over at the start of 15th century. Under the Venetian, new laws were passed making it illegal to vandalize the Arena. During this period, the Arena provided cheap housing for prostitutes who kept the place nice and beautiful.

6 | A market place in the 16th century

In the 16th century, the prostitutes made way for small shops, artisans, blacksmiths, hair-dressers, jewellers and mechanics. The open-air Arena became an open-air market where you could go to get your horses hoofed, buy your wife a necklace or for snacks. Essentially it was a place where you could get all your shopping done at once.

It seems that some arches still housed mechanics and other shops until the mid-20th century.

7 | Napoleon

In 1797, Napoleon took over Verona for the length of the Napoleonic Wars until the Austrians won it in 1815. Napoleon used the Arena for purposes other than culture (concentration camp for prisoners).

8 | The Arena finally finds its purpose – 1822

1822 is known as the year of the first ever Opera performance in the open-air amphitheatre. The Arena lends itself well to opera. Though it’s huge, it has remarkable acoustics – performers do not use microphones!

9 | Opera at Verona Arena – August 10, 1913

Although the opera performances began in the 1800’s the Arena was still mostly unused for almost a century. The first performance that set the start of the Opera Festival at Verona Arena was on August 10, 1913. The first performance of Aida organised by Giovanni Zenatello and Ottone Rovato to commemorate the 100th birthday of Giuseppe Verdi. 

Besides pauses during the First and Second World Wars, the Arena has been hosting summer Opera festivals ever since.

That’s just a brief history of a monument of 2000 years or so.

Verona Arena today

Verona Arena
Verona Arena today

Today, the Verona Arena is located in the historic centre, at the heart of the city in Piazza Bra. There are only two tiers. The Arena floor is also now 2 metres below ground level. The seating area is made up of 44 levels and can hold up to 22,000 spectators. Underneath the tiers, there are galleries, cells and passageways which once served and still do, for the complex operation of the Arena. The galleries, cells and passageways are not accessible to the general public.

The Verona Arena continues to play host to a variety of cultural events. It’s famed annual summer festival of Opera performances (June to September) is well-worth a visit if you could get hold of some tickets. Take a look below.

Verona Arena Opera Festival 2021

Verona Arena
Photo from the official site Arena di Verona

From June 19th to September 4th the Arena Opera Festival 2021 is on stage with five amazing opera titles and many special Night in the spectacular setting of the Verona amphitheatre. Tickets are available from 15th July 2020. Take a look at the program and seat availability at the official website Arena di Verona.

Alternatively, you could purchase an Opera package here. (More on this below)

Pro tip: Verona Arena will be used as the closing ceremony for the 2026 Winter Olympics in Milan and Cortina d’Ampezzo. If you’re a fan of winter sports, this would the perfect opportunity to see a different type of performance at the arena.



Ways to experience this ancient monument of 2000 years of history on its back

This Roman amphitheatre is every bit as impressive as it sounds and you will not be disappointed by its experience. It’s huge, different, medieval with modern adaptations but above all, the walls and passages speak of tales and mysteries which can only be imagined.

inside.verona.arena
inside.verona.arena.2

Inside Verona Arena

There are three ways to experience this piece of medieval marvel:

1 | Arena di Verona Opera Package Ticket

Pick up this opera evening package and enjoy a lovely evening at the open-air amphitheatre where Luciano Pavarotti, Maria Callas, and many other tenors and sopranos from all over the world have had the pleasure of singing and performing. I can only imagine it to be one of the best experiences that one could have.

Simply exchange your voucher at gate 16 of the Arena between 5:45 PM to 8:45 PM (desk Montebaldo) any day that an opera is playing. In your package, you will receive a ticket for the opera, a 1-hour Verona city guide (starting at 6:00 PM), a transport-service ticket, as well as all the assistance you may need for a perfect experience in the city. 

2 | Verona Card

You can purchase a Verona Card for 24 or 48 hours and explore the City at your own pace. The Verona Card gives you skip-the-line priority access to the Verona Arena and other monuments as well. You have unlimited access to the ATV transport system. Personally, I find the Verona Card to be a bargain. You can peruse further of what it offers and buy it here.

3 | Guided Tour of Verona Arena

If you want to learn more about this monument from an expert, then join a guided tour. This guided tour is with a licensed guide and lasts half-an-hour with priority access. Hear about the famous operas and some of the stories that took place behind the walls.

Practical information for when visiting Verona Arena

Spectators with limited mobility or disability can have access to some seats in the stalls or the numbered stone steps at a special rate, along with the person accompanying you. Medical proof is required. Go to this page for a full guide on Spectators with Disabilities.

If your ticket is for a stone step seat, it is best to wear long (trousers) or long skirts to cover your legs, to avoid bruises or discomfort. Bring a cushion along and water/snacks.

Location: Piazza Bra 1, 37121, Verona Italy | Tel: +39 045 800 5151 | Nearest station: Verona Porta Nuova Station

My thoughts…

Verona is known as the City of Opera because of the ancient marvel, Arena. It is one of the most astonishingly preserved monument in the world. While we cannot watch gladiator fights or get the horses hoofed, we can certainly spend hours exploring or just sitting in the gallery to feel how it must have been way back then to witness any of the spectacles.

I sincerely hope that a visit to this medieval marvel will cement a perfect vacation to Verona.


Is this post valuable to you in planning your visit to the Verona Arena? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. Scroll all the way down for more ideas and inspiring travel stories. Subscribe to join us at My Timeless Footsteps to receive all the latest news and events. As always, I am contactable at ggdaniel166@gmail.com for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Have a splendid time exploring Verona Arena!

Georgina xx

If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International


Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Exclusive Newsletter & Never miss on the Latest post

We value your Privacy and will not sell your information to third parties. We will not spam your inbox. You will receive excellent, beautiful and valuable travel related content to your inbox 3-4 times a week. You can Unsubscribe anytime. Learn more on our Privacy Policy here


Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.


Don’t fancy a DIY vacation? Hakuna matata! These guys are great at organising package holidays/vacations – take a look…

Timeless incredible holidays with n the Beach
Jet2Holidays
easyJet Holidays Protection Promise
Best offer on Winter sun and Summers at the beach
10 Valuable benefits of a package holiday

Advertisements


Liked it? Pin me on Pinterest!


I share regular highlights of my adventures with my travel community on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest where I would love for you to join me.


I look forward to connecting with each of you on our favourite social media platform


While we cannot watch gladiator fights or get the horses hoofed, we can certainly spend hours exploring or just sitting in the gallery of the Verona Arena via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/While we cannot watch gladiator fights or get the horses hoofed, we can certainly spend hours exploring or just sitting in the gallery of the Verona Arena via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Milan at a Glance – An overview of what to expect

Milan at a Glance

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

Milan at a glance

Milan at a glance is a quick overview of what to expect and what you need to know when visiting this iconic city. It is one of the most travelled cities in Europe and a magnificent destination. You can spend hours or days getting lost here. .

There are so many highlights in this beautiful city, from the cobblestones of Brera to the skyscrapers of Porta Nuova to the historic Gothic architecture of the Duomo and the castles that tells the stories of Milan’s past. It is easy to get around, no matter where you are in the city and can easily getaway to other cities such as the picturesque Cinque Terre, the City of canals or the enchanting lakes of Italy. So, if you are planning a visit to this fabulous City of fashion, here’s what you can expect and need to know:

  • Entry to Italy – Visa: If you are a national of EU/EEA, you can travel with just an Identification card. If you are non EU/EEA, you will need an entry visa. Learn more from this page. With Brexit, UK nationals do not need a visa to enter Italy. Rules on travel will stay the same until 31st December 2020.
  • Language: The official language spoken in Milan is Italian but the majority of Milanese speak Milanese, a dialect of Italians commonly spoken in the Lombardy region.
  • Currency: The currency in Italy is the Euro (€). 1 Pound Sterling (£) is equivalent to 1.15 Euro | 1 USD (US$) is equivalent to 0.93 Euro | Check latest currency exchange before you go.
  • Credit Cards and ATMs: In Milan, there are no problems in finding ATMs /cash machines that accept foreign credit cards or bank debitcards. Most shops, restaurants, and tour operators will also take credit cards as a form of payment. You only really need cash for small purchases like metro tickets, bottles of water, coffee, gelato and small souvenirs etc.
  • Power Plugs: The plugs & sockets in Italy are Type F and L. The standard voltage is 230 V, and the standard frequency is 50Hz. I recommend buying a worldwide universal travel adapter which you can use in any European countries.
  • WiFi – WiFi is usually available at the hotels and the high-rated restaurants but there may be a need to have WiFi at all times (like me). I recommend subscribing to Unlimited Portable Pocket Wifi (my favourite and a must have) when travelling to Milan or wider Italy/Europe. Works out much cheaper than roaming charges by a mobile carrier.
  • Safety – While Milan is generally a safe place to be, you may want to keep a close eye on your belongings. There are always that elements of pickpockets and theft.
  • Getting around – Milan has an awesome transport system that connects all the landmarks so it is easy to navigate. You can find all the information on Getting around Milan like a local on this page. I loved travelling to other cities on day trip by train. The countryside is beautiful and Italy has excellent high-speed routes. Have a look at this page

I hope this overview has given you a taster of what to expect when visiting Italy. Browse through all related articles so you can make an informed decision and know before you go. Milan is a fabulous city and you really got to experience it at least once.


Is this post, Milan at a glance valuable to you in planning your visits to the City of Milan? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. Scroll all the way down for more ideas and inspiring travel stories. Subscribe to join us at My Timeless Footsteps to receive all the latest news and events. As always, I am contactable at ggdaniel166@gmail.com for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Have a splendid time discovering Milan!

Georgina

#staysafe #stayinspired #travelwhensafe


Pin me on Pinterest

Pin on Milan at a glance
Pin on Milan at a glance

Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Newsletter & Never miss a Post!


Can’t find what you are looking for? Use the search form below and search mytimelessfootsteps


My essential kit when I travel




Book your trip to Milan


Join our tribe @mytimelessfootsteps

Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Newsletter & Never miss a Post!

I share regular highlights of my adventures with my travel community on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest where I would love for you to join me.


I look forward to connecting with each of you


Published
Categorised as Italy, Milan

Italy Tourist Travel Visa | A simple overview

Italy Tourist Travel Visa | A simple overview

Italy, a country in Europe and a Member State of European Union/European Economic Area is home to many architectural styles that spans almost 3,000 years. It has a long Mediterranean coastline of 7,600 kilometres, picturesque lakes, stunning cliffs, hidden cities and so much more that makes this country a popular tourist destination. If you want to visit Italy solely for a vacation, recreation, experiencing the country and its culture or sightseeing, then you may need a Italy tourist travel visa.

Pin on Italy tourist travel visa

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

Who may need an Italy Tourist Travel Visa? – Who does and who does not need one?

1 | Who does not need an entry or a tourist visa to visit Italy?

As a Member State of the EU/EEA, Italy “allows for free movement of goods, capital, services and people between member states”. This means that there are no border checks and fulfilment of visa requirements for Member State nationals. – therefore, if you are a national of any of the 27 countries of the EU/EEA, you do not need an entry visa or a tourist travel visa.

The following are the Member States of the European Union (EU):

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden.

The European Economic Area (EEA):

The EEA includes EU countries and also Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. It allows them to be part of the EU’s single market.

Switzerland is not an EU or EEA member but is part of the single market. This means Swiss nationals have the same rights to travel to, live and work in any of the EEA countries.

In essence, all EU/EEA nationals will only need to present an identification document to enter Italy.

For non EU/EEA nationals, here’s what you need to know about Italy tourist and visitor travel visa.

2 | Italy Tourist Travel Visa

All non-EU/EEA traveller wishing to travel to Italy for the sole purpose of a vacation, recreation, experiencing the country and its culture or sightseeing, may need a Italy tourist travel visa.

To apply for a tourist travel visa, you need to contact the local consular services of Italy in your country of residence.

When you seek entry as a tourist, you may need to present the following items at the Italian port of entry:

  • A valid passport or travel document – Your passport issued in the last 10 years and has a validity for at least 3 months beyond your planned date of exit of Italy;
  • A visa issued by the local consular services of Italy in your country of residence – if you are required to have one by the Italian government.
  • Proof of financial means to support yourself and your dependants when travelling;
  • An address at which you would be located during your trip;
  • A detailed trip itinerary;
  • A round trip ticket.

*British passport holders are exempt from the criteria of passport validity and issuance date. (Learn more from UK government official website here)

3 | Italy Visitor Travel Visa

When travelling to Italy upon the invitation of a friend or a family member residing in Italy, you will need to hold an Italy Visitor visa. With a visitor visa, you are permitted to enter and remain in Italy for up to 90 days within a 6-month period.

To apply for a visitor travel visa, you need to contact the local consular services of Italy in your country of residence.

When applying to obtain a visa to visit your friends or relatives in Italy, you are required to provide the following additional documents:

  • Proof of financial means. Evidence that shows you have enough money to support yourself throughout your stay in Italy. This could be a personal bank statements, credit card statements or balance covering the last six months;
  • Sponsorship Letter. This is required when another person will be financially sponsoring your trip to Italy. It is also often called an Affidavit of Support.
  • Travel Itinerary. A day-to-day plan of your trip in Italy.
  • Letter of Invitation. By the relative/friend residing in Italy, inviting you to visit.
  • Proof of relationship with the host residing in Italy.

For rules, instructions, all questions, answers and up-to-date information for foreigners intending to visit Italy, visit the official page of the Italian Consular service here.

San Marino & Vatican City

Although San Marino and Vatican City are independent countries within Italy, both countries did not sign the Schengen agreement. However, San Marino and Vatican City are considered part of the Schengen area. If you have a visa to visit Italy, you are not required to obtain a specific visa for San Marino or Vatican. You can travel freely to either of these micro-states as no border control is performed when entering from Italy.

Learn more about the Schengen Agreement from the official page of the EU here.

Finally…

While this post is a simple and quick overview, I hope it has given you an idea of whether you need to explore the possibility of obtaining a tourist travel visa for when you visit Italy. The simple list above of what you may need to show at the port of entry represents concisely the information required to obtain your visa. The following links which I have already referred to above, will provide you with all the information you need to make a successful tourist visa application.

Italian Consular services | The Schengen Agreement/Visa | British Nationals – Learn more from this page


Is this post on Italy tourist travel visa valuable to you to support your Italy tourist travel visa application? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. Scroll all the way down for more ideas and inspiring travel stories. Subscribe to join us at My Timeless Footsteps to receive all the latest news and events. As always, I am contactable at ggdaniel166@gmail.com for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Happy travels 🙂

Georgina

Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Exclusive Newsletter & Never miss on the Latest post

We value your Privacy and will not sell your information to third parties. We will not spam your inbox. You will receive excellent, beautiful and valuable travel related content to your inbox 3-4 times a week. You can Unsubscribe anytime. Learn more on our Privacy Policy here


Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.



I share regular highlights of my adventures with my travel community on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest where I would love for you to join me.


I look forward to connecting with each of you


A quick and simple overview on what you need to know about Italy tourist travel visa and visitor visa to Italy plus who does not need one. #travel #italy #europe via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/A quick and simple overview on what you need to know about Italy tourist travel visa and visitor visa to Italy plus who does not need one. #travel #italy #europe via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Milan Centrale Station | An Overview

Milan Centrale Station | An Overview

Milan Centrale Station is no ordinary Station, for sure! Its imposing, grandiose architecture has sculptures of winged horses, lions, bulls and eagles adorning its roof. Not only is it one of Europe’s largest stations, it depicts various architectural styles and art deco. The only thing you must not forget to do is to Look Up! Here is an overview.

About this post on Milan Centrale Station

This post provides a quick overview on Milan’s and one of Europe’s largest train station which is an attraction in itself. An architectural masterpiece showcasing various styles, it is a reflection of the grand city as a center of commerce and fashion. In addition, the station is home to a dedicated memorial as well as many restaurants and high-end fashion stores. There are practical information included for travellers using this station.

You can find this station located at: 45.4870° N, 9.2055° E

Milan Centrale Station

Milan Centrale Station, Milan. @mytimelessfootsteps

Milan Centrale Station is the main train station for Milan, a city that is the centre of commerce and fashion in northern Italy. It was opened in 1931, replacing an older and smaller station that was built in 1864. The station showcases an imposing, grandiose design to reflect the dominance of the then fascist regime of Prime Minister of Italy, Benito Mussolini. Milan Centrale Station is the second largest station in Italy, following Roma Termini.

The Station is centrally located in Milan, giving easy access to Milan’s top attractions, such as the Piazza del Duomo, Duomo di Milano, the Brera District and the many museums located around the city. The Station itself is home to high-end designer shopping which the City, as one of the fashion capital of the world is popularly known for.

Architectural design

Milan Centrale Station
Milan Centrale Station | mytimelessfootsteps

“They told me that when Frank Lloyd Wright came to Milan, and he came only once, he was really impressed by it and said it was the most beautiful station in the world. For me it is also more beautiful than Grand Central Station in New York. I know few stations like this one”.

Aldo Rossi declared in an interview of February 1995 to Cecilia Bolognesi (Aldo Rossi, Luoghi Urbani, Unicopli 1999, p. 31)

There are no definite architectural style that can be associated with this grand station. Though beautiful and adorned with sculptures of winged horses, lions, bulls and eagles, it appears to be a blend of many different styles of Art Deco and Liberty, but not limited to those.

The platforms are covered with a canopy of soaring glass and metal arched roof, which is 341 metres (1,119 ft) long. It covers a total area of 66,500 square metres (716,000 sq feet).  

As I mentioned earlier, don’t forget to look up – this is a magnificent building.

A sad past and The Shoah Memorial of Milan

During the holocaust in Italy, the station played a key role in transporting Jewish inmates of the San Vittore Prison and other persecuted people to concentration or death camps. They were taken to a secret track, located deep, on a sub-level below the train tracks, Binario 21. Between 1943 and early 1945, a total of twenty deportation trains and prisoners were sent away from here.

Today, this part of the station is a place for memory, gathering and awareness.

The Shoah Memorial of Milan

The Shoah Memorial of Milan occupies a vast space of train yard underneath the Centrale Station. Covering an area of twenty-four parallel tracks which were originally used for mail wagons, it is laid out on two levels, the ground floor and mezzzanine floor.


An overview for travellers using Milan Centrale Station

There are twenty-four platforms at Milan Centrale Station, with daily service to cities throughout Italy and Europe. It serves about 320,000 people each day.

The platforms and concourse are above ground level but these are fully accessible from ground level via lifts and escalators. Thus, providing level access to all platforms and concourse.

If you are without or with manageable luggage, you may want to walk-up the grand staircase from the station’s main entrance on the Piazza Duca d’Aosta.

Milano Centrale Station - 1
One of the grand staircases at Milan Centrale Station, accessed from Piazza Duca d’Aosta

Practical information to support your travel when at Milan Centrale Station

The station has free WiFi. 

On platform level, there is an information office and a few shops and restaurants. There are restrooms near platform 22.

Executive class & Business Salottino passengers on its Frecciarossa trains have access to Sala Freccia Club located near platform 21.

Passengers with disabilities who need special assistance have access to Sala Blu, located near platform 4.

On ground level, there is a large ticket office, the KiPoint left luggage facility, a post office, shops and restaurants.

Currency exchange is on platform level – Hours: 7:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.

1 | Connections to Airports from Milan Centrale Station

i | To Malpensa Airport

The most convenient way is to use the bus transfer from Centrale to Malpensa or Malpensa to Centrale.

Malpensa Shuttle | Departs every 20 minutes | Journey is 1 hour

ii | To Linate International Airport

Book a ticket for a hassle free journey onboard an airport bus transfer from Linate Airport to Milan Central Station and from Milan Centrale to Linate Airport. This transfer assures a direct connection between Linate Airport and Milan Central Station by providing buses from the early morning until late at night. Get you and your luggage where you need to go when you need to go.

Bus | Departs every 30 minutes | Journey is 25 minutes | From 5:30 a.m.

iii | To other railway stations from Milan Centrale

Metro: local subway – MM1(red) | MM2(green) | MM3(yellow)

2 | Train services at Centrale

Le Frecce | Thello | City Night Train

3 | Cities commonly travelled to from Milan Centrale Station:

Basel | Florence | Geneva | Lugano | Lucerne | Nice | Paris | Rome | Venice | Zurich


4 | Getting to Milan City Centre | Piazza del Duomo from Centrale

From Milan Centrale Station:

To get to the Cathedral, you will need the Piazza del Duomo. The distance between Milan’s Central Station and Piazza del Duomo is 2 miles / 3.2 km. There are Three ways to get to Milan Cathedral from Central Station. I took a taxi and it was 10 Euros. Have a look at the following and you can decide what suits you.

The quickest way to get from Milan’s Central Station to Piazza del Duomo is to take a taxi. It takes 7 to 10 minutes depending on traffic. It costs around 10 Euros.

If you are considering the cheapest way to get from Milan’s Central Station to Piazza del Duomo, then it is the line 3 subway which costs 3 Euros and takes 15 min. It is located right in the Piazza del Duomo.

You can take a direct bus departing from Central Station m2 m3 and arrives at via larga. It is about 7 to 9 minutes walk to Piazza del Duomo, The bus services depart every two hours, and operate every day. The journey takes approximately 13 min. Costs 3 Euros.

Learn more from this page that tells you all about getting around Milan like a local using public transport

Station location

Address: Piazza Duca d’Aosta, 1 20124 Milan | GPS: 45.4870° N, 9.2055° E


Places to stay in Milan

Millennium Hotels & Resorts, Milan, IT

Radisson Blu Hotel, Milan, IT

For more choices on accommodation, use this link and check on the vast choices available in Milan – Accommodation in Milan


Consider these activities when visiting Milan


Learn more from these related articles

Milan in one day | Parco Sempione
Bucket List | Milan | Parco Sempione

My thoughts…

If you train travel to Milan or if you ever find your self at Milan Centrale Station, take a moment to look around. This magnificent, awe-inspiring station building is no ordinary station and it is indeed an attraction in itself!


Is this post valuable to you when at Milan Centrale Station? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. Scroll all the way down for more ideas and inspiring travel stories. Subscribe to join us at My Timeless Footsteps to receive all the latest news and events. As always, I am contactable at ggdaniel166@gmail.com for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Have an awesome time exploring Milan.

Georgina

Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Exclusive Newsletter & Never miss on the Latest post

We value your Privacy and will not sell your information to third parties. We will not spam your inbox. You will receive excellent, beautiful and valuable travel related content to your inbox 3-4 times a week. You can Unsubscribe anytime. Learn more on our Privacy Policy here


Latest posts

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.


Explore Train Travel in Europe


Stay at the Millennium


Stay at Radisson



Pin me on Pinterest!
Milan Centrale Station

Look forward to connecting with each of you


A quick overview to Milan Centrale Station. If you ever find your self here, take a moment to look around. This magnificent, awe-inspiring station building is no ordinary station! via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/A quick overview to Milan Centrale Station. If you ever find your self here, take a moment to look around. This magnificent, awe-inspiring station building is no ordinary station! via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Arco della Pace | An unmissable monument in Milan

Arco della Pace | An unmissable monument in Milan

Arco della Pace or the Arch of Peace is an elegant Neoclassical architecture and a symbol of Milan. It stands at Porta Sempione, one of the five oldest of the City’s gates. This symbolic monument is surrounded by the largest lush green oasis of this fashion capital, Parco Sempione, which is a popular tourist attraction in itself. The area is freely accessible and the Arco della Pace is an unmissable attraction when visiting Milan.

Pin on Arco della Pace

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

History of Arco della Pace

Arco della Pace, Milan by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

Designed by architect Luigi Cagnola in 1807, it echoes Paris’ Arc de Triomphe. It was originally named Arco delle Vittorie (Arch of Victory) to celebrate Napoleon’s victory. The Arch is built at the start of Corso Sempione, a road that connects Milan to Paris along the Simplon Pass. This meant that Napoleon would pass through the Arch on his way into the Italian city. However, with Napoleon’s fall in 1814, this Neoclassical facade was left unfinished.

Post-Napoleonic era, the Arch was renamed Arco della Pace in 1815. Work resumed in 1826 and completed in 1838, in time for the crowning of Ferdinand I as King of Lombardy-Veneto. Ferdinan I dedicated the Arch to Francis I. Later, and with another change of power in 1859, the Arch was rededicated to the unified Italy. Sadly, Luigi Cagnola died in 1833, not having witnessed the completion of the Arch.

The architecture of Arco della Pace

A closer look at the Arch of Peace, Milan, Italy by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

The design of Arco della Pace is similar to the Arch of Septimius Severus at the Forum Romanum in Rome. It features a large passageway along with four Corinthian columns, decorated with bas-reliefs and sculptures. At 23 metres, this monument was built using several materials, including the Baveno granite and Creola d’Ossola marble.

At the top of the Arch, there are three groups of bronze statues. The central one is of a Goddess led by six-horses – the Chariot of Peace, sculpted by Abbondio Sangiorgio. The statues on either side of the arch were created by Giovanni Putti and are known as the Victories on Horseback. The sculptures were intended to face Paris but their position was modified by the Hapsburgs after Napolean’s defeat. The horses were turned 180 degrees to face the City.

Just below the statue, in the four corners of the columns are representations of the four rivers that flow through the former kingdom of Lombardy-Veneto region – Po, Ticino, Adige and Tagliamento. Bas-reliefs along the sides of the monument depict scenes of Battle of Leipzig which led to Napoleon’s defeat rather than his military victories. Other bas-reliefs depict major events in Italian history.


Practical information to support your visit:

1 | Location of Arco della Pace

If you are accessing Arco della Pace via Sforzesco Castle, then it is located at the far end of Parco Sempione. Parco Sempione can be accessed at the rear of the Castle. With so many attractions in Parco Sempione, this map shows you where exactly you need to head to.

Location of Arco della Pace in Sempione Park


2 | How to get to the Arch of Peace

Attractions in Milan are all located within walking distance. If you decide to use public transport, then the following might be helpful. The starting point is from Piazza del Duomo, the central square and the meeting point for most in Milan.

Take Line 1 Subway | the Line 1 Tram

This journey involves a 6-minute transfer

From the Duomo, take the Metro (M1) to Cadorna Fn . Journey is 3 minutes and costs 2 Euros.

At Cadorna, change to Tram 1. A 8-minute journey to Arco della Pace and costs 2 Euros.

Take Line 1 Tram

From the Duomo Metro Station, walk to Cordusio M1 – about 4 minutes.

Board Tram 1 to Arco della Pace. Journey is about 20 minutes, costs 2 Euros

Alternatively, you can take a taxi which costs around 8 Euros.


3 | Explore nearby areas


4 | Consider joining a tour of the City

When visiting Milan, consider joining a tour or two to learn about the history of the City. If you are a foodie, join a food tour so you get to experience the authentic Milanese restaurants that only the local experts know. If time permits, get away from the City for a day and experience the Lake Districts or the mountains or better still, visit a neighbour!


5 | Stay informed with related articles

Getting around Milan like a Local
Bucket List | Milan | Parco Sempione

Is this post valuable to you in planning your visits to the Arch of Peace? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. Scroll all the way down for more ideas and inspiring travel stories. Subscribe to join us at My Timeless Footsteps to receive all the latest news and events. As always, I am contactable at ggdaniel166@gmail.com for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Have an awesome time exploring the City of Milan.

Georgina

If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International


Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Exclusive Newsletter & Never miss on the Latest post

We value your Privacy and will not sell your information to third parties. We will not spam your inbox. You will receive excellent, beautiful and valuable travel related content to your inbox 3-4 times a week. You can Unsubscribe anytime. Learn more on our Privacy Policy here


Latest Articles

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.


Explore Train Travel in Europe



I share regular highlights of my adventures with my travel community on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest where I would love for you to join me.


Pin me on Pinterest!

Pin on Arco della Pace

Look forward to connecting with each of you


Arco della Pace, an exquisite landmark of Milan is surrounded by the lush oasis of Sempione Park. An unmissable monument which is also freely accessible. via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/Arco della Pace, an exquisite landmark of Milan is surrounded by the lush oasis of Sempione Park. An unmissable monument which is also freely accessible. via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Parco Sempione (Milan) | 5 must-see attractions

Parco Sempione (Milan) | 5 must-see attractions

Parco Sempione is the largest green space in the city of Milan. It is located at the rear of Sforzesca Castle, in the northwest of the city. Covering an area of about 95 acres (38 hectares), it is a perfect haven to relax, to walk, jog, to bike ride or just about anything you wish, to fly away the time. The shaded area, sculptures and ornate fountains are especially inviting. Flora and fauna abound here as is the tranquillity in some areas where it is not crowded. This peaceful haven is popular amongst tourists as well as Milanese who seek respite from their hectic city life.

Parco Sempione, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

First established in 1888, the park was used as a hunting ground by the Sforza family, the Dukes of Milan. Then it was landscaped when Napolean came, with a few orchards. In 1891, a large park was constructed for the public. Today, Parco Sempione has a number of attractions on site which should not be missed when you are visiting this peaceful and tranquil haven. There are 5 attractions which are made up of the Sforza Castle, Arch of Peace, an aquarium, a sporting arena, and Torre Branca, one of the tallest tower in Milan.

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

1 | Sforza Castle in Parco Sempione

Sforzesco Castle, Parco Sempione, Milan by Dimitris Vetsikas

Sforza Castle is a landmark in Milan. An impressive red brick fortress which was initially built in the 14th century by the Visconti family. The Castle was almost destroyed during the Golden Ambrosian Republic. It underwent massive improvements and reconstruction later in the 15th century when the Sforza family became the Dukes of Milan, to be one of the largest palaces in Europe. Today, Sforza Castle is home to several museums that houses valuable art and masterpieces. Notably, Michelangelo’s unfinished last work, the Rondanini Pietà and Sala delle Asse, frescoes by Da Vinci.

Address: Piazza Castello, 20121 Milano MI, Italy | Hours: Tue – Sun 09:00 – 17:30


2 | Arco della Pace

Arco della Pace, Parco Sempione, Milan by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

The Arco della Pace (Arch of Peace) is a symbol of Milan and marks one of the historic gates. This was the strategic route taken by Napoleon when he invaded Northern Italy. This triumphal monument, is a beautiful structure made of marble and was completed in 1838. Standing at 23 metres and topped with horse-drawn chariots. is a landmark not to be missed when visiting Milan.

Address: Piazza Sempione, 20154 Milano MI, Italy


3 | Arena Civica

Also in Parco Sempione, there is Arena Civica which is one of Milan’s most popular sporting venues. The official name is Arena Gianni Brera, named after the famous Italian writer and journalist. Designed by Luigi Canonica, the Arena Civica was Napolean’s mini-colosseum which he opened with a chariot race in 1807. This Neoclassical stadium hosts major sporting events such as soccer, rugby games and concerts. The Arena is open daily to the public.

It is quite a plain stadium but the entrance looked okay.

Address: Viale Giorgio Byron, 2, 20154 Milano MI, Italy


4 | Acquario Civico in Parco Sempione

The Acquario Civico di Milano (Civic Aquarium of Milan) is tucked away in a convenient corner of Parco Sempione. Opened in 1906, it is beautiful. but a rather small aquarium. Home to over one-hundred species of fish, it tells a story of the mountain streams to seabeds. The are video presentations on the rare species.

The Acquario Civico is open to the public every day except Monday. Entrance is free.

Address: Viale Gadio, 2, 20121 Milano MI, Italy


5 | Torre Branca

Torre Branca is no ordinary tower!. It is narrow and made completely of steel. At 108.6 metres, Torre Branca is one the City’s tallest buildings. The Tower was designed by Gio Ponti and erected in just two-and-half months in time for the 5th Triennale exhibition in 1933.

Take the elevator to the top, step out to see the incredible views over the City of Milan, the skyscrapers both old and new as well as the snow-capped mountains in the distance.

Opening times varies:

On mid April-mid October: 

Tues and Thurs 9.30pm-midnight | Wed 10.30am-12.30pm/4pm-6.30pm/9.30pm-midnight | Fri 2.30pm-6pm/9.30pm-midnight | Sat and Sun 10.30am-12.30am/2.30pm-7.30pm/9.30pm-midnight. 


On mid October-mid April: 

Wed 10.30am-12.30am/4pm-6.30pm | Sat 10.30am-1pm/3pm-6.30pm/8.30-midnight | Sun 10.30am-2pm/2.30pm-7pm.


Full ticket €5.

NB: The Torre Branca is closed for visits in case of bad weather.

Torre Branca
Parco Sempione, viale Milton
M1-M2 Cadorna FN
T:+39.02.3314120


Practical information when visiting Parco Sempione

1. Map of Parco Sempione

To support your visit to the Park, below is a map of Parco Sempione in Milan with markers for the 5 attractions I have listed on this post.


2. Plan ahead

When visiting Milan, consider joining a couple of city guided tours to enhance your experiences. There are hundreds of unmissable activities in Milan for all ages and interests. Plan ahead and secure your ticket/s especially if you are planning on visiting “The Last Supper” at the Santa Maria delle Grazie. Pre-book your tickets and stay flexible with easy cancellation up to 24 hours before. Save time, avoid queues and purchase skip the line tickets for major attractions. The following may be of interest to you:


3 | Read related articles

The following are some articles on Milan that may support your visit to the City:

Getting around Milan like a Local
Bucket List | Milan | Parco Sempione
Milan in one  day | Parco Sempione

So, what do you think? Is this post valuable to you in planning your visit to Parco Sempione? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. As always, I am contactable for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Have a splendid time exploring Parco Sempione.

Georgina

Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Exclusive Newsletter & Never miss on the Latest post

We value your Privacy and will not sell your information to third parties. We will not spam your inbox. You will receive excellent, beautiful and valuable travel related content to your inbox 3-4 times a week. You can Unsubscribe anytime. Learn more on our Privacy Policy here



Pin me on Pinterest!
Pin on Sempione Park, Milan
Pin on Parco Sempione

I look forward to connecting with each of you


Parco Sempione is the largest green space in Milan. A public park since 1891, this oasis of natural habitat is home to 5 "must see" attractions.  This is a quick read for now to #travel later via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/Parco Sempione is the largest green space in Milan. A public park since 1891, this oasis of natural habitat is home to 5 "must see" attractions.  This is a quick read for now to #travel later via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Sforza Castle and Museums | Castello Sforzesco | Milan

Sforza Castle and Museums | Castello Sforzesco | Milan

Sforza Castle and Museums is an oasis of art and culture. This iconic destination is one of the landmarks in Milan. A favourite for visitors, it is home to some of the best museums that tells the stories of the city’s past. Although I couldn’t visit the museums during my recent visit to Milan, it is on my bucket list to do so on my next visit. The grounds were splendid, of which I am glad to have visited. Whether you visit this fashion capital for a day, or a few days, Sforza Castle should be on your list. I share what I have learnt of this magnificent Castle, both from research and from my personal experience. You will find Sforza Castle in Milan at:

45.4705° N, 9.1793° E

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

Sforza Castle
The Torre del Filarete (central tower), Sforza Castle, Milan by Dimitris Vetsikas of Pixabay

Why and When was Sforza Castle built

This iconic red brick fortress was built in the 14th century by the Visconti family who made it into a splendid palace. It was almost destroyed during the Golden Ambrosian Republic. Later, in the 15th century, it became the home of the Sforza family, who were powerful rulers of Milan. Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan built on the remnants of the 14th fortification. The castle was reconstructed with the involvement of several of the greatest artists of the times such as Donato Bramante and Leonardo da Vinci. It was one of the most magnificent residences in Italy as a result. During the 16th and 17th centuries, Sforza Castle was renovated and enlarged to be one of the largest castles in Europe.

During the next four centuries, the castle was dominated by foreign powers, French, Spanish, Austrian. The function changed as well, from a residence to a military complex. It was later used as barracks by the Italian army.

In 1905 the castle was completely restored to the way it was under the Sforza family by architect Luca Beltrami. The parade grounds at the rear of the castle was turned into a park.

Post restoration

During World War II, the castle was severely damaged. At the end of the twentieth century the Castle square was built with a fountain in the centre. In 2005, the restoration of the Cortile della Ghirlanda and the halls of the castle were completed.

Sforza Castle

The Sforza Castle is of a square plan, with three inner courtyards dominated by four imposing towers on each corner. There are two round towers facing the city and two square towers at the other end. The round towers are known as the Torre di Santi Spirito and the Torre del Carmine. At the rear are two more towers, the Torre Castellana and Torre Falconiera.


The main entrance to the Sforzesco Castle is via the castle’s tallest tower, Torre del Filarete. It leads to an expansive inner courtyard. Exploring the castle grounds will bring you to the Torre di Bona di Savoia. Beyond this tower lies two smaller courtyards, the Cortile della Rocchetta to the left and the Corte Ducale to the right.

The Rocchetta was the castle’s stronghold and the last refuge in case of a siege.

Castello Sforzesco
Corte Ducale, Sforzesco Castle, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

The Corte Ducale (Ducal Courtyard) is elegantly designed in Renaissance style with a beautiful loggia, Loggetta di Galeazzo Maria. Some of the rooms around the Corte Ducale are decorated with magnificent frescoes from the fifteenth century, designed by Leonardo da Vinci.

Sforza Castle today | An oasis of art & culture

Sforzesco Castle, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

The building alone is well worth a visit but within the walls of Sforza Castle is home to some treasure trove of Milan history.

The Museums at Sforza Castle

The Castle houses several distinct museums bringing together art, paintings, sculptors and musical instruments that tells the stories upon stories of Milan’s cultural and civic history. Watch the virtual tours through the links below, courtesy of Google Arts & Culture, and you will discover, as I, just how fascinating these museums are.

The highlights of the Museums are:

1 | Rondanini Pietà Museum

This museum features Michelangelo’s final and unfinished work, the Rondanini Pietà, now housed in the frescoed hall of the castle’s Ospedale Spagnolo (Spanish Hospital).

Michelangelo continued to work on this sculpture up until the last days before his death in Rome in 1564. It was just a few weeks before what would have been his 89th birthday.

Carved from a single block of marble, the sculpture depicting the Virgin Mary grieving over the body of Christ stands to a height of 74 inches.

Sforza Castle - Rondanini Pieta
Image from Google Arts & Culture

2 | The Museum of Ancient Art

The Museum of Ancient Art houses the Sforza family’s sculptures of great value from the 5th century to the 16th century.

3 | The Pinacoteca

The Pinacoteca (Picture Gallery) hosts Lombard, Venetian and Flemish works. Made up of over 1500 works of art between the 13th and 18th century, it includes famous names such as Canaletto, Mantegna, Bronzino, Lorenzo Lotto, and Titian.

Sforza Castle - Pinacoteca
Image from the official website of Pinacoteca Museum, Sforza Castle (View of Room 21)

4 | Museum of Musical Instruments

Displays musical instruments from all over the world and is one of the most important museums in the world.

5 | The Antique Furniture and Wooden Sculpture Museum

This part of the museum features antiques dating from the 15th to 20th centuries. The furniture are displayed in various rooms representing respective periods.

6 | Museum of Decorative Arts

The museum shows the work of pottery makers, sculptors, upholsterers and weavers.

7 | Sala delle Asse

This part of the the museum is frescoed by Leonardo da Vinci,

8 | Egyptian Museum

Houses several objects from Egypt including statues, and mummies.

9 | The Archaeological Museum of Milan

This museum is home to objects from the main cultures that lived in Lombardy from the Neolithic period.

There are couple more exhibitions such as the Medal & Numistica Collection, and the engraving collection, “Achille Bertarelli”.


Practical information for visiting Sforza Castle, Milan

Hours and Admission

Opening hours

Castle
Monday-Sunday   7.00-19.30

Museums
Tuesday-Sunday  9.00-17.30      Last admission 17.00 (only for ticket holders)

Closed on Mondays, December 25th, January 1st, May 1st

Free entry to Sforza Castle

The Castle’s central courtyard is free at all times. It is Free entry to the museums on every first and third Tuesday of the month from 14.00

How to get to Sforza Castle

Location: Sforzesco Castle, Piazza Castello, 20121 Milan

On public transport

M1 and M2 (red and green lines) Cadorna FN
M1 (red line) Cairoli
M2 (green line) Lanza

For a comprehensive guide to using the public transport in Milan, read this article that has all the information you need. Includes type of tickets you may require, costs and links to the official ATM websites.

Other info:

Tel: +39 02.88463700 | www.milanocastello.it

Accessibility

While most of the rooms are accessible to the disabled, rooms 9, 10, 15, 23, 24 are not accessible.


My thoughts on Sforza Castle

Sforzesco Castle, is not only a castle full of art but is also huge and beautifully landscaped with central courtyards that beckons a visit when you are in Milan. If you do not have time for the museums, visit this castle courtyards as it is open to the public and it is free. Moreover, Parco Sempione, Milan’s largest public green space is located at the rear of this magnificent landmark, so a visit through the courtyard is highly recommended if you are visiting Sempione Park.

If you are planning on visiting the museums, then consider doing one of the tours offered by Get your Guide, a trusted partner. View choices here.

You may also like to have a read on these, so you know more of Milan before your visit.

Graphic on Milan Bucket List
Graphic on Day trip from Milan
Milan in one day

So, what do you think? Is this post valuable to you in planning your visit to Sforza Castle? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. As always, I am contactable for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Enjoy the beautiful city of Milan.

Georgina xx

If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International


Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Exclusive Newsletter & Never miss on the Latest post

We value your Privacy and will not sell your information to third parties. We will not spam your inbox. You will receive excellent, beautiful and valuable travel related content to your inbox 3-4 times a week. You can Unsubscribe anytime. Learn more on our Privacy Policy here


Latest posts

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.


Explore Train Travel in Europe



I share regular highlights of my adventures with my travel community on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest where I would love for you to join me.


Pin me on Pinterest for later read!


Look forward to connecting with each of you


Sforza Castle, a favourite for visitors is an enchanting red brick fortress that is home to the many stories of the city's past. A perfect guide for before you go. via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/Sforza Castle, a favourite for visitors is an enchanting red brick fortress that is home to the many stories of the city's past. A perfect guide for before you go. via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Milan bucket list ideas | The best 19 attractions

Milan bucket list ideas | The best 19 attractions

I love Milan! I don’t know how else to say it! I love the vibe, the flair, the pace, the rhythm, the monuments, the history, the colourful designer bags, the picturesque cobbled streets, and historic trams with wooden benches! My short visit to Milan turned out to be one of the best last-minute travel plans I ever did and ticked off a few experiences on my Milan bucket list.

About this post on Milan bucket list ideas

Milan is a lively metropolitan hub often compared as just another city like London, Paris or New York but I think Not! Milan is unique. Milan has Piazzas!! Milan has gelato! Milan has Ossobuco! The city has all of the 19 attractions listed in this Milan bucket list ideas which makes it incomparable to other metropolises. I am working through the list as I shall be returning to Milan on many future occasions.

I have included a Google MyMap towards the end of the post so, you too can use it to design your visit to Milan. Along with this map, there are some suggested tours which you can book to maximise your experiences. To have an authentic experience like a Milanese, get around Milan on their public transport! Everything you need for your Milan bucket list experience is right here, in this post. Scroll all the way down to see all related posts. So, grab yourself a cuppa or an aperitivo – here is the ultimate 19 ideas on Milan bucket list for exploring the best the city has to offer.

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

1 | Milan Cathedral | Milan bucket list

Duomo di Milano, Italy, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

Milan Cathedral, famously also known as simply the Duomo (Duomo di Milano), is a monumental structure and is one of the most visited sites in Milan. It’s sublime architecture took almost 600 years to complete. Construction began in 1386 and was officially completed in the 1960s but with the continuous presence of scaffolding, one may think construction is still very much present!

A combination of Gothic and Romanesque style, this pink and white facade is made of special marble from Val D’Ossola. The front facade is magnificent and is decorated with countless statues, spires and numerous carvings. A symbol of international effort by the many architects, sculptors and artists, this monument is top on Milan bucket list ideas.

Viewing of Milan Cathedral

Beyond its outward experience, a fast-track ticket for a guided tour via a separate entrance for internal viewing of the Duomo was money well spent for a memorable visit. A step inside the Cathedral and you will come to experience specially designed marble floors that rules the Cathedral, tall columns, stained glass windows and beautiful paintings placed all around the walls. In short, it is architecture worth exploring. With a tour guide who knows all the stories, this is one attraction you wouldn’t want to miss.

Then, to top off your experience at Milan Cathedral, with the same skip-the line ticket, go up to the terraces, either via lift or stairs at just before sundown to catch the golden hues turning into the velvety night sky.

Located in the centre of Milan, at Piazza del Duomo, Milan Cathedral is the symbol of Milan. No visit to this fashion capital is complete without stepping foot into its grand doors.

Piazza del Duomo | Milan Cathedral opening hours: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.



2 | Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II | Milan bucket list

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

Sitting just steps away from Milan Cathedral is the opulent and grandest of shopping mall! Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II was designed by Guiseppe Mengoni and completed in 1877. With over 160 years of history, the Galleria Vittorio is one of the oldest shopping mall in the world.

The cross shaped mall covered via four glass panelled arms allows the sunlight in perfectly. So bright and airy! The walls and shop fronts are decorated with ornate panelling and beautiful stucco artwork. The Galleria exudes an air of luxury. There are a string of high-end designer names such as Prada, Versace and Louis Vuitton that line the mall.

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Piazza del Duomo | Accessible at all hours | Shops are typically open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.


3 | La Scala Opera | Milan bucket list

La Scala Opera, Piazza della Scala, Milan, (official La Scala Opera site)

Also known as “Temple of Opera”, the La Scala dates back to 1778. This historical opera theatre is one of its kind to have hosted as many great artists and composers in her time and continue to do so. One of the finest in the world, La Scala is renowned for its acoustic qualities, opulence and grandeur of the seating.

Experiencing a show, seating in one of the 6-tiers of seats or individual boxes that frame the stage in a semi-circle amidst full of red velvet drapes and gold furnishings is surely a memorable occasion. This makes one of Milan bucket list ideas for many, me included. To experience the show, get your tickets from the official La Scala website here.

Located in the small town square of Piazza della Scala, north of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, accessible from Piazza del Duomo.

Via Filodrammatici, 2, 20121 Milano MI, Italy | Guided tours available at specific times.

Join a 1-hour tour of La Scala, learn about its history and visit the museums



4 | Castello Sforzesco | Milan bucket list

Sforzesco Castle, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

This 14th century building is one of the most famous landmarks in Milan. It looks very much like a castle and is set in extensive grounds and gardens. The original design had been modified over the years but still retains its elegance and status of power. It was home to the Dukes of Milan, the Sforza family.

These days, the castle is home to a number of small museums and collections containing a myriad of interesting artefacts and historical information about the castle and Milan.

There are a number of guided tours available where you can learn more of medieval Milan and the Dukes who once ruled this city. The 2-hour guided tour of Sforza Castle and the museum comes with skip-the-line priority giving you access to the grounds and all of the museums. The tours are timed for 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Ensure that you pre-book to secure your tour as soon as you work out your itinerary for Milan.

Castello Sforzesco | Piazza Castello, 3, 20121 Milan Italy | Opening times: Castle grounds free entry – 7.00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. ; Museums – 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through to Sunday.


5 | Parco Sempione | Milan bucket list

Parco Sempione, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

Parco Sempione is a large public space that sits behind Sforzesco Castle. This beautifully landscaped park covers about 38 hectares (95 acres) and offers a myriad of footpaths, bike trails, shaded areas, sculptures and ornate fountains. Flora and fauna abound here.

Walk through the park to see the Arco della Pace (Arch of Peace). There is also a little museum and Torre Branca, a huge watch tower that offers panoramic views of the city.

Parco Sempione is a perfect place to rest your feet if you have walking-tour the city or just to relax.


6 | Arch of Peace | Milan bucket list

Arco della Pace, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

The Arch of Peace (Arco della Pace) is one of the symbols of Milan and marks one of the city’s historical gates. This 18th century Neoclassical triumphal monument is a 23 metre marble structure at one end of the Simplon Road, Parco Sempione. This was the strategic route through the Alps taken by Napolean I when he invaded northern Italy in 1800. Napolean later commissioned the arch to commemorate his victories.

Construction began in 1806 but was not completed until 1838.

Address: Piazza Sempione, 20154 Milano MI, Italy


7 | Torre Branca | Milan bucket list

Aerial view of Milan from Branca Tower

Torre Branca is a panoramic tower situated in Sempione Park. At 108.6 metres, Torre Branca is the 6th tallest structure in Milan after Unicredit Tower, Palazzo Lombardia, Pirellone or Pirelli Tower and the Breda Tower.

Constructed in 1933 and designed by Gio Ponti, the Torre Branca offers unparalleled views over the city of Milan. Ascend to the top by lift and step out to the top of the tower. If you are fortunate with the weather, you might see the snow-capped mountains in the distance. In any event, you will love the city skyline from here, which merits a spot on Milan bucket list ideas.

Address: Viale Luigi Camoens, 2, 20121 Milano MI, Italy



8 | Pinacoteca di Brera | Milan bucket list idea

Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

Pinacoteca di Brera (Breara Picture Gallery) is housed in Palazzo di Brera, an 18th century Neoclassical structure. Pinacoteca is an art museum. Founded in 1809 by Napoleon I and is one of the most important of Italian museums. It is home to a large collection of Italian art.

Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

The museum’s exhibits consist some of the greatest masterpieces of Italian paintings from the 15th century to the 20th century. It has especially rich collections of Venetian and Lombard paintings from the Renaissance and Baroque periods. There are works such as the Marriage of the Virgin by Raphael, Pieta by Bellini, the Last Supper by Rubens and the Adoration of the Magi by Correggio. The works are displayed on the first floor of the building, where the Academy of Fine Arts is also located.

This amazing historical museum is conveniently located in close proximity to both the Sforzesco Castle and the Piazza del Duomo and warrants a spot on Milan bucket list ideas.

Address: Via Brera, 28, 20121 Milano MI, Italy

There is a two hour guided walking tour available for you, combining a visit to Pinacoteca, with a fascinating walk through Milan’s popular Brera district.


9 | Brera District | Milan bucket list idea

Brera is a charming and rather enchanting area of Milan that has many hidden gems to explore. A distinct Bohemian beauty and simple old-school charm, Brera often finds itself in the top of Milan bucket list ideas of many visitors.

The main attraction in Brera is the area itself. The district is full of art academies, galleries, a number of antique shops and well-to-do restaurants and bars. It is a good area to eat like a local, from traditional pasta to pizza and have your Italian beer along with your meal.

You can also go on a little high-end retail therapy, wander through its picturesque cobbled streets, explore the many hidden gems, perhaps stopping for a coffee or an aperitivo in one of its squares.

The vibe here is fantastic and is an experience that should not be missed.

Location: To the north of the Duomo di Milano, in-between Borgonuovo and Broletta. | 20121 Milan, Metropolitan City of Milan, Italy |


10 | Biblioteca Braidense – Brera Library

The Braidense National Library is in the same building as the Pinacoteca di Brera museum and the Brera Academy, making it a perfect stop for a visit. It is a public library, which was created in 1770 by Maria Theresa of Austria.The library was open in 1786. I included the Brera Library as one of Milan bucket list attraction because of its historical significance and contribution towards promoting the book as an object of art.

Furthermore, the Biblioteca Braidense is the third largest library in Milan. This Neo-classical library is home to a collection of 1,500,000 books, including 2,000 manuscripts, 350 of which date back to medieval times, and 25,000 sixteenth-century editions. The collection also includes catalogues, religious books housed in the reading room, a rare collection of letters and first editions by Alessandro Manzoni.  

The reading rooms feature the library’s original wooden shelves and furnishings, crystal chandeliers, frescoed ceilings and a collection of antique paintings. A spot in Milan bucket list is highly merited, I think.

Address: Via Brera, 28, 20121 Milano MI, Italy


11 | Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie | Milan bucket list

Santa Maria delle Grazie (Holy Mary of Grace) is located in the heart of Milan. An outstanding architecture, with a certain charm and grace, it is an emblem to the Catholic religion.

The Santa Maria delle Grazie was built between 1466 and 1490 to a design by architect Guiniforte Solari. The church features a Gothic style using red bricks and a large rear basilica.

Inside the church, more precisely the refectory, on the wall is one of the greatest artistic masterpieces in the world – The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci. The mural depicts the scene of the Last Supper as described in the Bible. Throughout the years, this piece of artwork has been scrutinised and analysed for its hidden meanings and content. It only seems fitting that Santa Maria delle Grazie is included in Milan bucket list of ideas.

Address: Piazza di Santa Maria delle Grazie, 20123 Milano MI,

Pro tip: This is a top rated attraction and tickets are sold out months ahead of time. Pre-book your tickets to secure your visit.


12 | Sant Ambrogio

Church Monastery, San Ambrogio, Milan, Italy, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

Sant Ambrogio (Basilica di Sant’Ambrogio is a church in the centre of Milan. This ancient building is one of Milan’s most important churches. Named after the city’s patron saint, Saint Ambrosius (Ambrose) who consecrated the church in 386 AD during his tenure as bishop of Milan. The church was built in 379 AD and was a focal point for the people, as the city of Milan was built around it.

The architecture is of a simple Romanesque style. Two large towers frame the front facade. The central courtyard is pretty, decorated with a series of ornate arches. The interior of the church features beautiful mosaics and artwork including the ceiling of the Oratory and the delightful depiction of Christ on one of the domes.

A visit to this church is highly recommended, meriting a spot on Milan bucket list ideas as it will provide an insight into the history of Milan and its religious importance.

Address: Piazza Sant’Ambrogio, 15, 20123 Milano MI, Italy


13 | San Bernardino alle Ossa

San Bernardino alle Ossa is a church but a very different kind of church from the rest of the churches in Milan. The church walls are completely covered in bones and skulls! Even the door knobs! Therefore a visit to San Bernardino may not be suitable for everyone.

According to its history, in 1145, a hospital was built near the Santo Stefano Maggiore Church, Milan. The graveyard,became overfilled with bodies from the new hospital, so in 1210 a little chamber was built to collect the bones from the hospital. In 1269 a small church was added near the bone chamber.

Today, you will find San Bernardino alle Ossa located at the end of a short corridor to the the right of the church’s entrance. The vault is decorated with frescos from Sebastiano Ricci, dating from 1695.

If you are interested in visiting an unusual church, then the following information might help you:

Location: Piazza Santo Stefano, Milan, 20122 Italy | Entrance is Free | Closed on Sundays



14 | Leonardo da Vinci National Museum of Science and Technology

Leonardo da Vinci was a legendary man of true genius and amongst the most influential artists in history. He left a significant legacy not only in the realm of art but in science as well, each discipline informing his mastery of the other.a painter, an architect, an engineer, a theatrical producer. Therefore, it stands to reason that a museum named after him contains many of his works and a huge collection of other important scientific and technological displays.

As one of the most important museums in the world, one can expect to find collections of model cars created from da Vinci drawings, reconstructions of his flying machines, and a plethora of his drawings, blueprints and sketches.

Address: Via San Vittore, 21, 20123 Milan MI, Italy


15 | Archaeological Museum Milan

The Archaeological Museum of Milan is housed in the former convent of the Monastero Maggiore and the Church of San Maurizio. Both buildings were founded in 8th and 9th century. Dedicated to the history of ancient Milan, the museum features archaeological finds from several periods. This includes the Middle Ages, influences from the Etruscan civilization and also the ancient Greeks.

Address: Corso Magenta, 15, 20123 Milano MI, Italy


16 | Naviglio Grande

Navigli nightlife, Milan, Italy by Pippocucu, Pixabay

Navigli is fast becoming one of Milan’s most popular neighbourhoods, but there’s more to do here than see the canals. The Naviglio Grande is one of the two canals in Milan. It stretches from the Porta Ticinese to the Ticino river some 50km to the west. Constructed in 1177, the canal was worked on for many years and continued to expand into what it is today.

The canals are busy, especially during the summer months where tourists are ferried up and down the water. The boat tours depart every hour from Alzaia Naviglio Grande. For a bucket list experience, you can choose to cruise the canal on Milan’s first (and only) Venetian Gondola, owned by the Canottieri San Cristoforo – they even offer gondolier lessons. Or you can just grab an aperitivo and sit along the harbour banks and soak in the lively vibe.

The Navigli area is popular as well for good bars and restaurants.

Address: 21015 Milan Italy



17 | Piazza dei Mercanti

Piazza dei Mercanti, Milan, Italy, by Dimitris Vetsikas, Pixabay

Piazza Mercanti (Merchants Square) was once the heart of the city in the Middle Ages, a hub for many merchant activities and trade markets.

It is one of the most picturesque squares in Milan that still preserves an authentic Medieval atmosphere. Notable buildings are Pallazo della Ragione, the Pallazo delle Scuole Palatine and the Loggia degli Osii. There are some important statues and monuments here, some of which have Roman origins.

Pro tip: The loggia dei mercanti, an open air space beneath Pallazo della Ragione is a whispering gallery, Speak softly to some of its columns, and its archways will whisk your whispers to a well-placed listener on the opposite side of the portico.

Piazza Mercanti is located between Piazza del Duomo and Piazza Corduiso | Address: Piazza dei Mercanti, 20123 Milan MI, Italy

Visit this easily accessible square (just 3 minutes walk from Piazza del Duomo) to admire its ancient origins and beautiful architecture.


18 | Porta Nuova

Porta Nuova is the modern face of Milan, making it one of Milan’s most contemporary and trendiest places to visit. The area is characterised by flagship stores, boutiques, residential skyscrapers and landmarks such as Gae Aulenti Square, the towering UniCredit Tower and Bosco Verticale.

Porta Nuova literally means “new gate” and is one of the six main gates to the city of Milan. It was originally built between 1810 and 1813 during the Napoleon era. Today, the Porta Nuova district is popular attraction for commercial investments, tourists and locals.

A vibrant, futuristic, “must-see” district that stand their own ground alongside to the more famous of the historical attractions like the Duomo or La Scala masterpieces.

Address: Piazzale Principessa Clotilde, 37, 20121 Milano MI, Italy


19 | Ride the Historical Tram #1

Historic tram with wooden benches, Milan by Alfonso Cerezo, Pixabay

This is completely different from a modern tram! In Tram #1, wooden benches are placed along the sides, wooden steps to get onboard, folding doors and sash windows. How cool is that! What is really special about this tram is that it is a vehicle with over 100 years of history, which means that there were many generations of Milanese who rode this tram to and from from work, shop or everywhere else.

To discover Milan via this Milan bucket list experience, join a two-and-half hour tour that will take through the city of Milan. Some of the highlights include:

  • Learn the history of the Dukes of Milan at Sforza Castle
  • Enjoy panoramic views of Napoleon’s Arch of Peace
  • Explore Milan’s longest shopping street
  • See the Duomo and La Scala Opera House
  • Climb aboard a streetcar from the 1930s

Practical information for planning your Milan bucket list

Here are some practical information to support your planning and visit to Milan.

1 | Map as a guide

Firstly, using a map as a guide – from the map below, you will note that most of the attractions are all within a cluster of walkable distance. Experiencing all 19 attractions on Milan bucket list idea may take more than a day and/or more than one visit depending on how long your vacation is for. The information in this post along with the map will support you in designing your itinerary and how best to experience these attractions.


2 | Suggested tours

Secondly, below is a summary of suggested tours you can take to learn more of the historical sites this City offers. Pre-book your tickets to secure your visit as some of these attractions are sold out months ahead of time. As bucket list attractions. you wouldn’t want to miss them! Stay flexible with easy cancellation up to 24 hours before. Get your tickets downloaded to your phone for seamless skip-the-line visits.

Explore more ways to experience Milan by navigating to this page.


3 | Getting around Milan

Thirdly, to get around Milan, you may want to purchase the 48-Hour City Pass: Discover Milan With One Card, giving you free access to museums, transport options and discounts with affiliate restaurants. Just so you know, if you are selecting this 48-hour pass and wish to use the dining options, you need to plan ahead and pre-book your favourite restaurants. Milan is a tourist hotspot, and the best restaurants and the best time slots are usually taken at least a month ahead of time.

Getting around Milan like a Local - bucket list

For a detailed guide to Milan’s transport system and ticket options – basically everything you need to know about getting around Milan like a local – navigate to the page


My thoughts on Milan bucket list

Having a Milan bucket list is a good way to compile all the things you want to do and experience in this city. My bucket list comprises of 19 attractions and places to visit to learn more of Milan’s rich history and culture. I am glad to have visited some places already. Also glad that my visits these days are not geared towards ticking off a list anymore. I spend more time in the moment and enjoy what I see and experience. I have a more meaningful takeaway, this way. I have left off food experiences in Milan as it warrants a whole post in itself. I hope you have enjoyed reading this post and some of the attractions will find its way to your bucket list as well.


So, what do you think? Is this post valuable to you in planning your visit to accomplish your Milan bucket list ideas? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you.As always, I am contactable for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Scroll all the way down for recent, related and inspiring articles.

Have a splendid time exploring the beautiful city of Milan.

Georgina xoxo

If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International


Be in the know! Subscribe to our FREE Exclusive Newsletter & Never miss on the Latest post

We value your Privacy and will not sell your information to third parties. We will not spam your inbox. You will receive excellent, beautiful and valuable travel related content to your inbox 3-4 times a week. You can Unsubscribe anytime. Learn more on our Privacy Policy here


Advertisements


Latest posts


Explore Train Travel


Advertisements



Pin me on Pinterest!

I look forward to connecting with each of you


Milan, often compared as just another city like London,  Paris or New York but this 19 Milan bucket list ideas will have you change your mind. via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/Milan, often compared as just another city like London,  Paris or New York but this 19 Milan bucket list ideas will have you change your mind. via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/