The Enchanting Sligachan Bridge and the magical waters of Sligachan on Isle of Skye

The enchanting Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye and the magical waters of Sligachan

On the foreground and very much at home below the wild, rugged Cuillin Mountains on the Isle of Skye is a quaint village called Sligachan but truth be told, it is not the village that people come here to see. A few steps away from the village sits an enchantingly picturesque three-arch old stone bridge simply known as the Sligachan Bridge.

The Sligachan Bridge is special. It is brought to life like many other scenic spots on the Isle of Skye by the stories and legends associated with it.

Many come here to test the spellbinding ancient legend associated with the magical waters of Sligachan that runs under the Sligachan bridge. The enchanted waters of Sligachan is said to deliver eternal beauty provided the brave souls can submerge and stick to the rules!

As well, people come here to see, capture the views of the mighty mountains that so often graces canvasses and television screens and to experience a slice of the wild Scotland.

What to expect from this article on the enchanting Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

This little paradise can be easily missed but it is worth a stop on your itinerary while visiting the Isle of Skye. Keep reading to learn more about the Sligachan Bridge, the legend of the magical waters of Sligachan and how you can unlock the secret to eternal beauty along with a little background on Sligachan Village. You will also find information about an important monument unveiled recently in 2020 and places to stay nearby. Finally, some information on how to reach this remarkable spot and the best time to visit the Sligachan Bridge.

Planning a trip to Scotland?

Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

The enchanting Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

When was the Sligachan Bridge built?

Sligachan Bridge and the legend of magical waters of Sligachan

The legend of magical waters of Sligachan begins with the story of Scotland’s famous warrior woman, Scáthach. She lived around 200 BC in a fortress on the Isle of Skye. A never-ending battle ensued between her and an Irish warrior…

The Warrior Woman

The warrior woman Scáthach, whose name in Gaelic means “Shadowy” is believed to have lived in Dunscaith Castle (known as Dún Scáith in Gaelic, which means “Castle of Shadows”). The Castle was located on the south of the island, in Tokavaig, the ruins of which can still be visited today. Scáthach was the greatest fighter in all of Scotland and news of her greatness travelled far and wide around the globe.

The Competitive Warrior

Soon, an Irish warrior, Cú Chulainn came to know of Scáthach’s might and he hopped across the ocean to Skye to defeat her. According to the legend, Cú Chulainn was half god, super strong and unbeaten. He was not a bad person but just very competitive. His aim was to crush Scáthach and prove his might to everyone in the world.

The Battle

A fierce battle between the two warriors raged for weeks. The warriors were so strong that their battle caused the earth to move and animals to flee Skye. The crushing blows created mountains and valleys. It was the greatest battle the land had ever witnessed. There seemed no end to the battle and only one resolution was inevitable – a battle to the death.

Scáthach’s daughter

Scáthach’s daughter was very upset. She couldn’t take the fighting anymore with the inevitable outcome of death and feared that her mother would lose the battle. She ran to the stream, Sligachan River where she cried and cried and cried…wishing out loud for someone would help stop the battle. Her cries were so passionate and her love for her mother so great that “someone” did hear her from the magical world.

The magical waters of Sligachan was, and still is, believed to be a portal to the faerie world and the faeries heard her heartbreaking cries. The faeries decided to help her and opened the portal. They instructed Scáthach’s daughter to submerge her face in the waters of the stream to discover what she could do to stop the fight. She did as she was told. She emerged from the waters enlightened as the faeries had blessed her with the knowledge of what to do.

The end of the battle

Armed with the knowledge, Scáthach’s daughter went all around Skye, gathering herbs, meats, nuts and everything delicious that Skye produced. She brought them home, and stewed them up into a hearty broth one could ever imagine. She fanned the smoke so it could fill the valleys. The scent of the broth was intensely incredible and travelled far across the Isle of Skye.

The fighting warriors smelt it. They continued the battle but could not go on for much longer. They had not eaten for several weeks and they were starved! Both warriors agreed to take a break to enjoy a feast. They made their way to Scáthach’s home where her daughter greeted them. They feasted together and ate as they have never eaten before.

It was this feast that would mark the end of the battle. By eating in Scáthach’s home, Cú Chulainn became a guest. As such, both warriors cannot hurt each other any more – you can’t really hurt someone who has hosted you right? The battle was over with neither losing to the other.

In pursuit of Eternal Beauty

Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

Legend has it that the portal to the faeries world was forever ‘disturbed’ when they decided to help Scáthach’s daughter. Her passionate tears of love and her beauty opened the portal to the magical world and if anyone should be so brave as to submerge their face on the icy cold water of the magical stream, the faeries would grant them eternal beauty. The waters near to and under the Sligachan Bridge is said to be the portal to the other world.

However, seeking eternal beauty at Sligachan Bridge is not really pleasant or a comfortable thing to do!

Unlocking the secret to eternal beauty at Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

In accordance with the legend, and to unlock the secret to eternal beauty at Sligachan Bridge, you need to observe some rules 🙂

1 | You need to dip your face in the cold magical icy waters of Sligachan;

2 | Must keep your face submerged for a whole 7 seconds;

3 | You can’t stop half way or submerge half a face – if you do, your efforts will be worthless;

4 | You can’t bring the water to your face – it has to be a full face dip;

5 | After your 7 seconds dip, you need to let your face dry naturally.

For the faerie magic to work and for eternal beauty to take hold, you must follow the rules above. This means you may need to get to your hands and knees on the rocks, so your face can touch the magical waters of Sligachan.

You might want to consider bringing a large towel along so you could lay it on the rocks to protect your clothes from getting stained or wet. It might be a good idea to do this on a sunny day so the waters will dry off quickly. As for the icy waters of Sligachan itself, well…this is Scotland after all and I don’t think it will ever be warm!

Safety tips: Just be aware that the river might flow very fast in bad weather and the rocks might be slippery. Please take care when exploring.

Explore the surrounds of Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

When visiting the Sligachan Bridge, you may want to explore more of the picturespue area. You could stop by at Sligachan Village, a few steps away from the bridge and visit the monument dedicated to the Cuillin mountaineers.

About Sligachan Village

Sligachan Village is a small settlement on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. The Village takes its name from the Gaelic word, ‘Sligeachan’ which means “shelly place”, after the shells found at River Sligachan.

This quaint village is located close to the Red and Black Cuillin Mountains with the Sligachan Glen between them. The Village and the old Sligachan Bridge which we had already visited above provides sweeping views of the Cuillin Mountains and the wild Scottish countryside. The scenery from the Sligachan Bridge is amazing. There is also a path that leads to hiking the Cuillins.

A haven for mountaineers and hikers of Cuillin Mountains

Sligachan Village has long been a haven for mountaineers, ever since the 1800s when it was discovered that this part of Scotland had mountains with menacing crags and pinnacles draped in unnatural wisps of cloud. It conjured up the mysteries and excitements, alluring climbers to Skye.

You can find a monument dedicated to the renowned mountaineers of the Cuillin Mountains nearby.

Monument to Skye climbing pioneers of Cuillin Mountains

In Septembeer 2020, a long-awaited tribute to two pioneering climbers of the Cuillin Mountains was unveiled. John Mackenzie and Norman Collie formed a partnership lasting fifty years during which time they climbed, mapped and named many of the Cuillin peaks as is known today.

This fitting tribute have the men gazing at their beloved mountains for all time.

South Skye and Cuillin Hills

The Cuillin, Isle of Skye

Isle of Skye Pathfinder

Skye Walks & Scrambles

North Skye Map

Skye Pocket Map


Where to Stay near Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

Sligachan Village is an ideal base for mountaineers as well as for anyone who do not wish to climb the mountains. Explore the picturesque surrounds of Sligachan Bridge and the unbeaten path of Skye at your own pace while enjoying the hospitality bestowed upon visitors to this village. Sligachan Village has accommodations for all budgets and suits families, couples, groups and climbers.

There is a campsite at the head of Loch Sligachan, within easy walk of the Sligachan Village. The Village offers a bunkhouse that sleeps 8 with self-catering facilities, ideal for shoestring travellers. There are two cottages that sleeps up to 8 each and a house sleeping up to 14. If you want to experience a little luxury, stay at the Sligachan Hotel.

The Sligachan Hotel was built in 1830 and is a classic Scottish hotel. It comes complete with a good restaurant, lounge and a very popular bar. The restaurant is well-known for its “hearty-meals” while the Seumas’ bar at the hotel boasts an impressive collection of over 400 malts!

Accommodations close to Sligachan Bridge – Portree

Sligachan is en-route to Portree, the main city on the Isle of Skye at just 15 minutes journey time. Portree is a popular destination for visitors as it is an ideal base to spend a few days while you explore Skye. Portree offers a wide range of accommodations to suit all budgets along with eateries and bars. Below are some suggestions for a stay at this beautiful harbour town fringed by cliffs and lovely coloured houses.

1 | The Royal Hotel

The Royal Hotel offers stunning views over Portree Harbour with a number of rooms offering sea views. The restaurants specialises in local seafood and continental breakfast is served each day

2 | Skeabost House Hotel

Located in magnificent grounds with its own 9-hole golf course, the Skeabost is perfectly located for exploring the Isle of Skye as well as the Scottish Highlands. Some rooms offer views towards Loch Snizort and its salmon river, on which the hotel has seasonal fishing rights.

For more choices >> places to stay at Portree

Where is Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

The Sligachan Bridge is located along the A87, that links Broadford to Portree. There is a small car park for visitors to Collie-Mackenzie monument and several lay-bys where you could park safely.

Parking is available at Sligachan Hotel but this is strictly limited to guests only. Perhaps, you could stop by at the bar for a taste of one of their 400 malts after exploring Sligachan Bridge?

Best time to Visit the Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye

The Sligachan Bridge and the surrounding areas, are popular spots. Even more so now with the incredible monument dedicated to the mountaineers. As such, nearly all of the Isle of Skye tour groups stop here. Therefore, expect a crowd around mid-morning and late afternoons. If you want to beat the crowds, try visiting early in the morning, before 9:30 a.m. or at dusk. You may catch the sun setting over the Cuillins on a non-rainy day which is said to be a spectacular sight!

Note: If you decide to join a group tour, please ensure with the tour operators that they do stop at the Sligachan Bridge. Drivers have the flexibility to adjust their itinerary to suit and they may decide not to stop here if they are running late for their next destination on the itinerary. Having said that, many tour groups do stop here.

A word of caution though, as early mornings and dusk comes with other impediments too. The dreaded Scottish midge are generally found in swamps and marshy areas. They bite unsuspecting passers-by. The midge season is from mid-May to end of September. If you are worried about these insects affecting you, try Smidge, a midge repellent to keep them away.

Do you believe in faeries?

I do love a good story, be it legends or myths. Although there are a couple of versions to the Sligachan Bridge and the enchanted waters of Sligachan story, I like this one, related by a Scotsman and also because a little good magic never hurts anyone.

As well, it goes without saying that as with any legends, and Skye has many, that one should take it with a generous pinch of salt. While I was totally enchanted with the legend of the magical waters that run under the Sligachan Bridge, I did not dip my face in the icy cold waters of the stream. I did not, only because I did not want my clothes to be dirtied on the day. Hence, my suggestion above to bring a towel along to protect your clothing. I hope to do so on my next trip to Sligachan.

In the alternative, you may want to consider a large bin liner instead.

(Note: If you decide on the bin liner, please ensure to dispose it off responsibly after your trip)

Whether you believe in legends or not, the Sligachan Bridge is a good view point for the wild Scottish countryside and the captivating Cuillin Mountains.


Will you be giving it a go at unlocking the secret to eternal beauty at the enchanting Sligachan Bridge? Do let me know in comments.


Group Tours to consider when visiting the Isle of Skye

If you choose to experience a group tour to the Isle of Skye, perhaps the following suggestions may assist in your decision-making.

Day trip Group Tours to the Isle of Skye

Skye and eilean donan castle tour
Isle of Skye scenery tour with Fairy Pools
skye and eilean donan castle small group tour

Multi Day Group Tours to the Isle of Skye

From Edinburgh - Skye and Jacobite highland
From Edinburgh - Skye and Highlands Tour3 days
from Glasgow multi day trip to Isle of Skye and the Highlands

On a final note

There is always something magical about the Isle of Skye…awe-inspiring landscapes, grey skies, and cotton clouds that follows you wherever you are on Skye! What adds to the magical Skye are the stories. Stories of faeries. Some are true, they say and some are myths and legends that fits the landscape. Somehow, these stories bring to life the scenic beauty of Skye and makes a perfect backdrop to places visited.

I have so much more to share with you about my trips to Scotland – be sure to subscribe to stay connected and not miss out on valuable travel guides.

Have a splendid time exploring Sligachan.

Georgina xoxo

Georgina in Scotland

Georgina_Highlands and Steam Train tours
“Just as I board the West Highland and Jacobite Steam Train”

“While in Scotland, I went on a number of small group guided tours. I find guided tours to be great value for money activities and an excellent tool to get the best overviews of a region.

With this overview, and time on my hands, I explored specific areas of interests for a more personal experience.

My trip to Scotland was self-funded, and none of the activities were sponsored in any way. All opinions, views and experiences are my own. I happily share them with you to inspire you to visit this magical land.

What to expect when being part of a tour group:

Safety precautions were in place. Guides are Scottish who have first hand knowledge of the regions I visited. They shared fascinating stories of legends and history of the Highland, both the bad and the ugly!


Quick facts on Scotland

__________

Population: Over 5.4 million (2020)

Common Language: English. Gaelic is spoken by 1.3% of the population mostly in the west and in the Highlands.

Currency: £ – Pound (GBP)

Capital City: Edinburgh. Home to the first fire brigade in the world, and is the second largest city in Scotland. The largest metropolis in Scotland is Glasgow.

High season: Summer (July – August)

Religion: Christianity – 40% Church of Scotland. 15% Roman Catholic and 6% other Christian denominations. Minorities include Buddhist, Muslim, Hindu and Sikh with a quarter of the population has been recorded as having no religion.

Social courtesies: Handshaking is customary when introduced to someone for the first time. When visiting someone’s home, a small gift such as flowers or a box of chocolates is appreciated.

Scotland: Travel and Transport

Scotland: International Travel

UK Government: Foreign Travel Advice

UK Government: UK nationals travelling abroad

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The enchanting Sligachan Bridge Isle of Skye and the magical waters of Sligachan first published at timelesstravelsteps.com and is regularly updated.

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An enchantingly picturesque three-arch old stone bridge has people flocking to the Isle of Skye for that little magic...| Sligachan Bridge | the magical waters of Sligachan | Old Sligachan Bridge | Isle of Skye | Legends and Myths of Isle of Skye | Sligachan Village | Cuillin Mountains | Monument to Cuiliin mountaineers | wild Scottish countryside | Visit Scotland | Visit the Highland of Scotland | Visit Isle of Skye | Things to do in Scotland | via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/An enchantingly picturesque three-arch old stone bridge has people flocking to the Isle of Skye for that little magic...| Sligachan Bridge | the magical waters of Sligachan | Old Sligachan Bridge | Isle of Skye | Legends and Myths of Isle of Skye | Sligachan Village | Cuillin Mountains | Monument to Cuiliin mountaineers | wild Scottish countryside | Visit Scotland | Visit the Highland of Scotland | Visit Isle of Skye | Things to do in Scotland | via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

Top 9 Super Spooky and Haunted Places on the Isle of Wight

Top 9 super spooky and haunted places on the Isle of Wight

isle of wight haunted places

‘Ghost Island’ – Haunted places on the Isle of Wight

Some say the legends hold true to witness accounts of eerie feelings and sightings, and that the spirits will continue to haunt the places for years to come. Some others regard them, simply as stories.

The creepy-aura on the island piqued in the 1970s and earned itself a reputation as ‘Ghost Island’, attracting ghost-hunters and spooky enthusiasts alike ever since. There has been several books written on the witness’ accounts spurring on more interests in all things that goes “bump” in the night!

Whether one believes in the experiences or not is entirely up to the individual. In this article, I share the places where weird sightings, noises and feelings have been reportedly experienced.

Here are the top 9 most spine-tingling haunted places on the Isle of Wight and its stories:

Top 9 Haunted places on the Isle of Wight

1 | The Ghosts of Ventnor Botanic Gardens

Ventnor Botanic Gardens is a tourist hotspot on the Island. It is renowned for its scenic location and the incredible range of flora and fauna along with rare plants from around the globe that grows spectacularly here. The Ventnor Botanic Gardens is also home to a wide range of butterflies and insects not found any where else in UK.

It is hard to believe that this beautiful place could be haunted but it has been said that it is indeed one of the most haunted places on the Isle of Wight.

Before it became famed as Ventnor Botanic Gardens, it was the location of the Old Royal National Hospital. Patients here were treated for the deadly tuberculosis disease. Over the very many years, thousands of patients, sadly died and their souls are said to haunt the site. There has been several reported sightings since the demolition of the hospital building (where the car park for Ventnor Botanic Gardens is now located) in 1969.

Sightings of sickly-looking ghosts, and phantom nurses in old-fashioned uniforms walking between the flower beds has been reported. Ghostly weepings and groanings have also been heard. There are several remnants of the old building still remaining, including an old disuse tunnel leading out to the cliffs from the end of the gardens. The tunnel was once used for disposing of medical waste. A strong scent of ether has been reported at the garden end by some.

The Ventnor Botanic Gardens usually run a Halloween Ghost Walk special event with access to areas not usually open to the general public.

Where: Ventnor Botanic Garden, Undercliff Drive, Ventnor, Isle of Wight PO38 1UL


Recommended read: Anne Boleyn – Britain’s Most Well Travelled Ghost


2 | The Ghosts at St Catherine’s Lighthouse

Built in 1838 and located near the village of Niton, on the most southerly point of the island, the Lighthouse at St Catherine’s Point is a spectacular place on the Isle of Wight. It’s location is a photographer’s paradise for photos of storms working their way across the English Channel and for perfect views of the stars and milkyway at night.

This tranquil location has been home to many spooky tales which makes St Catherine’s Lighthouse to be one of the most haunted places on the Isle of Wight. From ghost animal sightings, unexplained footsteps and noises to slamming doors and missing items but the most striking story of St Catherine’s Lighthouse goes way back to Second World War.

In an enemy raid during the War, three lighthouse keepers were killed by a bomb. The three keepers were buried in the churchyard at Niton. A memorial plaque dedicated to them is placed inside the lighthouse.

The lighthouse has been fully automated since 1997 but it has been said that there is a ghost that still walks the tower with sightings of a figure in the lamp room and beams of light cutting through fog.

Stay at St Catherine’s Lighthouse

Ghostly sightings aside, St Catherine’s Lighthouse is a popular destination for overnight and weekend or short stays on the island for couples and families.

How about a timeless stay at St Catherine’s Lighthouse? Rural Retreats offer three individual accommodations to suit your needs. Select from the following:

Location: St Catherine’s Lighthouse, Niton, Ventnor PO38 2NF


3 | Appuldurcombe House and it’s ghosts hauntings

This incredibly grand and “complete” mansion at Wroxhall is rather deceiving from a distance but it is only when you are close that it reveals itself as nothing more than ruins.

This extraordinary English Baroque mansion began its story in the 18th century as the seat of the Worsley family. Once the grandest house on the island, it is now one of the grandest haunted places on the Isle of Wight!

Where: Appuldurcombe Road, Wroxall, Isle of Wight, PO38 3EW


4 | The mysterious house at Knighton Gorges

Reportedly, the Knighton Gorges location near Newchurch is another of the most haunted places on the Isle of Wight since medieval times.

Once, there stood a grandest Elizabethan-Tudor style manor house that has seen many tragic events and phenomenal curses had followed the residents throughout the ages.

The curse is said to have started with one Sir Hugh de Morville (d.1202) who was one of the four knights who murdered the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Beckett on December 27, 1170. He, along with the three took residence in the manor house. Mysterious deaths and weird happenings followed the owners and tenants of the manor house at Knighton Gorges throughout the centuries. This include the mysterious death of Sir Tristram Dillington in 1718, until the final owner, George Maurice who destroyed the house in 1821. He did so out of spite because he disapproved of his daughter marrying a clegyman, thus preventing her from inheriting the manor.

There are many ghost stories surrounding the manor house at Knighton Gorges. The removed gargoyles at the gates leading to the manor house are said to reappear every now and again and sightings of Sir Tristram riding his horse on the anniversary of his death. By far the greatest draw for thrill-seeking ghost-tourists is the reappearing of the manor house, all lit up with candles on New Year’s Eve. A New Year’s ball was said to have been held every year and ghost-hunters gather in the hope of hearing music echoing along the fields.

No public access

Just so you know – the land is privately owned and there is no public access to the property.


Recommended read: Ghosts of Blickling Hall, Norfolk


5 | The Hare and Hounds, Burnt House Lane

The stories surrounding the Hare and Hounds is unbelievably chilling – even for a ghost story!

This infamous location is the backdrop to the gruesome stories revolving around an infamous Michael Morey. He killed his grandson, James Dove (14 years old) in the nearby woods, known as Burnthouse Woods. Morey burnt his cottage to the ground to conceal his crime. Dove’s dismembered body was found three months later. Morey was eventually executed and his body hung on the gibbet. The gibbet was positioned near a crossroad on Gallows Hill at the end of Burnt House Lane. The scaffold has the date 1737 carved on it and now forms part of a roof beam in the original pub of the nearby Hare & Hounds.

People wandering or driving along Burnt House Lane has reportedly seen a headless torso directing them to take a different route home. Some others have had the unnerving experience of having their car engines turned off and lights dim for no apparent reason.

Where: Hare & Hounds, Downend Road, Newport, PO30 2NU


6 | Arreton Manor – Haunted places on the Isle of Wight

Where: Arreton Manor, Main Road, Newport, Isle of Wight, PO30 3AA


7 | Carisbrooke Castle

Carisbrooke Castle is a popular destination throughout the year for all the family. Deeply rooted in history since its beginnings in the 11th century, this famous castle had undergone modifications and added defences throughout centuries. Carisbrooke Castle was also a prison at one point in time. Notable prisoners were Charles I who tried to escape but was caught, and later executed in London. His two children, Prince Henry and Princess Elizabeth were sent here as prisoners after his execution. Soon afterwards, Princess Elizabeth, who was just fourteen at that time was found dead. Her face resting on the Bible given to her as gift by her father.

As a famous fortification in English history, Carisbrook Castle has a long-standing reputation of being haunted by all manner of residents. Tales of ghosts, supernatural sightings and horrors of history have all been cited. The moat seems to be one of the most popular locations for ghostly sightings. Reported sightings have been of a grey woman walking around the castle grounds and a huge man in a long white gown around the moat.

If you are up for a bone-chilling experience at Carisbrooke Castle, join-in in their Halloween Week activity designed for 16+ adults.

Where: Carisbrooke Castle, Castle Hill, Newport, PO30 1XY | Isle of Wight

Recommended read: Unmissable 9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight


8 | Golden Hill Fort, Freshwater – haunted places on the Isle of Wight

Built in the Victorian era between 1863 and 1869, the Golden Hill Fort was built on highground in Freshwater as a barracks and coastal defence overlooking the Solent. The six-sided fort is a Grade I listed building and was recently converted to a series of luxury homes.

One may wonder why is this remarkable building one of the top haunted places on the Isle of Wight.

The ghostly happenings at the Golden Hill Fort goes way back to its days as an army barracks. There are accounts of the ghost of a much hated sergeant major who died “accidentally” by missing his steps on the spiral staircase. His yells, tobacco smoke and doors slamming have all been seen and felt over the years. There is also the ghost of a sailor who was put to death for espionage roaming the halls of the Fort.

Where: Golden Hill Fort, Norton Green, Freshwater, PO40 9SJ


9 | Whitecroft Hospital – haunted places on the Isle of Wight

After about a century in operation, the Whitecroft Hospital finally closed its doors in 1992. The building is converted to residential apartments as Gatcombe Manor.

Workmen involved in the construction of the apartments have reportedly seen nurses in faded uniforms, and the unnerving feeling of being watched. A regular sighting has been of a doctor strolling along the car park, seemingly arriving for work. He has also been seen peering through the ground floor windows of the building.

Where: Gatcombe Manor, Sandy Lane, Gatcombe PO30 3DW


Read: Best group tours from London to Isle of Wight


On a final note…

Gaynor Baldwin is a world renowned paranormal expert and author who has written several books on the ghostly happenings of this island. Here are a few of them if you wish to learn more:


The Isle of Wight at a Glance

Coordinates: Latitude: 50° 40′ 30.59″ N Longitude: -1° 16′ 30.60″ W

Isle of Wight
The Isle of Wight flag
Isle of Wight
The Isle of Wight Coat of Arms

Basic facts:

Island: Largest island in England

Island’s city: Newport

Population: 141,538 | Second most populous island in England behind Portsea Island.

Landmass: The Isle is roughly 380.728 kilometer/147 square miles

County: Governed by one unitary authority.

Time Zone: Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) | British Summer Time (BST)

High season: July – August

Religion: Christianity

Language: English

Money

Currency: Pounds Sterling (£)

Credit and Debit cards accepted.

Topography

Elevation: Maximum elevation: 242 m | Average elevation: 15 m | Minimum elevation: -1 m

Highest point: St Boniface Down – 241 metres (791 ft)

Designation:

1 | Isle of Wight Biosphere Reserve, United Kingdom

2 | Isle of Wight – Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

Why Visit:

Famous for: Ghosts, Dinosaur bones, Victorian villages, Cycling routes, Walking & Hiking + Healing & Wellbeing retreats

Number of Visitors surpass residents >

Travel Advice

Isle of Wight Travel Advice

Travelling to the UK Advice

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Resources used – Haunted places on the Isle of Wight:

hauntedrooms.co.uk

visitisleofwight.co.uk

Even More Ghosts of the Isle of Wight by Gay Baldwin

ghostisland.com


Top 9 Super Spooky and Haunted Places on the Isle of Wight first published at timelesstravelsteps.com in October 2021.

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Apparently you are never alone on this island, regarded as one of England's best haven. Explore the most time-honoured, talked about, spine-chilling haunted places on the Isle of Wight aka 'Ghost Island' in the world for an absolute ghoulish fix! Top spooky places on the Isle of Wight | Top haunted places on the Isle of Wight | Ghost Island | Isle of Fright | Best things to do on the Isle of Wight | Halloween on the Isle of Wight | What to do on Halloween at the Isle of Wight via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/Apparently you are never alone on this island, regarded as one of England's best haven. Explore the most time-honoured, talked about, spine-chilling haunted places on the Isle of Wight aka 'Ghost Island' in the world for an absolute ghoulish fix! Top spooky places on the Isle of Wight | Top haunted places on the Isle of Wight | Ghost Island | Isle of Fright | Best things to do on the Isle of Wight | Halloween on the Isle of Wight | What to do on Halloween at the Isle of Wight via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

The unique Collie-Mackenzie Monument at Skye’s celebrated Cuillin Mountains

The unique Collie-Mackenzie Monument at Skye’s celebrated Cuillin Mountains

Over a century ago, two men went on an adventure to reveal the thrills and exhilarations of the Black Cuillin Mountains in Scotland. They climbed, discovered and mapped their routes on one of the most challenging mountains in Britain, bringing the Cuillin within reach of the many mountaineers who followed in their footsteps. The Cuillin Mountains were climbed before but not most of the treacherous Black Cuillin. Its dark coarse, knife-sharp pinnacles were largely unknown territory until these were explored by the two renowned British mountaineers, Collie and Mackenzie. Today, there is a fitting tribute to these two remarkable men. The unmissable unique Collie-Mackenzie monument sits at the foot of Skye’s celebrated Cuillin Mountains in Sligachan.

About this post

This post gives an overview of the two remarkable mountaineers, and the alliance they formed to achieve many of the climbs at the Cuillin range. A fitting tribute to their courageous accomplishments is now placed in area they both loved at Sligachan, Isle of Skye.

collie-mackenzie monument

About the two remarkable mountaineers — John Mackenzie and Norman Collie | The Collie-Mackenzie Monument

John Morton Mackenzie (1856 – 1933)

John Morton Mackenzie was born in 1856 in Sconser, Isle of Skye. He began climbing at a young age. He conquered Sgurr nan Gillean when he was just 10 years old. In his teens, he worked at the Sligachan Hotel as a pony man.

At the age of 14, Mackenzie was part of the ascent to the Cuillin’s 973 metres (3,192ft) peak Sgurr a’ Ghreadaidh.  Sgurr a’ Ghreadaidh is the highest summit on the northern half of the Black Cuillin ridge. At 18, Mackenzie accompanied another climber for the first ascent to Sgurr Dubh Mor, which is 944 metres (3,097ft). In 1887, he tackled the first ascent of Am Basteir at 934 metres (3064ft). There were a few more remarkable achievements by this intrepid explorer who went on to become the first professional mountain guide.

John Norman Collie (1859 – 1942)

John Norman Collie was born in Alderley Edge, Cheshire on September 10, 1859. He was commonly known as Norman Collie and by profession, was a scientist specialising in chemistry. Collie went on to embrace exploring and mountaineering.

In 1886, Collie and his brother were on a fishing trip to the Isle of Skye. The brothers stayed at the Sligachan Hotel and were inspired to climb the Cuillin Mountains. They were partly inspired by the views of men climbing the Cuillins observed from the windows of the hotel. The two brothers made an ascent of Sgùrr nan Gillean twice and were unsuccessful on both occasions. Afterwards, they enlisted the advice of John Mackenzie, who was a professional mountaineering guide by now. Mackenzie gave them the guide on the route for a successful climb.


The Collie — Mackenzie alliance

Collie returned to Skye regularly and climbed the Cuillin Mountains with Mackenzie. Both forged a remarkable friendship while exploring the range. Together they made many first ascents, overcoming some of the toughest climbing challenges.

During the course of their adventures, Collie sought to produce much better maps of the Cuillin Mountains while Mackenzie struck up new routes. They also named some of the mountains and rocks. The Sgurr Mhic Choinnich is named after Mackenzie.

Both Collie and Mackenzie are regarded as the greatest mountaineers of their time. They ventured into tough, uncharted territory with basic clothing, boots and rope in circumstances of no chance of rescue if they encountered difficulty.

Mackenzie died in 1933. He was a mountain guide for fifty years.

Collie retired in 1929 and spent most of his summers in Skye. During his final years, he became a permanent resident of the Sligachan Hotel. He often sat at a window with views of the Cuillin Mountains. That room is named after him and is known as Collie Lounge.

Collie passed away in Sligachan, on November 1, 1942, from pneumonia. In accordance with his wishes, he is buried next to his friend, John Mackenzie in an old graveyard at Struan, Loch Harport within sight of the Cuillin Mountains.

The Cuillin Mountain range | The Collie-Mackenzie Monument

The Cuillin Mountain range is one of the world’s infamous landscapes and has attracted geologists from around the world. The range can be categorised into two groups. The jagged ridges of the Black Cuillin contrasts sharply with the smooth red hills, known as the Red Cuillin. Both were formed deep in a volcano about 60 million years ago. The mountains seen today were gradually exposed both by geological uplift and intense weathering and erosion from above.

The exposed rocks of the Cuillin were sculpted by glaciers over the last million years or so, forming sharp ridges and U-shaped valleys that is seen today. The glaciers also moved huge blocks of rocks and these juts out from the mountain!

At 992 metres (3255 ft), Sgùrr Alasdair is the highest peak of the Cuillin Mountains as well as the highest peak on the Isle of Skye. The Cuillin has 12 Munros (mountains of more than 3000ft). With narrow ridges, pinnacles and rock buttresses, these Munros are acknowledged as the hardest to climb. In addition, the long scrambles over loose rocks before reaching an ascent has proven to be equally challenging.

One of the most challenging climb is the Inaccessible Pinnacle, commonly known as Pinn. The Pinn is a large rock of about 50 metres at the longest edge and sits atop Sgùrr Dearg. It is well-known as the most notorious of munros to climb at the Cuillin, a challenge that requires determination and a strong nerve.

The Collie-Mackenzie Monument

Both Professor Norman Collie and John Mackenzie were instrumental in exploring and mapping the Black Cuillin. Their pioneering climbs has set a route for others to follow and used by climbers today. To celebrate the men’s achievements as well as their friendship, a unique memorial to the two mountaineers was unveiled in September 2020 at Sligachan.

This unique artwork sits at the picturesque location that marks the route into Glen Sligachan, a path that was familiar to Mackenzie when he worked as a pony boy and later, as a professional mountain guide. The bronze sculpture of both men sits high on rocks, with Mackenzie sitting and Collie standing. The men gaze at their beloved Cuillin Mountains for all time.


How to visit the Collie-Mackenzie Monument at Sligachan, Isle of Skye

The Sligachan area on Isle of Skye is a popular destination. Almost all tour groups stop here briefly en-route to Portree.

Sligachan is located along the A87, that links Broadford to Portree. There is a small car park for Collie-Mackenzie monument visitors and several lay-bys where you could park safely.

Parking is also available at the nearby Sligachan Hotel but this is strictly limited to guests only. Perhaps, you could stop by at Collie Lounge, sit by the window with views of the Cuillins just as Norman Collie did many years ago while sipping one of their 400 malts after exploring the monument and surrounds?

Alternatively, there are a number of group tours that might be of interest to you. One thing you may want to ensure is that the tour group you join will stop at Sligachan.


On a final note…

The Collie-Mackenzie monument marks a new tourist attraction amidst a splendid natural setting on the wild countryside of The Highland, Scotland. Regarded as the island of the faeries, the Isle of Skye boasts many myths and legends. Old bridges, castle ruins and waterfalls has a story that will captivate your imagination , right from the moment you cross into Skye. There is much to see, and experience here.

There is a dedicated page on Scotland where you will find all articles written on this beautiful country.

I look forward to sharing more with you. Stay connected with Timeless Travel Steps for stories on travel, culture and history. You may also receive exclusive readership offers to plan your travels ahead of time.

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Have a splendid time visiting the Collie-Mackenzie monument on Isle of Skye.

Georgina xoxo

Georgina in Scotland

Georgina_Highlands and Steam Train tours
“Just as I board the West Highland and Jacobite Steam Train”

“While in Scotland, I went on a number of small group guided tours. I find guided tours to be great value for money activities and an excellent tool to get the best overviews of a region.

With this overview, and time on my hands, I explored specific areas of interests for a more personal experience.

My trip to Scotland was self-funded, and none of the activities were sponsored in any way. All opinions, views and experiences are my own. I happily share them with you to inspire you to visit this magical land.

What to expect when being part of a tour group:

Safety precautions were in place. Guides are Scottish who have first hand knowledge of the regions I visited. They shared fascinating stories of legends and history of the Highland, both the bad and the ugly!


Quick facts on Scotland

__________

Population: Over 5.4 million (2020)

Common Language: English. Gaelic is spoken by 1.3% of the population mostly in the west and in the Highlands.

Currency: £ – Pound (GBP)

Capital City: Edinburgh. Home to the first fire brigade in the world, and is the second largest city in Scotland. The largest metropolis in Scotland is Glasgow.

High season: Summer (July – August)

Religion: Christianity – 40% Church of Scotland. 15% Roman Catholic and 6% other Christian denominations. Minorities include Buddhist, Muslim, Hindu and Sikh with a quarter of the population has been recorded as having no religion.

Social courtesies: Handshaking is customary when introduced to someone for the first time. When visiting someone’s home, a small gift such as flowers or a box of chocolates is appreciated.

Scotland: Travel and Transport

Scotland: International Travel

UK Government: Foreign Travel Advice

UK Government: UK nationals travelling abroad

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The dark coarse, knife-sharp pinnacles were largely unknown territory until these were explored by the two renowned British mountaineers, Collie and Mackenzie. Today, there is a fitting tribute for their remarkable accomplishments at the foot of Cuillin Mountains via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/The dark coarse, knife-sharp pinnacles were largely unknown territory until these were explored by the two renowned British mountaineers, Collie and Mackenzie. Today, there is a fitting tribute for their remarkable accomplishments at the foot of Cuillin Mountains via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

Presently October 2021| Fun folklores and traditions

Presently October 2021

In the entire circle of the year there are no days so delightful as those of a fine October, when the trees are bare to the mild heavens, and the red leaves bestrew the road, and you can feel the breath of winter, morning and evening – no days so calm, so tenderly solemn, and with such a reverent meekness in the air.”

Alexander Smith

There are all kinds of fun activities to get into in October, especially one that calls for eerie dress-ups, full moons, pumpkin patches, and autumn spiced foods. So, grab yourself a warm mug of pumpkin spiced latte, get comfortable and read on to find out all about the special presently October has in store for you.

Welcome to October e-column

About the month of October

October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, second month of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and is the second month of spring in the Southern Hemisphere. The month of October has thirty-one days.

The word ‘October’ comes from the Latin word, ‘Octo’ meaning “eight.” The early Roman calendar started in March, so October was the eight month. Then the Romans converted to a 12-month calendar and the year started in January, with October being the tenth month.

To the Welsh, October is ‘Hydref’ which refers to the lowing of cattle.


With autumn dressing herself in bold and vibrant homely hues, of scarlet maple and golden leaves, the season creates a sense of inner calm. Along with special birthstone and birthflower, presently October takes a look at traditions and at some important events such as Octoberfest, Daylight Saving Time, Halloween and special astronomical celebrations.

October birthstone

Pictured above is Opal, unique and distinctly in a class by themselves. They are specially delicate, require special care and popularly worn.

This exotic gemstone comes in all shapes, translucent, transparent and in rainbow colours. It is a stone of good fortune, bringing an abundance of wealth, health and happiness.

October birth flower

October birth flower is the Calendula.

There are about fifteen species to the Calendula family. The bright orange and yellow daisy-like flowers are native to Asia, Central Europe and the Mediterranean. The name has its origin in the Latin word, ‘calendae’, meaning “the first day of the month”.

Since ancient times, the Calendula plant had been used for medicinal purposes. It is known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties, often used to treat infections.


Stay Connected with Timeless Travel Steps


October Traditions, Festivals, Folklores and Events

Traditions, Festivals and Folklores

1 | The “Lost in the Dark” October Bells of St Mary’s Church, Twyford, Hampshire | October 7

Back in the 18th century, one Mr William Davis was riding home to Twyford, Hampshire on the evening of October 7. He was suddenly overcome by thick fog and could not see his way home. Just then, he heard the bells of St Mary’s Church ring and realised he was heading in the wrong direction. Mr Davis guided his galloping steed towards the sounds of the bells. They arrived home safely.

Later, he found out that he was only yards away from a deeply dug quarry pit. Had he gone further, he would have been killed.

Mr Davis died in 1754. In his Will, he left a pound for a peal of bells to be rung on each anniversary of October 7 and for a feast for the bell-ringers afterwards. The money ran out a long time ago but the Church continues on with the tradition. The bell-ringers of St Mary’s Church ring the bells twice, at 6:30 a.m. and at 7:00 p.m. on October 7 every year to help travellers find their direction, should they get lost in the fog.

Where: St Mary’s Church, Twyford, Hampshire, SO21 1NS. https://wpbells.org/twyford/

2 | Feast Day of St Keyne | October 8

A well in Cornwall is known as a ‘holy well’ and is named after a 5th century Celtic saint, Keyne (Cain Wyry, 461-505). She was the daughter of King Brychan of Brecknock. Keyne dedicated her life to Christianity. Legend has it that she planted four trees around this  well — an oak, an elm, an ash and a willow and imparted strange powers to its waters.

According to the legend, following a wedding, the first of the marriage partners to drink from well’s waters will be the dominant partner.

Robert Southey (1774-1843) wrote a poem about this Well:

A well there is in the west country,

And a clearer one never was seen,

There is not a wife in the west country

But has heard of the well of St Keyne.”

Robert Southey, An English Poet

Location: The Holy Well of St Keyne, southeast of St Keyne’s Church, St Keyne, Liskeard PL14 4RJ, Cornwall

3 | St Luke’s Day, October 18

St Luke’s Day is special in Christianity. He is the first Christian physician on record. He is the patron saint of artists, physicians, and surgeons.

However, in England, traditionally, October 18 is set aside so girls could gain an insight into their future marriage prospects. For them to see their true love, they have to adhere to some rules.

Before they get to bed, girls will have to put a mixture of spices blended with honey and vinegar on their face. When in bed, they must recite the following rhyme:

St Luke, St Luke, be kind to me;

In dreams, let me my true love see.

4 | English Pudding Season

5 | Oktoberfest

Oktoberfest has its origins as a celebration in honour of the Bavarian royal wedding in 1810. This original beer festival is celebrated in Munich, Germany. It is celebrated with traditional costumes, rides, food and lots of beer tents. The carnival style celebration begins sometime mid September and lasts till the first Sunday in October. Over the years other capital cities has adopted this celebration in recognition of their German community and is a popular event in London.

6 | Halloween

Halloween is a celebration observed in many countries on October 31. The day is said to originate in the Christian calendar, the eve of All Hallows Day. It is a day dedicated to remembering the dearly departed, the saints and martyrs. However, there are suggestions that over time, this Halloween tradition was influenced by folk customs and beliefs from the ancient Celtic harvest festival, Sanhaim.

Samhaim marked the end of harvest and the beginning of the darker half of the year, winter. It was believed that the souls of the dead could return to Earth for one night of the year.

October – all things pumpkin and nice!

With beautiful, bright, warm and charmingly invigorating colours along with legends and Hallowee, October is also exceptional for the special aroma of spices and flavours. A unique combination of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and allspice mixed together to create the tantalizing pumpkin spiced latte or pumpkin spiced cake — that little slice of heaven we, as lovers of pumpkin spice savour at this season.

Do you like pumpkin spiced latte or cake/bread? Share your views in comments below.

Quotes and Sayings in October

Listen! The wind is rising, and the air is wild with leaves; We have had our summer evenings, now for October eves!”

Humbert Wolfe

Autumn colors remind us we are all one dancing in the wind”

Lorin Morgan-Richards

All things on earth point home in old October; sailors to sea, travellers to walls and fences, hunters to field and hollow, and the long voice of the hounds, the lover to the love he has forsaken”

Thomas Wolfe

Rain in October means wind in December

When berries are many in October; Beware a hard winter.

If the October moon comes without frost, expect no frost till the moon of November.

October astronomical events

October 8 – 9


October 20, 2021

In skylore, Hunter’s Moon is the full moon following Harvest Moon. It usually appears in October but sometimes in early November. This year, Hunter’s Moon is said to rise on October 20 for most of the world.

Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time (DST) ends for most countries in Europe and begins in Australia. The clocks go forward one hour from standard time in Australia as they enter summer time. The European countries go back one hour from standard time for winter.

In UK, remember to turn your clocks back at 02:00 a.m. on October 31.



What happened in September…

presently October
presently in October
presently October 2021

Articles to be published in October

old sligachan bridge isle of skye
haunted places on the Isle of Wight
Halloween quotes, captions and sayings

…and hopefully more — stay tuned


That’s a wrap from me for now, till next time. Have a super awesome month of October.

Georgina xoxo


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presently october
presently October

Resources:

timeanddate.com

almanac.com

wikipedia.com


Presently October 2021| Fun facts and more first published at timelesstravelsteps.com in October 2021

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With autumn dressing herself in bold and vibrant homely hues, of scarlet maple and golden leaves, the season creates a sense of inner calm. Along with special birthstone and birthflower, presently October takes a look at traditions and at some important events via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/With autumn dressing herself in bold and vibrant homely hues, of scarlet maple and golden leaves, the season creates a sense of inner calm. Along with special birthstone and birthflower, presently October takes a look at traditions and at some important events via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

Halloween — Best 55 Quotes, Captions and Sayings for that creepy vibes in October

Halloween — Best 55 Quotes, Captions and Sayings to stir that creepy vibes in October

It is that time of the year when gardens and homes get draped in fake cobwebs and Halloween creepy-crawly decor makes its way to the front porches to create a perfect setting for trick-or-treaters long awaited holiday. Halloween may not be a time to make a scene for everyone but if you can’t wait to get into the spirit of all things spooky, carve jack-o-lanterns, create pumpkin spiced drinks, to pick-out your favourite costume, and let’s not forget the candy – the quotes, captions and sayings below will put you in the spookiest of moods to celebrate Halloween in all its scary nobility!

Halloween quotes and captions

55 of the Best Spookiest Halloween Quotes, Captions and Sayings to stir that creepy vibes in October

halloween quotes


3 | “We have had our summer evenings, now for October eves” – Humbert Wolfe, British Poet


4 | “On Halloween you get to become anything that you want to be” – Ava Dellaria, American Author


5 | “When the witches go riding, and black cats are seen, the moon laughs and whispers ’tis near Halloween” – Unknown


Related: Ghosts of Blickling Hall, Norfolk


Halloween Quotes, Captions and Sayings

Halloween quotes, captions and sayings

6 | “I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers” – L.M. Montgomery, Canadian Author



8 | “I love Halloween, and I love that feeling; the cold air, the spooky dangers lurking around the corner” – Evan Peters, American Actor


9 | “During the day, I don’t believe in ghosts. At night, I’m a little more open-minded” – Unknown


10 | “When black cats prowl and pumpkins gleam, may luck be yours on Halloween” – Unknown


halloween quotes

11 | “Shadows of a thousand years rise again unseen. Voices whisper in the trees, ‘Tonight is Halloween!’ ” – Dexter Kozen


12 | “Halloween wraps fear in innocence, as though it were a slightly sour sweet. Let terror, then, be turned into a treat…” – Nicholas Gordon


13 | “I must go in. The fog is rising.” – Emily Dickinson


14 | “There is a child in every one of us who is still a trick-or-treater looking for a brightly-lit front porch” – Robert Brault, American Author


15 | “Magic is really very simple, all you’ve got to do is to want something, and then let yourself have it” – Aggie Cromwell, Halloweentown


Halloween Quotes, Captions and Sayings

halloween quotes

16 | “There are nights when the wolves are silent, and only the moon howls” – George Carlin, American Comedian


17 | “Nothing on Earth so beautiful as the final haul on Halloween night” – Steve Almond, American Short Story Writer


18 | “I was born on the night of Samhain, when the barrier between the worlds is whisper-thin and when magic, old-magic, sings its heady and sweet song to anyone who cares to hear it.” – Carolyn MacCullough, Once a Witch


19 | “Deep into the darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before” – Edgar Allen Poe, The Raven


20 | “Everyday is Halloween, isn’t it? For some of us” – Tim Burton, American Filmmaker


21 | “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself…and spiders!” – Unknown


22 | “The farther we’ve gotten from the magic and mystery of our past, the more we’ve come to need Halloween” – Paula Guran, American Author


Recommended read: Anne Boleyn Britain’s Most Well Travelled Ghost

Halloween Quotes, Captions and Sayings

halloween quotes

23 | “It’s a full moon tonight. That’s why all the weirdos are out” – Dani, Hocus Pocus


24 | “Werewolves howl. Phantoms prowl. Halloween’s upon us now.” – Richelle E. Goodrich, American Author


25 | “There is magic in the night when pumpkins glow by moonlight” – Unknown


26 | “Halloween is not only about putting on a costume, but it’s about finding the imagination and costume within ourselves” – Elvis Durran, Radio Show personality


27 | “Have you come to sing pumpkin carols?” – Linus, It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown


28 | “Do you believe in destiny? That even the powers of time can be altered for a single purpose” – Bram Stoker, Dracula


29 | “When the witches went waltzing” – Linda Williams

30 | ” ‘Tis the night – the night of the graves delight and the warlocks are at their play; Ye think that without the wild winds shout, but no, it is they – it is they” – Arthur Cleveland Cox, American Writer


31 | “It’s as much fun to scare as to be scared” – Vincent Price


Halloween Quotes, Captions and Sayings

halloween quotes

32 | “She used to tell me that a full moon was when mysterious things happen and wishes come true” – Shannon A. Thompson, American Author


33 | “On Halloween, witches come true; wild ghosts escape from dreams. Each monster dances in the park.” – Nicholas Gordon, Poet


34 | “There is something haunting in the light of the moon” – Joseph Conrad, Polish-British Writer


35 | “The moon has awoken with the sleep of the sun, the light has been broken; the spell has begun” – Midgard Morningstar


36 | “A house is never still in darkness to those who listen intently; there is a whispering in the distant chambers, an unearthly hand presses the snib of the window, the latch rises. Ghosts were created when the first man woke in the night” – J.M. Barrie, Scottish Author


37 | “October was always the least dependable of months…full of ghosts and shadows” – Joy Fielding



39 | “Believe nothing you hear, and only one half that you see” – Edgar Allan Poe


40 | “Halloween is an opportunity to be really creative” Judy Gold, American Comedian


41 | “Witch and ghost make merry on this last day of dear October days” – Unknown


Halloween Quotes, Captions and Sayings

halloween quotes, captions and sayings

42 | “Shadows mutter, mist replies; darkness purrs as midnight sighs” – Rusty Fischer, American Author


43 | “Men say that in this midnight hour, the disembodied have power” – William Motherwell


44 | “The dead rise again, the bats fly, terror strikes, and screams echo, for tonight its Halloween” – Unknown


45 | “Darkness falls across the land; The Midnight Hour is close at hand” – Rodney Lynn Temperton


46 | “The World turned upside down – in a good way – for one black velvet night” Karen Fortunati, American author.


47 | “Anyone could see that the wind was a special wind this night, and the darkness took on a special feel because it was All Hallows’ Eve” – Ray Bradbury


48 | “For a witch you certainly don’t know much about how hauntings work” – Colleen Houck


49 | “Listen to them – the children of the night. What music they make!” – Bram Stoker, Irish Author


Halloween Quotes, Captions and Sayings

halloween quotes, captions and sayings

51 | “You must believe me, it was a horseman, a dead one! Headless!” – Ichabod Crane, Sleepy Hollow

52 | “It’s all just a bunch of hocus pocus” – Max, Hocus Pocus

53 | “Trick or treat, bag of sweets, ghosts are walking down the street.” – Unknown

54 | “Sticky fingers, tired feet; one last house, trick or treat!” – Rusty Fischer, American Author

halloween quotes, captions and sayings

55 | “When there is no imagination, there is no horror” – Arthur Conan Doyle, British Writer


Have a great Halloween!


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Halloween — Best 55 Quotes, Captions and Sayings to stir that creepy vibes in October first published at timelesstravelsteps.com and is regularly updated

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Halloween — Best 55 Quotes, Captions and Sayings to stir that creepy vibes in October| Halloween | Things to do in October | Spookiest Quotes | Halloween Quotes for Instagram | via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/Halloween — Best 55 Quotes, Captions and Sayings to stir that creepy vibes in October| Halloween | Things to do in October | Spookiest Quotes | Halloween Quotes for Instagram | via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

The Boleyn Lineage – An easy overview on Where the Boleyn descendants are today

The Boleyn Lineage – An easy overview on Where the Boleyn descendants are today

What to expect from this article on the Boleyn lineage

This article is an overview of what I now know about the Boleyn lineage in relation to the present royal family. As it is an overview, I have eliminated historical details to keep it simple but have included basic information to keep the subject matter in context. This helps us see how the Boleyn lineage had flowed through the centuries.

In this article, I have included a section on the numerous variations and the much debated spelling of the Boleyn family name, and why I opted for ‘Boleyn’ instead of other variations. Along with this, is a recap of who the Boleyn family were in history, although there is no consensus on the origin of the Boleyn family.

Links to resources are appended at the end of the article.

boleyn lineage

What was the Boleyn real surname – Boleyn, Bullen, Bolan or something else?

the Boleyn lineage

Variations of the surname ‘Boleyn’

In 1509, during the funeral of Henry VII, “Bolan” was used to address Sir Thomas. In the very same year of 1509, an invite to Sir Thomas and his wife Elizabeth, for the coronation of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon reads “Boleyne” and “Bolen” respectively. Sir Thomas’ brother, James went by his surname spelt as “Bulleyn”. In fact, Anne Boleyn herself, signed off as “Anna de Boullan’ in a letter she wrote to her father in 1513 when she lived in Austria.

These variations and more of the surname ‘Boleyn’ existed during the Tudor period. The primary reason cited for the variations in the spelling of the surname is the inconsistencies of Tudor words and spellings. Having said that, the inconsistencies also existed way back in the thirteenth century.

In a research carried out by Rev. Canon Parsons, who authored “Some notes on the Boleyn Family” in 1935 concluded that whilst the surname was spelt in various ways: “…Boleyn, Buleyn, Bolen, Bulleyne, Boleyne, Bolleyne, Boyleyn, Bowleyne, Bulloigne, and the modern form Bullen” , the spelling, “Boleyn” was the most common of the medieval forms.”

Popular and accepted spelling of the surname ‘Boleyn’

Therefore, given the variations and the non-standardised spelling of the surname, along with the popular acceptance by historians and writers of the surname spelt as “Boleyn”, I shall also accept this and use this spelling in my articles on the Boleyn lineage and related articles on the Boleyns.

Note: The city of Boulogne in France was written as “Boleyn” in the Chronicles of Calais. There are also other documents that refer to Boulogne as Boleyn. Historians belief that the Boleyn family originated from here and made their way to Norfolk during the Normans invasion in the 11th century. This opens up a whole new world of discovery for me, and I hope one day, will be able to investigate further.

A recap of earlier history of the Boleyn family

The earliest recorded history of the Boleyn family in England begins in the thirteenth century and surrounds humble beginnings.

There are mentions of a John Boleyn acting as surety for a William Boleyn in the local register of Walsingham Abbey, Norfolk in 1283.

According to wikitree geneology on the Boleyn family, one Ralph Boleyn was born roundabout 1260 in England. He had one child, John Boleyn, born around 1300. John Boleyn had one child, Thomas Boleyn, born around 1350. There are no records of the spouses to Ralph and John Boleyn.

Thomas Boleyn was a farmer in Salle, Norfolk. There are some mentions of him having descended from Nicholas Boleyn but I could not find information on Nicholas Boleyn to confirm.

Where do we begin…

Therefore, it is with Thomas Boleyn, born roundabouts 1350 where we will begin to trace the Boleyn lineage in this article.

To reiterate, this article on the Boleyn Lineage is intended as an overview. I have not included details of events and background information but have provided recommended reads and links.

Follow the highlights in red…

The Boleyn Lineage – from 1300s to 1603

Thomas Boleyn, [(1350 – 1411) farmer, Salle, Norfolk] mar. Jane (Bracton) Boleyn [(1359 – ?) daughter of Sir John Bracton, Salle, Norfolk] 1 child: Geoffrey Boleyn (1380)

Geoffrey Boleyn [(1380 – Mar 25 1440) Blickling, Norfolk, England] mar. Alice (Bracton) Boleyn [(1385 – 1440) Salle, Norfolk, England 3 children: Thomas Boleyn (1403 – 1472); Geoffrey Boleyn (1406 – 1463); Cecily Boleyn (1408 – 1458)

Geoffrey Boleyn [b.1406, Norfolk England – d.1463, City of London] – also known as Sir Geoffrey Boleyn or Bullen, a successful merchant in the City of London mar. Anne (Hoo) Boleyn [(1425 – Jun 6, 1485) Norfolk, England

8 Children:

Alicia (Boleyn) Aucher; Alice (Boleyn) Fortescue; Cecily Boleyn; Thomas Boleyn; Simon Boleyn; William Boleyn KB; Anne (Boleyn) Heydon and Isabel (Boleyn) Cheyne.

William Boleyn KB [(b.1449, Blickling Norfolk – Oct 10, 1505 Hever Kent, England)] mar. Margaret (Butler) Boleyn [b.1454 in Ormonde, Kerry, Ireland – d. Apr 3, 1537 in Hever, Kent, England]

10 children:

Anne Boleyn; Anthony Boleyn; Thomas Boleyn KG; Anne (Boleyn) Shelton; James Boleyn Kt; Edward Boleyn Kt; Amata (Boleyn) Calthorpe; Alice (Boleyn) Clere; William Boleyn; Margaret (Boleyn) Sackville.

*William Boleyn was appointed a Knight of the Bath by King Richard III

Thomas Boleyn KG [b. 1477 in Blickling, Norfolk, England – d. Mar 12, 1539 in Hever Castle, Kent England also known as Sir Thomas, 1st Earl of Wiltshire mar. Elizabeth (Howard) Boleyn [b. 1480 Norfolk, England – d. Apr 3, 1537]

3 surviving children:

Mary (Boleyn) Stafford; Anne, Queen of England; George Boleyn.

Anne Boleyn [b. 1501 in Blickling Hall, Blickling, Norfolk, England – d.May 19, 1536 in Tower of London, England. Also known as Anne “Queen of England” Boleyn or Bullen mar. Henry (Tudor) of England

1 child: Elizabeth I;

Are there any direct descendants of Anne Boleyn?

Anne Boleyn is known to have one spouse, Henry Tudor of England. They had one child who survived infancy. Elizabeth, was born on September 7, 1533. Queen Anne fell pregnant in 1934 and 1536 but both were stillborn. Therefore, Elizabeth was the only child of King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn.

Queen Elizabeth I | The Boleyn Lineage
Queen Elizabeth I | Image: © royal.uk

Elizabeth succeeded to the throne in November 1558 when her half-sister, Mary Tudor (1516 – 1558) died and became Elizabeth Tudor England. She was Queen of England and Ireland from September 17, 1558 until March 24, 1603 when she died. Queen Elizabeth was a popular queen and her 45-year reign is said to be one of the best in history. She is sometimes called the Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess. Queen Elizabeth never married, hence the nickname, the ‘Virgin Queen’. She was the last of the five monarchs of the House of Tudor, and with no heir to the throne, effectively ending the Tudor reign. This also means that there are no direct descendants of Anne Boleyn.

The Boleyn Lineage – Coat of Arms of the Boleyn Family

The Boleyn Family | Coats of Arms | The Boleyn Lineage

Three bulls heads on a white field.

Place and Country of origin: Norfolk, England.

Founded: 1283

Founder: John Boleyn

Final head: Thomas Boleyn – Marchioness of Pembroke;

-Earl of Wiltshire;

-Earl of Ormond;

-Viscount Rochford.

Dissolution: 1539


The Boleyn Lineage – after Anne Boleyn – from 1536 to present day, 2021

As we know there are no direct descendants of Anne Boleyn. However, research has shown that the Boleyn lineage can be traced to the present day royal family. Whilst this article is not designed to trace the wider lineage of the Boleyn family, it will give you an overview of how the present day royal family is connected to the Boleyn family.

For ease of understanding, we shall return to Anne Boleyn’s family and begin the Boleyn lineage from one of Thomas Boleyn’s children.

We know that Anne Boleyn was one of three siblings born to Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire and Elizabeth (Howard) Boleyn. Anne’s older sibling was Mary Boleyn (mistress to Henry VIII for some time) and her younger sibling, George Boleyn (who was executed on May 17, 1536, 2 days before Anne Boleyn’s execution). There are no other surviving children of Thomas Boleyn. This means Mary Boleyn was the only survivor of the Thomas Boleyn’s children.

Recommended read: Anne Boleyn – The most magnetic and enduring of Tudor Queens.

Follow the highlighted trail from Mary (Boleyn) Stafford, the older sibling to Anne and see where it leads…

Thomas Boleyn KG [b. 1477 in Blickling, Norfolk, England – d. Mar 12, 1539 in Hever Castle, Kent England also known as Sir Thomas, 1st Earl of Wiltshire mar. Elizabeth (Howard) Boleyn [b. 1480 Norfolk, England – d. Apr 3, 1537]

3 surviving children:

Mary (Boleyn) Stafford; Anne, Queen of England; George Boleyn.

Mary (Boleyn) Stafford also known as Carey. [b.1499 in Blickling, Norfolk, England – d. July 19, 1543 in Chilton Folis, Wiltshire, England.

Mary married Sir William Carey [on Feb 4, 1521 in Greenwich, London.

2 children:

Catherine Carey – Lady Knollys; Henry Carey – 1st Baron Hunsdon;

About Mary (Boleyn) (Carey) Stafford:

*Mary was a mistress to Henry VIII for some time and some believe that Catherine Carey and Henry Carey were Henry VIII’s children.

*William Carey died of sweating sickness on June 23, 1528 leaving Mary a widow with two young children.

In 1534, Mary fell in love with William Stafford KB and they married in secret, without the approval of the King or her father, Thomas Boleyn. As a result, Mary was banished from the royal court and fell into disfavour.

Mary and William Stafford had 2 children: Edward Stafford (1535 – 1545) and Anne Stafford (1536-?)

Mary did reconcile with her father who allowed her to live at Rochford Hall, Essex.

The Boleyn Lineage – Catherine Carey

Follow the highlighted names from Catherine Carey’s daughter, Lettice Knollys and see where it leads…

Catherine (Carey) Knollys, later Lady Knollys (b. 1524 – d. January 15, 1569), first cousin to Queen Elizabeth I mar. Sir Francis Knollys

15 children:

Henry (1541); Mary (1542); Lettice (1543); William (1545); Edward (1546); Maud (1548); Elizabeth (1549); Robert (1550); Richard (1552); Francis (1553); Ann (1554); a child unbaptised (1557); Thomas (1558); Catherine (1559); Dudley (1562).

Lettice Knollys (b.1543 – d.1634)

Wife of Walter Deveraux, 1st Earl of Essex (b. Sept 16, 1539 – d. Sept 22 1576);

Wife of Robert Dudley MP (b.Jun 24, 1532 – d. Sept 4, 1588);

Wife of Christopher Blount MP (b. 1565 – d. Mar 18, 1601);

Mother to > Penelope (Deveraux) Blount (b.Jan 1563 – d. Jul 7 1607); Dorothy (Deveraux) Percy (b. 1564 – d. Aug 3, 1619); Robert Deveraux KG (Nov 10, 1566 – Feb 25, 1601); Walter (Deveraux) le Deveraux (b. 1570 – d. 1591); Robert Dudley (b. Jun 6, 1581 – d. 1584)

Robert Devereux KG, 2nd Earl of Essex (Nov 10, 1566 – Feb 25, 1601); mar. Frances Walsingham

Children: 2

Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex (b.Jan 22 1591 – d. Sept 14, 1646); Lady Frances Devereux (b. Sept 20 1599 – d. Nov 23 1679)

Lady Frances Devereux (b. Sept 20 1599 – d. Nov 23 1679) mar. William Seymour, 2nd Duke of Somerset, 3rd Earl of Hertford

Children: 8

William Seymour (b.1621 – d. Jun 16 1642); Robert Seymour (b. 1622 – d. 1645/46); Henry Seymour, Baron Beauchamp of Hache (b.1626 – d. Mar 30 1654); Lady Mary Seymour (b. 1637 – d. Apr 10 1673); Jane Seymour (b. 1637 – d. Nov 1679); Frances Seymour (b. 1642 – ?); John Seymour, 4th Duke of Somerset (b. 1646 – d. Apr 29 1675) .

Jane Seymour (b. 1637 – d. Nov 1679);

Wife of: Charles Boyle, 3rd Viscount of Dungarven;

Wife of: William James Edwards II

Mother of: Arabella (Boyle) Petty; Richard Boyle; Henry Boyle; Elizabeth (Boyle) Barry; Mary (Boyle) Douglas; Charles Boyle, 2nd Earl of Burlington; Robert Edwards Sr.

Charles Boyle, 2nd Earl of Burlington (1673 – 1703); mar. Juliana (Noel) Boyle

Children: 4

Juliana (Boyle) Bruce; Elizabeth (Boyle) Bedingfeld; Richard Boyle 3rd Earl of Burlington; Henrietta Boyle

Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington (1695 – 1753) mar. Dorothy Savile

Children: 3

Dorothy Boyle; Juliana Boyle; Charlotte Elizabeth Boyle.

Charlotte Elizabeth (Boyle) Cavendish (Oct 1731 – December 1754) mar. William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire

Children: 4

William Cavendish, 5th Duke of Devonshire; Dorothy Cavendish; George Augustus Henry Cavendish, 1st Earl of Burlington;

From 1750s – 1900s

Dorothy (Cavendish) Cavendish-Bentinck (Aug 1750 – Jun 1794) mar. William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland

Children: 6

William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, Duke of Portland; Lord William Cavendish Bentinck; Charlotte Cavendish Bentinck; Mary Bentinck; William Charles Augustus Bentinck; Frederick Cavendish Bentinck

William Charles Augustus Bentinck, Lord Cavendish Lieutenant Colonel ;

Husband of: Georgiana Augusta Frederica (Seymour) Cavendish-Bentinck

1 child:

Georgiana Augusta Frederica Henrietta Cavendish-Bentinck