The Boleyn Family | Who were they and What happened to them after Anne’s death

The Boleyn Family

The Boleyn family was one of the most respected and prominent family in English aristocracy. They reached the peak of their influence during Tudor rule when Anne Boleyn, the daughter to Thomas Boleyn and Elizabeth Howard became the second wife, Queen consort to King Henry VIII in 1533. Then in 1536, an incomprehensible tragedy fell upon them. The Boleyn family were almost destroyed! Two members of the family had their lives put to death and three fundamentally damaged.

This is their story.

This article on the Boleyn Family forms part of a series of articles on the History of Britain as an easy read on Sundays

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

The Boleyn Family

In 1536, on the morning of May 19, a young courageous woman, dressed in a black robe and a white ermine trim was taken to the scaffold in Tower Green that was specially built for her. She was mercilessly executed by a single swipe of a sword by a skilled French swordsman on charges of adultery, incest, treason and witchcraft. She was not even given a coffin. She was wrapped in a white cloth, placed in an old elm chest, and buried at the Tower Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula.

This woman was Anne Boleyn.

Anne Boleyn

“Anna Bollein Queen” by Hans Holbein

Anne Boleyn was one of the three surviving children of Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, and 1st Earl of Ormonde and Elizabeth Howard, daughter of Thomas Howard, the 2nd Duke of Norfolk. Her siblings were Mary, older to Anne and George, her younger brother. Anne is said to be an intelligent, witty, proud and a principled individual.

Anne Boleyn | Early years and Education

Anne spent her early years at Hever Castle, the Boleyns family home before she went to Netherlands and France. Anne received good education, typical for woman of her status. She spoke French fluently and she dressed well, bringing French fashion to the English court. She also learnt music, dance and singing along with archery, horseback riding and hunting.

Anne Boleyn | Marriage

Anne Boleyn married King Henry VIII officially on June 1 1933 in an elaborate ceremony followed by a banquet and became queen consort. She was pregnant at that time and gave birth to Elizabeth on September 7 1533. Elizabeth would later inherit the throne and become Queen Elizabeth I. However, Henry desperately wanted a male heir, and he soon fell for Jane Seymour, Anne’s cousin.

Anne Boleyn | Charges, Trial and Execution

In May of 1536, Anne was arrested, charged with incest, adultery with four men, treason and witchcraft. She was taken to the Tower of London to await her trial. The charges were instigated by her former friend, Thomas Cromwell. These charges sat well with the King also as he wanted to be rid of Anne as well. Anne was found guilty on all counts at a trial held on May 15 1536.

Read the full story here – Anne Boleyn | The most magnificent of Tudor Queens.

Thomas Boleyn | 1st Earl of Wiltshire, 1st Earl of Ormonde (1477-1539)

Thomas Boleyn | Wikidata

Thomas Boleyn was an English nobleman, a diplomat and a politician. He was made Knight of the Garter in 1523, Viscount Rochford in 1525 and Earl of Wiltshire and Earl of Ormond in 1529. Father to Anne Boleyn (r. 1533-1536) and maternal grandfather to Queen Elizabeth I (r. 1558-1603).

Born in 1477 at Blickling Manor in Norfolk, Thomas Boleyn was the son of Sir William Boleyn (1451-1505) of Blickling and Lady Margaret Butler (1454-1539), daughter of Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond.

Blickling was owned by Sir William’s father, Sir Geoffrey Boleyn a wealthy London merchant who served as Lord Mayor of London. He purchased the manor of Blickling, Norfolk in 1452 from Sir John Fastolf. He also came to own Hever Castle in Kent in 1462.

Thomas Boleyn | Career and Marriage

Thomas was an ambitious man who was a successful diplomat and courtier. He was active in the court of Henry VII and in 1503, he escorted Princess Margaret Tudor to Scotland to marry King James IV.

He married Lady Elizabeth Howard, eldest daughter of Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, and they had three surviving children:

Mary Boleyn (c.1499 – July 19 1543)

Anne Boleyn (c.1501 – May 19 1536)

George Boleyn, Viscount Rochford (c.1504 – 17 May 1536).

Thomas Boleyn was said to be a loving father, who had grand ambitions for his children. He ensured each received excellent education, both languages and skills, while he continued to build his reputation at court. While he was an ambassador to the Netherlands, he secured a position for his daughter, Anne at the court of the Archduchess Margaret of Austria.

Later, in 1514, he secured a position for both his daughters to accompany Princess Mary, Henry VIII’s sister to France for her marriage to 52 year old King Louis XII.

Thomas Boleyn | What happened after Anne’s Execution

After the execution of his children, Anne and George in 1536, he was stripped of his titles and removed from royal favour. However, it is said that he was soon back in favour in the royal court. He was active in squashing the rebellion of the Pilgrimage of Grace in 1536. He was invited to Edward VI’s christening in October 1537. By 1538, he was rumoured to marry Margaret Douglas, niece to Henry VIII. When he died, Henry VIII ordered masses to be said for his soul, clear evidence that Thomas Boleyn was back in favour.

Thomas Boleyn | Final days

Before his death, Thomas Boleyn appears to have taken steps to reconcile with his only surviving daughter, Mary Boleyn. He allowed Mary and her husband to live in Rochford Hall in Essex, and upon his death, he left the Rochford estate to Mary.

Thomas Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire died on March 12 1539 at Hever Castle – just under three years after the death of his daughter, Anne and his son, George.

An elaborate memorial brass to Sir Thomas Boleyn at St Peter’s Church, Hever | Photo: Free stock images.

He was laid to rest at St Peter’s Church, Hever. Topped with an elaborate memorial brass depicting Thomas dressed in robe and insignia of a Knight of the Garter, a badge on his left breast and a garter around his left knee. The inscription on his tomb reads:

“Here lieth Sir Thomas Bullen, Knight of the Order of the Garter, Erle of Wilscher and Erle or Ormunde, which deceased the 12th dai of Marche in the iere of our Lorde 1538”

His tomb still survives today.

Note: the date of death is 1538 because the Tudor calendar started on March 25, and not January 1.

If you visit Hever, visit also Hever Castle, home to the Boleyn family, childhood home of Anne Boleyn, and St Peter’s Church.

St Peter’s Church dates back to 12th century and is open daily throughout the year. Worship has been held here for over 875 years with Sunday services said in Traditional Language.

St Peter’s Church is located next to Hever Castle, in the heart of Hever, Kent.

Elizabeth Howard Boleyn, Countess of Wiltshire (1486-1538)

Believed to be Elizabeth Howard Boleyn

Elizabeth Boleyn, Countess of Wiltshire was an English noblewoman, born in Arundel Castle, Sussex, the eldest daughter to Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk and his first wife, Elizabeth Tilney. She was a direct descendant of King Edward I of England. Mother to Mary, Anne, George and maternal grandmother to Queen Elizabeth I. She is said to be of proud and ambitious in character.

Elizabeth Howard Boleyn | Relationship with her children

Not much is known of Elizabeth Boleyn except that she was a lady-in-waiting to Elizabeth of York, the mother of King Henry VIII. When Henry VIII was crowned King of England, she was again appointed lady-in-waiting to his queen, Catherine of Aragon.

Elizabeth Boleyn’s relationship with her daughter Mary, was a strained one, probably because of Mary’s unchaste behaviour. In contrast, her relationship with daughter Anne, is said to be a positive one. They shared a special bond and Elizabeth took an interest in Anne’s early education when they were at Hever Castle. Anne was taught music, singing, and dancing. Anne also became an expert at embroidery and enjoyed poetry under her mother’s guidance.

Elizabeth was a regular at court and acted as a chaperone to Anne and Henry during their courtship. She was present at her daughter’s coronation ceremony in 1533 and possibly rode in the first carriage with the Dowager Duchess, Anne’s step-grandmother (Ives, p. 177).

When Anne was taken to the Tower of London to await her trial, she was heard to exclaim, “Oh, my mother, thou wilt die with sorrow” (Weir, p. 317-319).

After the execution of her children, Anne and George, on charges of incest and treason, Elizabeth and her husband retired to Hever Castle.

Elizabeth Howard Boleyn | Her final days

Elizabeth died on April 3 1538. She is said to have suffered from a cough and cold, but it is believed she died of a broken heart. After Mary Boleyn’s disgrace and banishment from court, losing her children, Anne and George by execution for treason and incest, her husband striped off of his titles, it is more likely that she may have died of a broken heart. She died in a property near Baynard’s Castle, home to the Abbot of Reading. She was buried in the Howard aisle of St Mary’s Church, Lambeth on April 7 1538.

St Mary’s Church located next to Lambeth Palace, was decommissioned in 1972. It is now called the Garden Museum which re-opened in 2017.

The Garden Museum dates from the medieval era to present day. The Garden Museum was founded by Rosemary and John Nicholson in 1977 in order to rescue the abandoned church of St Mary’s at Lambeth, which was due for demolition. The church is the burial place of John Tradescant (c1570 – 1638), the first great gardener and plant-hunter in British history. His magnificent and enigmatic tomb is the centre-piece of the Sackler Garden, designed to reflect Tradescant’s life and spirit.

Garden Museum

Address: 5 Lambeth Palace Rd, South Bank, London SE1 7LB

Elizabeth’s grave is not visible. It is under the wooden floor of the museum gift shop. The exact location is uncertain also as the memorial brass which marked the spot is now lost.

Mary Boleyn | Lady Mary Boleyn (c.1499-1543)

Mary Boleyn

Mary Boleyn was the older sister to Anne Boleyn, King Henry VIII Queen consort.

Mary Boleyn | Education and Career

She was likely to have been educated alongside her sister, Anne and her brother, George at Hever Castle, Kent and given the education essential for young ladies of her rank and status. She was accomplished in dancing, embroidery, etiquette, household management, music, needlework, and singing along with games of chess, archery, falconry, riding and hunting.

Mary remained in England for most of her childhood. Her first trip abroad was in 1514 when she accompanied Princess Mary to France who was marrying King Louis XII. When King Louis XII died just three days after being married, most of the Queen’s maids were sent away but Mary remained.

Mary is said to have had an affair with King Francis I of France for some period between 1515 and 1519. She returned to England thereafter and was appointed lady-in-waiting to Catherine of Aragon, queen consort to Henry VIII.

She was one of Henry’s mistresses for a period of time before Henry fell in love with her sister, Anne.

Mary Boleyn | Marriage and Children

As a way to concealing Mary’s affair with King Henry VIII, and her shameful banishment from France’s court, she was married off to William Carey, a gentleman of the Privy Chamber. Mary and William had a son, Henry Carey. However, William sadly contracted the ‘sweating disease’ and died, leaving Mary with considerable debt. Henry VIII granted Anne Boleyn ward-ship of her nephew, whom she ensured was educated at a Catholic monastery. Anne also ensured that Mary received an annual pension.

In 1534, Mary secretly married William Stafford, a soldier, a status considered to be far below her own. When her marriage was discovered, her family disowned her and was also banished from the royal court. Her financial circumstances became desperate but is reported she admittedly saying:

“I had rather beg my bread with him than to be the greatest queen in Christendom. And I believe verily…he would not forsake me to be a king”

Anne stepped in to help her with some money but did not reinstate her to the court. This seems to be the closest they came to reconciling after Mary’s exile from the king’s court. There are no records of Mary between 1534 and Anne’s execution in 1536, or any records of visits with her parents or her siblings when they were imprisoned.

Mary and her father, Thomas Boleyn reconciled to some extent before he passed. Mary inherited the Rochford Hall and the Rochford Estate in Essex. .

Mary Boleyn is recorded to have four children, two carrying the name Carey and two by her second marriage, Stafford.

Catherine Carey (1524-1569) was lady-in-waiting to Anne of Cleves and Catherine Howard. Married Sir Francis Knollys, Knight of the Garter in 1540. She became lady of bedchamber to her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I. Her daughter, Lettice Knollys, was second wife to Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I.

Henry Carey 1st Baron Hunsdon (1526-1596), Knight of the Garter. Married to Anne Morgan and they had sixteen children. Anne Morgan was appointed to the office of Keeper of Somerset House, by Queen Elizabeth I of England.

Edward Stafford (1535-1545)

Anne Stafford (1536-unknown)

It was rumoured that Catherine Carey and Henry Carey were Henry VIII children, but there is no evidence to suggest that the King was the biological father.

Mary Boleyn Stafford | Final days

Mary Boleyn Stafford died of unknown causes on either on July 19 or July 30 1543 – the exact date is unknown. She is known to have spent her last days at Rochford Hall. However, her final resting place is unknown and remains a mystery.

George Boleyn | 2nd Viscount Rochford (c.1503-May 17 1536)

Possibly George Boleyn | Wikidata

An English nobleman and courtier, he played a prominent role in politics in the early 1530s. He is said to be intelligent, persuasive, proud and arrogant in character. He was accused of incest with his sister, Anne Boleyn, queen consort of Henry VIII. He was beheaded on May 17 1536.

Only son of Thomas Boleyn and his wife, Elizabeth Howard Boleyn, George Boleyn was born in Blickling Hall circa 1503. His first couple of years was spent at Blickling estate, but the Boleyn family moved to Hever Castle, Kent in 1505 when Thomas Boleyn inherited the castle from his father, Sir William Boleyn.

George Boleyn | Education, Career Marriage

George received excellent education. Along with his sisters, he spoke French fluently. He also mastered Italian and Latin. George is thought to have stayed in England for most of his early years.

George’s diplomatic career took off in late 1529 when he was knighted. He undertook the courtesy title of Viscount Rochford. At the young age of 25, he undertook his first ambassadorial mission to France. In total, he undertook six missions, with the final being in May 1935 where he negotiated a marriage contract between the King of France’s third son, Charles II of Orleans and his niece, baby Princess Elizabeth. In addition to his diplomatic skills, George was much admired for his linguistic and poetic talent.

George married Jane Parker in 1524. There are not much information on Jane or if they had any children but it is thought that Jane may have played a role in the judgments against George.

George Boleyn | Charges, Trial and Execution

On May 2 1536, George was arrested on charges of incest and treason and stood trial on May 15 1536. Anne was tried a few hours before George and was found guilty. As Anne was found guilty of incest, amongst other charges, before George, he could hardly be acquitted. According to trial papers, George is said to have put forward an incredible defence and many thought that he would be acquitted. There was no evidence of incest and George was convicted on a presumption.

On the morning of May 17, 1536, George along with the other four who were accused to have adulterous affairs with Anne Boleyn, were led to Tower Hill scaffold to be beheaded. George Boleyn was the first to be beheaded.

George Boleyn | Final speech

On the scaffold, George delivered a lengthy speech. Several versions of this speech exist and the following is appended from Chronicles of Calais, taken from Weir, p243.

Christian men, I am born under the law and judged under the law, and die under the law, and the law has condemned me. Masters all, I am not come hither for to preach, but for to die, for I have deserved to die if I had twenty lives, more shamefully than can be devised, for I am a wretched sinner, and I have sinned shamefully. I have known no man so evil, and to rehearse my sins openly, it were no pleasure to you to hear them, nor yet for me to rehearse them, for God knoweth all. Therefore, masters all, I pray you take heed by me, and especially my lords and gentlemen of the court, the which I have been among, take heed by me and beware of such a fall, and I pray to God the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, three persons and one God, that my death may be an example unto you all. And beware, trust not in the vanity of the world, and especially in the flattering of the court. And I cry God mercy, and ask all the world forgiveness of God. And if I have offended any man that is not here now, either in thought, word or deed, and if ye hear any such, I pray you heartily in my behalf, pray them to forgive me for God’s sake. And yet, my masters all, I have one thing for to say to you: men do common and say that I have been a setter forth of the Word of God, and one that have favoured the Gospel of Christ; and because I would not that God’s word should be slandered by me, I say unto you all, that if I had followed God’s word in deed as I did read it and set it forth to my power, I had not come to this. If I had, I had been a liv[ing] man among you. Therefore I pray you, masters all, for God’s sake stick to the truth and follow it, for one good follower is worth three readers, as God knoweth.  

Weir, p243

George Boleyn endured three strokes of the axe before his head was completely severed. He is buried in the Tower Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula.

As brave as he might have been on that scaffold, it is difficult to imagine what George would have gone through – a young, successful, happy, proud and arrogant English nobleman reduced a criminal in a matter of days for crimes he did not commit. Much worse were what the other four ordinary men went through watching George being beheaded while awaiting their turn. Their mutilated bodies, striped off their clothes, loaded onto a cart and taken to their graves.

May George Boleyn along with Norris, Weston, Brereton and Smeaton are now rest in peace, far away from the earthly injustice bestowed upon them.

Thoughts…

In less than eight years since Anne Boleyn became Queen of England and Ireland, bringing with it the influence, the success, wealth and the ennoblement that Thomas Boleyn sought and enjoyed, the Boleyn family were virtually destroyed. None of the immediate family exist. The gruesome beheading, the lost of Anne Boleyn and George Boleyn must have broken Elizabeth who died less than two years later. As for Thomas Boleyn, who although returned to court, he too would have been a broken man having lost his entire family except for Mary who was estranged, and herself passed about four years later.

Are there any survivors of the Boleyn family around today?

The Boleyn Family
The Boleyn Family | Coats of Arms

The short answer is, I do not know but there probably are under a different surname, inherited through marriages etc. Below is what I found out, with a look at how it all began with the Boleyns and how they may be around today.

The Boleyns are said to be the direct descendants of Charles the Great (Charles I) who was the King of the Franks in 768 AD and King of the Lombards in 774. He was also King of the Romans in 800.

For the Boleyns, it all began with Sir Geoffrey Boleyn (1406-1453) who was a successful merchant in London. He became the Lord Mayor of London and purchased the Blickling Estate in Norfolk in 1452 and Hever Castle in 1462.

Sir Geoffrey’s son, William Boleyn followed in his father’s footsteps. He was a successful merchant and Lord Mayor of London. Sir William Boleyn (1451-1505) married Lady Margaret Butler and they had three children – Anne, Thomas and James.

Thomas Boleyn, son to Sir William and Lady Margaret, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, 1st Earl of Ormonde married Elizabeth Howard and they had three surviving children, Mary, Anne and George, whose fate, we already know.

George Boleyn married Jane Parker and there are no evidence that they had any children.

Anne Boleyn married King Henry VIII and they had one child, Elizabeth. Elizabeth went on to inherit the throne in 1533 to become Queen Elizabeth I, Queen of England and Ireland. She did not marry and did not have any children. She was queen until her death, in 1603.

Mary Boleyn married twice, and had two children with each of her marriage.

Mary’s first marriage was to William Carey in 1520 and they had two children, Catherine Carey, Lady Knollys and Henry Carey, 1st Baron of Hunsdon. Mary’s second marriage was to William Stafford in 1534 and they had two children, Anne Stafford and Edward Stafford. Unfortunately, both of the Stafford children passed at a very young age. This means, the only surviving children were the Careys.

Catherine Carey, married Sir Francis Knollys in 1540 and they had fourteen children. Henry Carey married Anne Morgan and they had sixteen children.

So, there you have it! It is likely that the Boleyn lineage is still out there through the Careys or some other surnames through marriage. Just so you know, on the anniversary of Anne Boleyn’s death each year, the Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula Royal Chapel in the Tower of London where Anne Boleyn was finally laid to rest receives a bouquet of flowers sent anonymously. This tradition has been carried on for a century. Make of it what you will – is it from a Boleyn out there or could it be just a kind soul paying tribute to a queen who was so wronged by the society she lived in.

History of Britain

If you love to know more on the history of Britain, you may also enjoy reading the following:

Stonehenge | A sophisticated architecture

Tower of London | Best guide

Queen Victoria | The Woman behind the Crown

As you may already know, the history of Britain is fascinating, intriguing and there is still so much we would love to know. These historical information adds value to our visits to some of the castles and historic buildings that still stands. As well, there are numerous authors who have written on the many aspects of our history which gives us a number of versions to ponder upon. The dates and some events may lack precise accuracy due to lack of documentary evidence. One such example, as we have seen with Anne Boleyn, where all her portraits and memorabilia were destroyed. It was illegal to own any during the reign of King Henry VIII.

In writing this article on the Boleyn family, as well as all related articles to Anne Boleyn, I have used the resources listed below in my research to ensure the information contained herein is as accurate as it can possibly be.

Articles in the History of Britain which you may like to read also

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BEAUCHAMP TOWER
Forgotten stories of 3 royal prisoners at queen's house
Bloody Tower at the Tower of London

I sincerely hope that this article has been valuable to you in knowing more on the history of Britain and enhance your visits to Tower of London, Hever Castle, Blickling Estate in Norfolk, Hampton Court Palace and more. Subscribe now, so you are the first to know of the latest on Timeless Travel Steps.

Georgina xx

The Boleyn Family | Coats of Arms
Coats of Arms of the Boleyn Family | Founded 1283 by John Boleyn. Dissolution in 1539 upon death of Thomas Boleyn

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RESOURCES

Bruce, M. L. Anne Boleyn, 1982.

Fraser, A. The Six Wives of Henry VIII, 1992.

Ives, E. The Life and Death of Anne Boleyn, 2004.

Starkey, D. Six Wives: The Queens of Henry VIII, 2003.

Warnicke, R. The Rise and Fall of Anne Boleyn, 1989.

Weir, A. The Six Wives of Henry VIII, 2007.

Wilkinson, J. Mary Boleyn: The True Story of Henry VIII’s Favourite Mistress, 2009.Mary Boleyn: The Mistress of Kings by Alison Weir (2011)

The Mistresses of Henry VIII by Kelly Hart (2009)

Mary Boleyn: The True Story of Henry VIII’s Mistress by Josephine Wilkinson (2010

Wikipedia

annebolyenfiles


The Boleyn family was one of the most respected and prominent family in English aristocracy. Find out what happened to them via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/The Boleyn family was one of the most respected and prominent family in English aristocracy. Find out what happened to them via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Books on Prisoners of the Bloody Tower | Intriguing tales of Prisoners of the Bloody Tower

Books on Prisoners of the Bloody Tower | Intriguing tales of Prisoners of the Bloody Tower

Audible: audiobooks, podcasts & audio stories – Free Download Available Instantly


About the Bloody Tower at Tower of London

Built in the early 1220s as access gateway to the Thames, the Bloody Tower was originally known as the Garden Tower because it was next to the Constable’s garden. The Tower was not intended to be a prison but it became home to a number of prisoners, notably Sir Walter Raleigh and the two princes. The tower gained its reputation in the 16th century as the Bloody Tower when the notorious murders of the princes, Edward V and Richard Duke of York that supposedly took place within the walls of the tower were discovered. To learn more about the Bloody Tower, navigate to The Bloody Tower at the Tower of London, while on this page, there are carefully selected and recommended reading items – books on the prisoners of the Bloody Tower should you wish to delve deeper into learning more about the famous prisoners that resided here, Sir Walter Raleigh and the royal princes.

*Scroll all the way to the bottom of the page

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

Sir Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh
Walter Raleigh, © akg-images / De Agostini Picture Library

Walter Raleigh (also spelled as Ralegh) was an English gentleman, writer, poet, adventurer, politician, courtier and a soldier who introduced ‘potato’ to the English dinner tables. A charming nobleman, he was one of the most famous explorers during the reign of Elizabeth I. He pioneered the colonisation of North America and helped defend England against the Spainish Armada. Raleigh was rewarded handsomely by the Queen and received his knighthood in 1585.

When Queen Elizabeth I died, James I succeeded to the throne in 1603 who imprisoned Raleigh at the Tower of London. While confined to the walls of the Tower, he wrote ‘History of the World‘. In 1616, Raleigh was released to head an expedition to South America, during which his men attacked a Spanish settlement. He was forced to abandon his mission. Upon his return, he was imprisoned at the Bloody Tower to appease the Spaniards until his beheading in 1618.

Suggested reading: Bloody Tower at the Tower of London

Below is a selection of books, some written by Walter Raleigh himself which are available as reprints and some books written about him. Enjoy perusing each of the carefully selected books to learn more of this infamous adventurer. You can purchase them as Paperback, Hardcover or instant download on Kindle.

Books on Sir Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh: In Life and Legend Kindle Edition – by Mark Nicholls +  P. Williams  

The Poems of Sir Walter Raleigh: Now First Collected (Classic Reprint) Paperback – 27 Jun. 2012

The Roanake Voyages 1584-1590: Vol II: English Voyages to North America Paperback – 28 Mar. 2003

The Letters Of Sir Walter Ralegh Hardcover – Illustrated, 1 July 1999


Sir Walter Raleigh 174 Success Facts – Everything You Need to Know about Sir Walter Raleigh Paperback – 5 Jun. 2014

The Discoverie of the Large, Rich and Bewtiful Empyre of Guiana by Sir Walter Raleigh (Exploring Travel) Paperback – 4 Dec. 1997

An Abridgment Of Sir Walter Raleigh’s History Of The World: In Five Books (1698) Paperback – 10 Sept. 2010

Sir Walter Raleigh A Biography Kindle Edition. Also available in Paperback and Hardcover

Click on the images to view the synopsis and Buy on Amazon


The Princes – Edward V and Richard Duke of York

The two princes, Edward and his younger brother, Richard mysteriously disappeared in 1483 from the Bloody Tower. The princes, sons of Edward IV were brought to the Tower by their uncle and Lord Protector, Duke of Gloucester for their ‘own protection’. Duke of Gloucester later became King Richard III. The princes were never seen alive again.

Below is a list of books written on the mysterious disappearance and the sinister plot that may have transpired during this fifteen century era. There are various opinions as to who was responsible for their disappearance and/or murder. This mystery remains unsolved till today.

Books on the Missing Princes at the Tower

Richard III and the Princes in the Tower Paperback – 7 Aug. 2014 by Alison Weir

The Survival of the Princes in the Tower: Murder, Mystery and Myth Kindle Edition by Matthew Lewis (Also available in Paperback and Hardback)

The Mythology of the ‘Princes in the Tower‘ Kindle Edition by John Ashdown-Hill (Available in Paperback and Hardback as well)

The Princes in the Tower : Cold Case Re-opened Kindle Edition by Mark Garber (Available as Audiobook as well)

The Killer of the Princes in the Tower: A New Suspect Revealed Hardcover – 30 Jun. 2021

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The Princes in the Tower: Did Richard III Murder His Nephews, Edward V & Richard of York? Kindle Edition by Josephine Wilkinson

Richard III and the Princes in the Tower: The Possible Fates of Edward V and Richard of York Paperback – Illustrated, 30 Oct. 2016 by Gerald Prenderghast

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Click on the images to view synopsis and Buy on Amazon


What do you think of the selection above? Have you read any of these books? I sincerely hope that the selection is valuable to you in knowing more about British History and in particular about the Tower of London. Do share your thoughts in comments below. The following related articles may also be of value to you in planning your visit to the Tower of London.

Tower of London-The Best Guide to What you need to know

Tower of London-The Best Guide to What you need to know

A fortress, royal palace and an infamous prison

View of Tower Bridge from the grounds of Tower of London © mytimelessfootsteps | georgina_daniel

The Tower of London

Tower of London is one of the most visited castles and tourist attraction in Britain with 2.86 million visitors in 2018. With such popularity and often referred as a “fortress, royal palace and an infamous prison”, I had wondered of its continued significance and how much of the past history or traditions the Tower continues to exhibit. My thoughts were spurred on as I retrace my footsteps on the royal palaces as part of my 3rd instalment in London Series, MyCityMyTown, retracing my footsteps – Royal Palaces and Royal Parks which this article represents.

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

What is known about the Tower of London

Entrance to the Tower of London | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

I had always known that the Tower was historically important, built by the Normans after the 1066 invasion and it was once occupied by reigning monarchs. In 1988 it was recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Given it’s historical importance and it’s popularity, the Tower offers various activities throughout the day to entertain visitors, both young and old. As a visitor on previous occasions, I had gone along with the flow, joining in the activities and observing without really giving it much thought. I don’t think I had even seen ALL of the towers and castle grounds! So, my re-visit on this occasion was an opportunity to see, explore, discover and learn more of this magnificent castle. I share my experiences in this article in the hope that you would find this to be the Best Guide to What You Need to Know about the Tower of London.

What I discovered about the Tower

In a nutshell, my visit was a whole new world of discovery! It was all too much to ignore and for me to try to condense it into one post will not do justice to English history and to this monument or to you, as reader of this article and/or as a visitor to the Tower of London. Therefore, I address the Tower’s historical significance in this article which is the Best Guide to What you need to know about the Tower of London together with links dotted throughout the article where you can navigate for a more informative post on that particular section.

This may seem like taking a step into history but I think it is a much needed one to help you fully immerse yourself in the context of the Tower’s 1,000 years of history.

I shall address “The traditions at the Tower of London” which will be published in a future article.

My visit to the Tower of London was yet another perfect opportunity for me to use the HRP annual membership and not pay an entry fee.

Best Guide to What you need to know about the Tower of London

The Tower of London has been many things during its life. Today, a visit to the Tower of London along River Thames allows a visitor to discover its many layers of history. I shall limit my contribution to the areas famously attributed to the castle as a “fortress, royal palace and an infamous prison”.

Tower of London as a “fortress, royal palace and an infamous prison”

My starting point was to look at the Tower’s significance today as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and trace it’s history to understand what factors contributed to its recognition as an iconic monument.

1 | The Tower of London is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site

The Tower of London is of Outstanding Universal Value and gained its recognition as a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1988. Through my research, I discovered that this 11th century fortress is the most complete castle still remaining in Europe. The Tower reflects the last military conquest of England, thus symbolic of royal power since 1066. It’s imposing architecture, it’s strategic sitting on River Thames and it’s many layers of history stood for protection and control of the City of London as well as the gateway to the new Norman kingdom. The Tower resembles fostering of closer ties with Europe, language and culture.

As a symbol of royal power, the Tower of London has an interesting history that goes way back to medieval England.

2 | The Tower of London is a historical landmark

The primary significance of the Tower of London as a UNESCO Site is that it is a historical landmark with an interesting history that goes way back to the Norman conquest in 1066. 1066 is a popular date/year in Britain’s history and a date/year that is hard to forget. It marks the end of Anglo-Saxon rule and the last successful invasion by force of England, hence the “beginning” of England as we know today.

This historic castle was constructed in the wake of the Norman conquest by William the Conqueror. Since then, the Tower has dominated the pages of English history and London’s skyline. Let’s take a look at how it came about.

Timeless Travel Steps says: Join one of the Beefeater Tours which is FREE. They run for 45 minutes and is filled with facts, gory details and humour. More details in Useful information below.

2.1 The Norman Conquest and the Story of the Tower of London

According to history, castles were at the heart of William of Normandy’s strategy to conquer England. As he captured towns, villages and strategic points, he built castles to secure his acquisitions and as means to provide defensive structures to guard against the Saxons. His conquest can be traced by the castles he built in Pevensey (his first capture), then Dover and Hastings. William won the Battle of Hastings by defeating King Harold, which ended the Anglo Saxon rule of England.

As a victor of the Battle of Hastings meant that William had invaded a country with a population of 2 to 3 million people with only 10,000 men. William had to move very swiftly to take control of England. To gain full control of England, William realised that he first must have control of the City of London, which was a major power centre that held the purse strings of the country.

To learn more of its history while you walk, get an audio guide.

The “Negotiation”

To gain control of the City of London, William negotiated a deal with the leaders of the City – if he was accepted as King of England, he would give the City certain rights that would allow them to function independently as a state within a state. The City leaders accepted the deal. William of Normandy was crowned King William 1st of England in Westminster Abbey on Christmas Day 1066. Having been crowned the King, William wanted to make a statement to the people of England that he is here to stay.

3 | The Tower of London is a fortress

To make that statement, King William ordered the construction of a fortress on a huge mound at the eastern side of the City of London, both to protect London and to show Norman military strength. This fortress would become the Tower of London. William built three fortresses, Baynard’s Castle, Montfichet Castle and the White Tower. Baynard and Montfichet are long gone.

3.1 | The White Tower – The beginning of a fortress

The White Tower, Tower of London .
The White Tower | Tower of London | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

The White Tower is the same White Tower that you see today in the centre of the Tower grounds, with grey turrets and flag pole. Construction of the White Tower began in 1078 and was completed in 1097, eight years after Williams death in Rouen. The White Tower is so named because in those Middle Ages days, it would have been whitewashed to give it a clean, shining and gleaming appearance.

White Tower, Tower of London
The White Tower-the first tower built by the Normans sits in the middle of the Tower of London grounds | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

Visiting the White Tower is an opportunity to witness the sophisticated architecture of the 11th century. It represents the Normans cutting edge military building technology of its time. If you are into details, you will note the depth of the walls, giving this incredible monument the uniqueness as a secure fortress to protect the residents of the castle and deter any invasion.

Admission to the White Tower is included in your entry ticket to the Tower of London. Purchase your ticket here.

3.2 | The Story of the fortress – Tower of London as a fortress

Over the following centuries, a vast complex of twenty separate towers were added, primarily by Henry III in the 1200’s. This phase of extension to the Tower is said to be up to the middle wall, identified by the white drain pipes. The third and final phase of extension is said to be by King Edward in the 1300’s which is the outer wall. This extension can be identified by the black drain pipes. Edward added the moat which became heavily polluted and was drained in the 19th century. These additions included a perimeter wall connecting each tower encircling the castle.

About 20 towers were built over the centuries, to surround the White Tower.
About 21 towers were built over the centuries, to surround the White Tower | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel
The entrance to the Constable Tower at the Tower of London
The entrance to the Constable Tower at the Tower of London. Initially built in 1240, later rebuilt in the 19th century | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

These later additions also displays an intricate architecture. You can notice these on areas surrounding the doorways and the narrow stairs. As you visit each tower, it does give you a feel of Tudor times.

The map below shows the layout of the Tower of London, 21 towers and main structures.

As a fortress, the Tower became the most secure castle of the land.

Tower of London as it stands today.
Tower of London as it stands today | Image: georgina_daniel

4 | The Tower of London as a Royal Palace

The next significance of the Tower of London is that it has always been and still is a Royal Palace. It was and still is the most secure castle in the land. It had protected the royal family in times of war and during rebellions. The White Tower was built not only as a symbol of Norman strength, a fortress but also as a grand palace and served as a royal residence in its early history.

4.1 | Norman Fireplaces

It had four fireplaces to provide sufficient warmth to the residents – like the one in the picture below.

One of the four Norman fireplaces which you can see today in the White Tower | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

The White Tower has four floors – the ground, the first, the second and the third. The first, second and the third floors were designed the same with a large room to the west, and a smaller room in the northeast.

4.2 | A place of Christian worship

As a place of royal residence, King William wanted a place of a Christian worship to be built in the White Tower. Religion was an important part of his royal image, so, a private chapel, St John’s Chapel, was built on the second floor. The Chapel was used for private worship by the royal family for about 900 years and the tower community as well.

The Chapel of St John, White Tower, Tower of London
The Chapel of St John, White Tower, Tower of London | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

The beautiful Romanesque Chapel of St John is the finest of Norman church architecture that exist today. The Chapel is vaulted with a plain arch, four massive columns on either side and four in the apse. Arches are supported by thick, round piers. Its decorations are simple carvings of scallop and leaf designs.

Although the Chapel was built for William the Conqueror, it was not completed before his death. His son, William II was the first royal to use it. In 1240, King Henry III added stained glass windows depicting the Virgin Mary and the Holy Trinity. The chapel was also provided with a gold-painted cross in Henry’s reign. The Chapels current unadorned appearance is reminiscent of how it may have looked in the Norman era.

4.3 | The Tower was the starting point of a Royal procession

The Tower of London was significant as a Royal Palace as early as the 14th century right through to King Charles II (1630-1685) where a royal procession on the coronation of the king was held from the Tower to Westminster Abbey. In addition to being a Royal Palace, it became a menagerie, a treasury, an armoury, and more famously, a prison.

4.4 | A menagerie

A menagerie at the Tower of London

The very first zoo is said to be housed at the Tower of London. For over 600 years, the Tower was home to wild and exotic animals given as royal gifts. The Tower menagerie included lions, polar bear, elephants and tigers.

Learn more about the menagerie here.

4.5 | Royal Mint

The Tower of London was both a treasury and home for the Royal Mint. The Mint made the coins of the realm for over 500 years. The coins were minted from the reign of Edward I (1272-1307) who installed it in a dedicated area within the Tower walls in c1279 until 1810.  The area became famously known as Mint Street.

As one can imagine, back in the day, working at the Mint was a deadly business. It involved using toxic chemicals and working with fiery furnaces to melt the metal. Coins were all made by hand. Health and safety of the workers was not a priority. Loss of fingers and eyes were common. The coins carried the face of the monarch and if anyone were to tamper, forge or shave off the silver from the edges of the coin were punished for treason.

Join one of the Beefeater Tours which is FREE. They run for 45 minutes and is filled with facts, gory details and humour. More details in Useful information below.

5 | The White Tower at the Tower of London is An Armoury

Over the years, the Royal Palace became to be used as a storage facility. The Royal Armoury began life occupying buildings within the Tower, storing arms and artillery even as early as the existence of the White Tower itself. However, the first recorded items to the Tower Armouries was in 1498. Today, you can visit, admire and explore the magnificent collection of royal arms and historical artefacts of armouries in the White Tower. A long flight of spiral staircase from the third floor to the basement takes you to the Storehouse.

The spiral staircase has a lot of steps and rather narrow at some curves. Not wheelchair accessible.

Below are just a few photos to give you an idea of what it looks like.

All images © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

Learn more on the history of the Royal Armouries here

Admission to the Royal Armouries in the White Tower is included in your entry ticket to the Tower of London. You can purchase your ticket here.

6 | The Tower of London is home to the Crown Jewels

As the most secure castle in the land, the fortress as well as a royal palace, The Tower of London was the one place best suited to protect the Crown Jewels. The Tower of London is home to The Jewel House which now guards the Crown Jewels.

St Edward’s Crown – the most important and sacred crown | Image: St Edward’s Crown, 1661.  The magnificent solid gold frame makes it a very heavy and tiring crown to wear, even briefly, as it weighs 2.23kg (nearly 5lbs). © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2001/Prudence Cuming Associates

To learn more about the Crown Jewels and the exhibition, navigate here to Jewel House at the Tower of London.


Timeless Travel Steps: The entry ticket to the Tower of London includes entry to the Jewel House. It is reasonably priced at £25.00 for Adults and £12.50 for Child, valid for one day. Alternatively, if you have an annual HRP membership, your entry is free.

Timeless Travel Steps suggests: Plan your visit to the Jewel House, either first thing in the morning, or towards the end of the day. Anything in between, you may encounter a queue. The Exhibition is on the ground level, no stairs whatsoever! Possibly wheelchair accessible. For accessibility information, navigate to Tower of London

Timeless Travel Steps says: Plan your visit and make the most of your day. Read more on 5 Reasons Why Travel Planning is Important and Pretravel Planning-25 Top Tips for a Stress-free Vacation


Visiting the Jewel House is definitely a highlight and I would highly recommend that you do too. There is more a reason to do so if you were visiting the Tower of London as once in a lifetime occasion/bucket list experience. You would not want to miss walking in the footsteps of history at the Jewel House. Do not let the queue put you off from visiting the Jewel House – just plan your visit and make the most of your day.

Timeless Travel Steps says: Skip the line and buy your entry tickets here for a day. If you want flexibility with time and attractions, over several days, then buy a great value package here.


So far, I have listed the significance of the Tower of London as a fortress and as a palace. Now, lets discover why it is more famously known for stories of those who have gone beyond the walls and never came out – a Prison and a place of torture.

7 | Tower of London as a Prison and a place of Torture – Discover the stories behind the walls of the Tower of London

Besides being a mighty fortress, and a palace, the Tower of London was an infamous prison, a place of torture and executions. The Tower of London was a symbol of fear. Many men and women, including royals and the famous, rich and poor who entered the walls were never returned to the outside world. Some stayed for only a few days, others for many years, uncertain of their faith. Ghosts of many are said to haunt the castle corridors.

Murder and mystery surrounds the Bloody Tower, one of the twenty-one towers that makes up the Tower of London Castle. The Queen’s House and the Beauchamp Tower were used for royals and high-ranking prisoners

The Bloody Tower, Tower of London
The Bloody Tower, Tower of London | Image: georgina_daniel
The Beauchamp Tower, Tower of London is next to the right of the Queen's House. The Dudley's were imprisoned here
The Beauchamp Tower, Tower of London is next to the right of the Queen’s House. The Dudley’s were imprisoned here | Image: georgina_daniel
The Queen's House, Tower of London - Where Lady Jane Grey, Queen Anne Boleyn and Guy Fawkes were help captive.
The Queen’s House, Tower of London

With over 1000 years of history, there are many stories to be told. You will find some of them written in the following articles:

Read more about the Bloody Tower and its prisoners by navigating to Bloody Tower at the Tower of London. As well, learn more about the Forgotten storie royal prisoners at Queen’s House

Timeless Travel Steps says: The torture basement next to Wakefield Tower is signposted but can be easily missed. The entrance is narrow, dark and a few steps down, you will come to face the torture devices. For some it can give the chills. Stands displayed is the RACK torture device and information on SCAVENGER’S DAUGHTER which is another form of torture. Both are extreme. **Personally, I will not recommend for children to visit this basement.


Other points of Interest at the Tower of London which should not be missed

8 | Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula at Tower of London

The Parish church of St Peter ad Vincula in the Inner Ward of the Tower of London is a quaint and unique place of worship with an extraordinary history.

Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula, Tower of London
Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula, Tower of London | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

This Tudor chapel dates from 1520 but it is said that there had been a place of worship at this spot for over a thousand years, predating the White Tower itself. During the Victorian renovations in the 18th century the resting places of Anne Boleyn, Catherine Howard and Lady Jane Grey were discovered in the chancel, near the altar. This led to the chapel gaining its reputation as the “saddest spot on earth”. This discovery led to the permanent memorial for Anne Boleyn and others to be dedicated at Tower Green. The Chapel you see today is the result of extensive renovations carried out in 1970-71 and in 2014.

Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula, Tower of London
Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula, Tower of London

Georgina: There is a certain warmth here despite its sad history. It is airy and seems to have the right amount of light coming through. I noticed not many visitors to the Tower came here possibly because it is tucked away from the other main/touristy parts of the grounds. I would highly recommend that you don’t miss it when you visit.


Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula is open to the public for worships and visits. You can book it for private functions such as baptisms and weddings. Sunday Services at the Chapel: 09:15 a.m. – Holy Communion | 11:00 a.m. – Mattins & Sermon.


9 | The Fusilier Museum at the Tower of London

The building that is the Fusilier Museum at the Tower of London is also home to the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers’ Regimental Headquarters and the Officer’s Mess, where formal dinners take place.

The Fusilier Museum, Tower of London
The Fusilier Museum, Tower of London | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel
The Fusilier Museum, Tower of London
The Fusilier Museum, Tower of London | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was formed on 20th June 1685, when King James II issued a Royal Warrant to raise an infantry force from the existing Tower of London Garrison. The first Commanding Officer was the Constable of the Tower. The Fusiliers’ intended role was to guard the guns at the Tower of London. The force later fought in Belgium and Spain, and in the American War of Independence.

Notable exhibits here are the:

  • 12 Victoria Cross Medals won by the Regiment;
  • The uniform and bearskin of King George V (a former Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment);
  • An Eagle Standard of the 82nd Regiment of the French Line captured by the Royal Fusiliers during the Napoleonic Wars.

Today, garrison duties are undertaken by the Yeoman Warders and a rota made of three London District regiments.


Entry to the Fusilier Museum is included in the entry ticket to the Tower of London. It is reasonably priced at £25.00 and is valid for one day – take a look here. However, you may wish to purchase combined tickets that allows a visit to several attractions over a few days. Personally, I find these combined tickets to be extremely good value for money and offers flexibility that I need over several days. Take a look at one such example for London, here.


10 | St Thomas’ Tower

St Thomas' Tower, Tower of London
St Thomas’ Tower | Tower of London | Image: georgina_daniel

St Thomas’ Tower is one of the three towers that forms the Medieval Palace. The other two are Wakefield Tower and the Lanthorn Tower.  Built by Edward I between 1275-1279, it was formerly a royal residence. Richly decorated, comfortable and grand.

11 | Traitor’s Gate

The Traitor's Gate, Tower of London
Traitors’ Gate | Tower of London | Image: georgina_daniel

Traitors’ Gate was originally called Water Gate. It was built in the late 1270s and was used by Edward I and other royals to get into St. Thomas’s Tower by water. The Tower began to be used as a prison, more so for prisoners accused of treason, who were brought to the Tower by water. The name “Traitor’s Gate” was first used in 1544.

12 | Fun for Family and kids

Explore and discover the 1,000 year old history of the Tower of London on a family fun day out together with your kids – There are activity trails and digital mission which you can complete with your kids. Activity Trails are filled with fun quizzes, activities, facts and illustrations – available throughout the year.

Digital missions are interactive adventures played on a mobile device. Kids can meet characters from history, solve problems by tackling a series of challenges which helps with exploring the Tower.

Find out more about the digital mission here.


13 | Walk along the perimeter of the Tower of London for views of London’s Skyline

Finally, don’t forget to walk along the perimeter of the Tower for some amazing views of London’s skyline, even if the sign says, “No Entry”.

No Entry sign to the perimeter of the Tower of London
“No Entry” | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel
London's skyline
London’s skyline | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel
London's skyline and the Walkie Talkie in the distance
London’s skyline – the Walkie-talkie in the distance | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel
View of Tower Bridge from Tower of London
A walk along the perimeter of the Tower of London gives some breathtaking views not seen elsewhere. Try and make time for it. | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

Thoughts so far…

The Tower of London has attracted much attention due to a mixture of its legends/myths of ghosts and the fearsome reputation it holds for inflicting torture on its prisoners. The prisoners who enter the walls of the Tower never really return to the outside world. However, according to history, torture was used only for relatively a short period of time during the Tudor era in the midst of political turmoil.

Although the Tower of London is no longer used as a prison, it is still a place that attracts much attention from tourists or local visitors because of its dark history and legends. It is now a secure “storage” unit for documents, armaments and jewels. However, this is only part of the story that makes Tower of London a #1 destination to visit. The more entertaining part lies in the 700 year old traditions of the castle itself which are fascinating and incredible. As mentioned earlier in the article, I will share these traditions in a future article.

As a tourist/visitor to the Tower of London, you simply have to witness it at least once.


There is so much more to see and experience at the Tower of London where you would want to feel the money’s worth. For many visitors, the Tower of London is a must see attraction and you may not wish to spend a lot of time waiting in line to purchase tickets. To maximise your time as a visitor to the Tower of London, you could purchase your ticket/s online and avoid this wait. Prior to my Annual Membership with the Historic Royal Palaces, I often purchased these day tickets or combined tickets that allows a visit to several attractions over a few days. I do still look for combined tickets to attractions not covered by the membership. I find these combined tickets to be extremely good value for money and offers flexibility that I need over several days. Take a look at one such example for London, here.


The queue at the ticket office to the Tower of London.
The queue at the ticket office to the Tower of London. You don’t have to do this! Get your tickets online | © mytimelessfootsteps | Image by Georgina_Daniel

My final say…

No journey to England is ever complete, in my opinion, without a visit to at least one ancient castle. I highly recommend the Tower of London. As you can see, the Tower of London has been many things in its life – a rich, complex and diverse institution popularly known as a “fortress, a palace and a prison.” It’s role as a prison, the centre for torture and execution as do the ghost stories had and continues to intrigue and attract visitors from all over the globe. Some of the Tower’s traditions such as the Ceremony of the Keys, the need to maintain six ravens and the Yeoman Warders are still very much present today – more on this in Part 2.

I hope you have enjoyed reading this post on the historical significance of the Tower of London and agree that it is The Best Guide to What you Need to Know on this ancient castle. If you do, please leave a comment below, I would love to know what your views are. If it was not helpful, you can say that, too. Either way, I would love to hear from you.

Useful information for when you visit the Tower of London

Getting here:

Tower of London, London, EC3N 4AB

Nearest Station:

Tower Hill Underground Station

Opening hours:

Tuesday-Saturday: 09:00-17:30
Sunday-Monday: 10:00-17:30

Yeoman Warders Tours: FREE | 45 Minutes

Tickets & Prices:

Buying online is cheaper and convenient. Entry to Tower of London includes entry to the Crown Jewels Exhibition, the White Tower and the Beauchamp Tower.

£25.00


Due to lockdown measures in the City of London as a result of Covid-19, some attractions may be closed or operate on restricted hours. In most situations you may need to pre-book a time slot for your visit. Check the following website for visits to the Tower of London: https://hrp.org.uk/tower-of-london/

Updated February 2021

If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International

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If you have enjoyed reading this, you may also be interested in reading further articles on the Tower of London:

Bloody Tower at the Tower of London | Books on the famous prisoners of Bloody Tower

Have a splendid time discovering London 🙂

Georgina xx


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The Bloody Tower at Tower of London

The Bloody Tower at Tower of London

Historical background to the Bloody Tower at Tower of London in a nutshell

The Bloody Tower, Tower of London
The Bloody Tower, Tower of London

Built in the 1220s under the reign of King Henry III, the Bloody Tower is located on the south side of the fortress, facing the Thames River, adjacent to the Wakefield Tower. which was formerly home to the royal apartments.

Spiked portcullis at the Bloody Tower, Tower of London |  © mytimelessfootsteps, georgina_daniel

When it was built, the tower was intended to control the main river entrance to the Tower of London. However, in 1280, under Edward I, the outer defensive wall was built which meant the entrance via the Bloody Tower was now land locked. Consequently, the tower’s entrance archway became the main access point between the inner and the outer ward with a narrow cobbled passage on the ground floor. The entrance archway is blocked by spiked portcullis, controlled with a lifting mechanism that still remains in operation today. The Bloody Tower, like many of the medieval era has both an upper and lower chamber.

The Tower underwent further expansions between 1360 – 1362 under the reign of Edward III but the most significant changes came in the 17th century when the prison Tower became home to Sir Walter Raleigh, his family and his servants.

Origin of the name ‘Bloody Tower’

The Bloody Tower was originally known as the Garden Tower, which was related to the Constable’s Garden. No one really knows how, why or what inspired the name ‘Bloody Tower’ but all research seems to suggest a strong association with the mysterious disappearance and supposed murder of two young princes in 1483. The Tower derived its name from the 1560s when it was believed that the princes were murdered. More on this below.

Prisoners of the Bloody Tower at Tower of London

There were a number of prisoners at the Bloody Tower. Archbishop Tudor Cranmer, Bishops Ridley and Latimer, Protestant martyrs condemned to death in 1556 by Queen Mary I who was Catholic. Thomas Overbury, poet and courtier was poisoned in Bloody Tower in 1613. Judge Jeffreys died at the Tower in 1688. Amongst all of the prisoners, the most notable high status ones were Sir Walter Raleigh and the two young princes.

Sir Walter Raleigh

One of the most famous prisoner of the Bloody Tower was Sir Walter Raleigh. He was an Englishman, an officer, an explorer and a poet who fell from grace and was imprisoned by James I.

Raleigh had an inquisitive mind, a passion for poetry and science.

Raleigh was a prisoner of high status. He spent thirteen years here. The Tower was extensively renovated to accommodate his wife, his two sons and he was allowed three servants. He was given access to a courtyard outside the Bloody Tower. This was an opportunity for Raleigh to do his daily exercise and to cultivate a small garden in which he could grow some exotic plants that caught his interests while travelling in South America.

Raleigh's Garden at the Bloody Tower
Garden at the Bloody Tower, Tower of London | Photo credit: https:hrp.org.uk

In his garden, he grew plants to create medicinal potions. Today, a visit to the garden at the Bloody Tower and you shall see plants such as mint, bistort and rosemary which Raleigh had used in his remedies.

A visit to the Tower of London today and take a look inside the Bloody Tower, Sir Walter Raleigh’s Study | Photo credit hrp.org.uk

Now, after 400 years since his execution, a visit to the Bloody Tower reveals a complex and a brilliant man, who famously introduced “potato” to English tables, and less famously, tobacco. It all appears that he was just an adventurous man whose spirit was crushed by imprisonment.

Sir Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh was denied his liberty but not his comfort. He was assigned two rooms on the second floor of the Bloody Tower. His family could visit and he could grow plants. He was in captivity for thirteen years. During his imprisonment he wrote a book, “History of the World” which was published in 1614. Sir Walter Raleigh was beheaded four years later in 1618 at the Old Palace Yard, Palace of Westminster.

Walter Raleigh, © akg-images / De Agostini Picture Library

hrp.org.uk

Read more on Sir Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh’s book, History of the World is available for purchase on Amazon as reprint or as cloud versions. Options below.

An Abridgment Of Sir Walter Raleigh’s History Of The World: In Five Books (1698) Paperback. 470 pages. Published 2010

by Walter Raleigh (Author)

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world’s literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Kessinger Publishing

The History of the World Kindle Edition

418 pages. March 29 2016

by Sir Walter Raleigh  (Author), C.A. Patrides (Editor) 

Download the Kindle version or buy it in Hardcover or Paperback.

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections
such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact,
or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections,
have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works
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Princes at the Tower | Edward V and Richard Duke of York | Murder and Mystery at the Bloody Tower

Despite the many prisoners who had seen their last days in the Bloody Tower, by far the saddest and most gruesome of events that made the Bloody Tower infamous was the mysterious disappearance of the two young princes.

The two Princes, Edward V and his younger brother, Richard Duke of York – sons to King Edward IV were under the guardianship of their uncle, Richard Duke of Gloucester who was their Lord Protector. They were brought to the Tower of London and was confined to the walls of the Bloody Tower. According to the Yeoman Warder tour I joined, the Princes may have watched from the top floor windows of the Bloody Tower the Coronation procession of their uncle, Richard Duke of Gloucester, proclaimed as King Richard III when it should have been Edward V, the older prince. The two Princes were last seen alive in June 1483. Mystery surrounds their disappearance.

The two Princes - Edward and Richard

The two Princes, Edward V and his younger brother, Richard Duke of York – sons to King Edward IV . The two Princes were last seen alive in June 1483. Mystery surrounds their disappearance.

Photo credit hrp.org.uk

It is said that their disappearance is so because they were murdered in the late summer of 1483. There are conflicting theories as to who ordered their murders.

According to the traditionalists theory, it is believed that the Princes were killed on their uncle Richard’s orders. On the other hand, the revisionists argue that his successor, Henry VII had equal cause to remove the two Princes, as they stood as much in his path to the throne as they did in Richard’s. (Richard III was defeated at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 by the Lancastrian Henry Tudor, who ascended to the throne as King Henry VII.

About two-hundred years or so later since the disappearance of the Princes from the Bloody Tower, skeletons were discovered behind the stairs leading to the White Tower in 1674. These were later removed to the Henry VII Chapel at Westminster Abbey at the command of Charles II.

My Timeless Footsteps says: There are inundated stories of the Tower being haunted by the many poor souls who lost their lives here. One such story/legend is that the Bloody Tower is haunted by the ghosts of the two princes. It was reported back in the 15th century where the Tower Guards spotted shadows of two small figures gliding down the stairs in white night shirts. The figures were said to stand silently, hand in hand, before fading back into the stones of the Bloody Tower.

The skeletons were re-examined in 1933. It proved to be those of two boys aged about 12 and 10, the same ages as the Princes when they disappeared. The disappearance of the Princes still remains a cold case as to who was responsible for their death.

If you wish to learn more and delve deeper into the mystery of the missing princes in sinister circumstances, the following books either in print or cloud is highly recommended.

The Princes In The Tower by Alison Weir (2008-06-05) Paperback – 1 Jan. 1823

Avaialble on Kindle, Hardback and Paperback

The stories of the Bloody Tower, as are all other stories of prisoners in other accommodations within the Tower of London grounds such as the Queen’s House and the Beauchamp Tower are spellbindingly intriguing. Even though there are so many books, articles, blogs dedicated to the iconic fortress, palace and prison, it still holds many secrets, unsolved mysteries and ghosts that linger the grounds of the Tower of London. It is hard to keep away from the Bloody Tower, and the wider Tower of London, especially if you are a history buff. For visitors generally, the Tower of London reflects the journey of 1000 years of British history and it is a destination not to be missed.


If you have enjoyed reading this article, you may also be interested in other London related articles:

Discover London | London MyCityMyTown | Christmas in London | All posts on the blog


I sincerely hope that this post is valuable to you in planning your visits to the Bloody Tower at Tower of London. If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. Subscribe to join us at My Timeless Footsteps to receive all the latest news and events. As always, I am contactable at ggdaniel166@gmail.com for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.

Have a splendid time exploring London

Georgina xx

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A beginner's guide to the secrets and unsolved mysteries at the Bloody Tower of Tower of London | Tower of London | Princes at the Tower | English History | British history | English monarchs | Sir Walter Raleigh | Walter Ralegh | Visit London | London | Landmarks in London | UNESCO listed in England via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/A beginner's guide to the secrets and unsolved mysteries at the Bloody Tower of Tower of London | Tower of London | Princes at the Tower | English History | British history | English monarchs | Sir Walter Raleigh | Walter Ralegh | Visit London | London | Landmarks in London | UNESCO listed in England via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

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A Must Read on British History-carefully selected books on the famous prisoners at the Bloody Tower to complement Tower of London series. Visit London | Princes in the Tower | Walter Raleigh | British History | Landmark of Britain | A Palace Fortress and a Prison | Stories on Tower of London | Visit Britain | Most popular attraction in London | Must visit sites in Britain | UNESCO | via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/A Must Read on British History-carefully selected books on the famous prisoners at the Bloody Tower to complement Tower of London series. Visit London | Princes in the Tower | Walter Raleigh | British History | Landmark of Britain | A Palace Fortress and a Prison | Stories on Tower of London | Visit Britain | Most popular attraction in London | Must visit sites in Britain | UNESCO | via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

London Eye 18 important facts you would love to know about this symbol of London

London Eye | 18 important facts you would love to know about this symbol of London

On any given day prior to Covid-19 lockdown measures came into force in London, the London Eye would elegantly rotate over the River Thames along the beautiful Southbank. A long queue awaits anyone (if you don’t have a skip-the-line ticket) who wishes to experience the breathtaking 360-degree views across the City. These days, the iconic landmark stands still, awaiting patiently to when lockdown measures ease to resume being one of London’s most popular paying attractions. Not long now as measures are eased and London is getting busy again. While a trip to London Eye is a “must-do” for most visitors to London, many would not know all of the facts about the structure which has become a symbol of London. So, for added value to your trip to London, here is a list of 18 important facts which tells you all about the London Eye.

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

1 | How did London Eye come about

London Eye was an idea put forward by husband and wife, David Marks and Julia Barfield. The couple responded to a competition in 1993 which asked Londoners to design a new landmark for the City celebrating the millennium. The idea of a wheel caught on and the official opening of London Eye was on 31 December 1999 in time for the millennium. However, due to a capsule clutch problem, the iconic observation wheel did not open till March 2000. A little late but that’s quite alright!

2 | Should not still be here

As the above, the structure was built especially for the Millennium. Therefore it was meant to be a temporary attraction. It was planned to stand on the River Thames for no longer than 5 years. However, due to its financial success, Lambeth Council granted a permanent licence for its operation.

There was yet another challenge for its continued presence. The Southbank Centre served an eviction notice to the London Eye in 2005. The dispute centred around a strut hovering over a bit of concrete owned by The Southbank! After a lengthy legal battle, a 25-year lease was finally agreed between the parties in February 2006, ensuring the landmark’s survival. The Eye just needs to pay The Southbank 500k a year. The monies supports the centre’s comprehensive annual arts programme, which is not a bad thing.

3 | What is London Eye? Is it a “ferries” wheel”

The London Eye is Not a Ferries wheel!

The London Eye is ​one of the world’s tallest cantilevered observation wheel. This is because the Eye is supported by a single A-frame. As well, the capsules are outside the wheel rim instead of hanging low, hence the difference with a ferries wheel.

4 | How heavy is the London Eye

The entire structure weighs 2,100 tonnes. The structure was assembled flat and moved onto eight temporary islands on the River Thames. It was raised into place in September 1999.

5 | How tall is London Eye

Although it stands at 135 metres (443 feet) high and has a diameter of 120 metres (394 feet), the Eye is not the tallest structure in London! The tallest building in London is the Shard at 310 metres (1,004 feet). The circumference of the London Eye is 424 metres (1,391 feet) which means if it weren’t a wheel, it would actually be taller than the Shard.

Even though it is not the tallest structure in London at present, it was the tallest structure and observation wheel when it was constructed. The London Eye is now the 4th tallest observation wheel in the world.

The top three tallest observation wheels are: High Roller at 168 metres (550 feet) in Las Vegas; The Singapore Flyer at 165 metres ( 541 feet) in Marina Bay; Star of Nanchang at 160 metres (525 feet) in Nanchang Star Amusement Park.

6 | Who owns the London Eye

This iconic landmark of London has seen a few ownership pass-by. Originally owned by British Airways, Marks Barfield and the Tussauds Group, led to the Tussauds Group becoming the sole owners in 2006. The Tussauds Group was sold to Blackstone in 2007 which became Merlin Entertainments Groups. So, London Eye is now owned by Merlin Entertainments Group (Merlin).

Merlin signed a sponsorship agreement with lastminute dot com who took over from Coca-Cola as headline sponsors of London Eye. It is a three-year deal which took effect as of February 2020. This gives lastminute dot com full naming rights and will see the landmark lit up in the travel brand’s corporate pink colour.

7 | How long does it take to ride the London Eye

A full rotation of the London Eye takes 30 minutes to complete. It travels at a leisurely speed of 0.6 miles per hour. This leisurely ride gives visitors the opportunity to enjoy breathtaking views over London. The slow rotation also allows for visitors to board and disembark at ease without the wheel coming to a halt.

8 | How many capsules on the London Eye

London Eye with its 32 capsules standing on its A-frame

The Eye has 32 capsules. Each represents the 32 boroughs in London. but they’re numbered from 1 to 33.

9 | Superstitious

Whether you believe in superstition or not and as with many buildings and structures, there is no number thirteen. The capsules skip from 12 to 14.

10 | Capsule #2 is Coronation Capsule

London Eye Coronation Capsule

The second passenger capsule on the London Eye is known as the Coronation Capsule. This is in honour of the 60th anniversary of the coronation of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II. Yeap, you got it – its Red! The only capsule in colour.

11 | Is London Eye a popular attraction

Very popular! Without a doubt, the London Eye is the most popular paid attraction in London welcoming almost 4 million visitors a year. The most popular Free attraction in London is the British Museum which sees more than 6 million visitors each year.

Amongst it’s visitors are celebrities who have taken more than one ride! Jessica Alba has gone on the Eye 31 times and Kate Moss, 25 times. Johnny Depp had to disguise himself so he could take his kids.

Johnny Depp:I got to take my kids to the London eye with no one looking at me like I was Johnny Depp. They did look at me like I was some kind of sicko walking around with beautiful kids, but I had a perfect disguise

On average the Eye supersedes the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramids of Giza in annual visitor numbers.

12 | Can you hire the Eye for private events

Absolutely yes! The Eye has been a popular venue for engagements, weddings, pop-up dining spots and a rotating nightclub!

According to records held by the organisers, there had been more than 500 weddings and more than 5,000 people have held their engagement on the Eye since it opened. The first wedding is recorded to have been held in 2001.

13 | Upgrade for a “sparkling” experience!

To really make your London Eye experience sparkle, enjoy a glass of Pommery Brut Royal champagne while you relax and enjoy the sublime views of London.

14 | How many people can the Eye accommodate

Each capsule can take about 25 people. This means that the London Eye can carry 800 people each rotation.

15 | What to experience on a day ride

There are many places to see on the River Thames or as you stroll the Southbank but none can compare to the views from the top – onboard the London Eye.

Unobstructed views of the Houses of Parliament

You will see most of London landmarks. Unobstructed views of Houses of Parliament, Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, Buckingham Palace, Tower Bridge, Tower of London, St Paul’s Cathedral, the Royal Parks and so many more, as far as your eyes can see! At its pinnacle of 135 metres, this largest cantilevered observation wheel gives you mesmerising 360-degree views of the City, laid out before you with views reaching as far as Windsor Castle, 25 kilometres away, on a clear day. Being so high up means that you can watch the River Thames stretch all the way to the horizon and the edge of the city limits.

16 | Not the first big wheel in London

The London Eye had a predecessor. Simply known as The Great Wheel which was in working order from 1895 – 1906. It was a 40 car ferris wheel modelled on the original design from Chicago. It was 94 metres (308 feet) in height and 82.3 metres (270 feet) in diameter.

17 | A popular feature in movies

The London Eye had been featured in many movies. In 2002, it was in 28 Days Later, 2004’s Thunderbirds and in Harry Potter, 2007 – Order of the Phoenix and in 2011, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows, Part 2.

If you are planning on a Harry Potter Warner Brothers Studio Tour when visiting London, note that this tour is a sold out event. You Must prebook well in advance to secure a visit. Take a look at availability below:

18 | View the exact replica of the wheel

A short journey from London, about 48 kilometres (30 miles) away an exact replica of the wheel can be found, in miniature form.

Photo credit to Get Your Guide

Legoland Windsor has a scale model of the Eye as part of its Miniland exhibit, which also features models of the Palace of Westminster, the Millennium Bridge, and Buckingham Palace.

Practical information for when visiting the London Eye

Location and opening times as follows:

The London Eye
Riverside Building
County Hall
Westminster Bridge Road
London
SE1 7PB

Opening times varies due to Covid-19 lockdown measures, This space will be updated as soon as the attraction reopens.

Nearest Underground stations

The London Eye is located within easy walking distance from several London Underground stations: Waterloo, Embankment, Charing Cross and Westminster.

Waterloo is the closest tube station and is located about five minutes walking distance. Exit the station following signs for the South Bank.

Embankment and Charing Cross stations are close together on the north side of the River Thames. Both tube stations are a ten-fifteen minute walk to reach the destination.

Westminster tube station is the closest station to Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament. From Westminster tube station, take exit one and follow signs for Westminster pie

Purchase your tickets before your visit!

With almost 4 million visitors a year, the London Eye is a very popular attraction. It is strongly recommended that you purchase your tickets online prior to your visit. Pay a little more and buy the skip-the-line ticket so you don’t have to wait in line. Sometimes queues can be for an hour or more. You do not want to spend long periods of time waiting when you can be maximising your time to sightseeing. In addition, if you are travelling with kids, you may not want to put them through the wait as well.

Peruse the following ticket choices and buy them before you travel and enjoy the 24-hour cancellation rights afforded to travellers by our trusted partner.


My thoughts…

To be honest, in terms of London landmarks, London Eye sits alongside St Paul’s Cathedral, Tower of London and the British Museum. It is big, it is the number one paid attraction by visitors and the views are spectacularly beautiful. To top it off, you can hire a capsule all for yourself and your group of friends for special occasions or simply upgrade for a personal experience over a glass of champagne. Design your experience for your next visit and have a fabulous experience.

While visiting London, don’t miss out on the countryside – do a day trip to Stonehenge, and combine it with a visit to the Cotswolds or Bath. Here are some choices for you.


Is this post valuable to you in planning your visits to the London Eye? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you. Scroll all the way down for more ideas and inspiring travel stories. Subscribe to join us at My Timeless Footsteps to receive all the latest news and events. As always, I am contactable at ggdaniel166@gmail.com for any further info or to design your itinerary for you.


Have a great time exploring London 🙂

Georgina xx

If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International


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Don’t fancy a DIY vacation? Hakuna matata! Sometimes we may want the experts to do all the work for us so we can sit back and enjoy. These guys are great at organising package holidays/vacations – take a look…

Timeless incredible holidays with n the Beach
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10 Valuable benefits of a package holiday

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Add a little luxury and stay at the Millennium


Stay at the Radisson Hotels Worldwide – Hotels to suit every budget and lifestyle: Luxury Collection, Upper upscale, Millennial Lifestyle and mid-market


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You may also like to read other articles on London before your visit


Here are some articles on my travels around the globe which you may like to read


I look forward to connecting with each of you


Sitting at 135m along the beautiful Southbank and handsomely rotating over the River Thames is the delightful London Eye, a masterpiece, and a symbol of London. But there are some facts you did not know about this cantilevered observation wheel via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/Sitting at 135m along the beautiful Southbank and handsomely rotating over the River Thames is the delightful London Eye, a masterpiece, and a symbol of London. But there are some facts you did not know about this cantilevered observation wheel via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Why guided tours are sometimes necessary when we travel?

Why guided tours are sometimes necessary when we travel?

Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post. The views expressed in my blogs are my own and I will always be explicit if any of its content is subsidised or sponsored. This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links. This means that I receive a commission if you click on a link and make a purchase. This is at no cost to you. Thank you so much for your support. Access Disclosure Policy in its entirety here.

Why Tours are sometimes necessary when we travel?

When I travel, either with family or solo, I tend to plan my travels beforehand and spend some time researching on the type of organised tours that are available. Often these tours act as guides to explore the areas and beyond. More often than not when on a short getaway of about three or four days, I tend to join guided tours to explore a neighbouring country or another city. There are times I join a free city walking tour and at other times, I like the city guided tours organised by third party providers. For me, it makes sense to book one of these tours and I share my reasons with you:

1 | Tours prove to be good value for money.

Foremost, organised tours such as day trips often covers more than one destination and I get to experience these hassle-free. I don’t have to think of transportation costs from one place to another. [Read about our amazing day trip to Chamonix, France from Geneva ⇒ A Perfect Romantic 3-day Itinerary in Geneva

Value for money is not restricted to just day trips – Combined tickets are also excellent value for money. I buy these beforehand, online at least a couple of days prior so I know I am covered. Purchasing tickets online is often cheaper than buying it at the ticket office on the day.

2 | Not to be disappointed when I get there.

I was disappointed in Amsterdam – [Read about my experience in Amsterdam where I missed on visiting a major attraction because I did not plan and purchase a ticket for the visit prior to visiting Amsterdam ⇒ Amsterdam in a Nutshell – 18 Experiences in 48 Hours. AND in Milan even when I tried to get tickets a few days prior!

3 | Organised tours often comes with a tour guide

And along with it is a wealth of information which I do not have to dig up through google or history books .

Read more on why Planning a trip is important and what you need to consider before embarking on your journey.

5 Reasons Why Travel Planning is Important 

Pretravel Planning – 25 Top Tips for a Stress-free Vacation


Suggested Tours for Greenwich, London

With these benefits in mind, I have carefully selected some tours through a third party provider which I use when I travel. I use Get Your Guide Tour group because they offer one of the best tours with excellent value for money. I say this knowing that they do because I have personally used them to organise my own tours and none has disappoint. I hope you will find these useful too.

I have chosen the below tours on Greenwich, a quintessential English town, about twenty-minutes journey from Central London. Greenwich has so much to offer visitors, from age 2 to 99! A day spent in Greenwich is a day well-spent indeed! With my absolute love for this pretty town, I have selected a combination of value tickets to some sights, guided tours and day trips – all, with the ultimate goal that your experiences at Greenwich will be enriched.

Please note that these are suggestions to enhance your travel experience to and in London. Of course, feel free to choose more appropriate tours to suit your needs from the vast choices that GetYourGuide provide.

You can read our full Disclaimer Notice here.

Selection from Get Your Guide

Value for Money Tickets – Single and Combined:

 
 

Day trips from Greenwich / London

 

Is this post valuable to you in planning your visits to Greenwich and London? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, Also, if there is any other interests you have in Greenwich and London which you would like to explore, please let me know, and I shall find out relevant information for you. I look forward to hearing from you.

Have a splendid time exploring Greenwich and London.

Georgina

I share regular highlights of my adventures with my travel community on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest where I would love for you to join me.


St Dunstan in the East-8 reasons why you should visit this Serenity amongst Ruins

St Dunstan in the East-8 reasons why you should visit this Serenity amongst Ruins



My latest love of London is an old ruined medieval Gothic church in the heart of London’s financial district, just a stone’s throw away from Tower Hill Station. On a quiet side-street tucked away between Tower Hill and Monument is St Dunstan Hill where you will find one of London’s most beautiful garden, often referred as “London’s secret garden” – St Dunstan in the East.

View post on: Why is Monument important to London?

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners



St Dunstan in the East, London

There are many reasons to visit this charming little gem where there exists serenity and tranquillity. However, I have listed 8 reasons why St Dunstan in the East should be on your list when visiting London.

Why you should visit St Dunstan in the East, London

The Garden at St Dunstan in the East today is an unusual garden. By “unusual” I mean quirky and charming. The ruins of this church is one of the last of the Blitz’s casualties remaining in the UK. More on its history, below. Let us have a look at the reasons why you should visit this garden.



1 | A quirky and charming garden to escape to

The first view of St Dunstan is that it is overgrown with trees, has wall shrubs, ivy and flowers growing amongst its ruins. However, the subtle beauty of this chapel came through as I walked around the ruins.

St Dunstan in the east

 Its defining characteristics of Gothic architecture was very present. The pointed arches before me were beautiful and the old stone with its cracks showed its age, still retaining its somewhat uniqueness. The large glass-less window frames had stood strong the test of time. One can only imagine how beautiful these stone tracery would have been before it’s destruction when these were ornamented with stained glass illustrating stories from the Bible and the lives of the Saints.

St Dunstan in the East - Serenity amongst ruins
St Dunstan in the East – Serenity amongst ruins
Fresh green foliage from the trees growing through the windows.
St Dunstan in the East: Fresh green foliage from the trees growing through the windows.

When I visited last summer, the summer setting was charming with fresh green foliage from the trees growing through windows. It was rather enchanting to have vines winding around the walls and wildflowers, popping here and there on the walls while palm trees added a tropical feel to St Dunstan in the East.

A gorgeously green spot in the summer sunshine. Along with this is also a fountain in the middle of what used to be the nave.



2 | Serenity amongst ruins

The fountain in the middle is surrounded by benches. There are many benches dotted around  the ruins to offer a place to sit and where you can enjoy the tranquillity of this garden. One could bring a book to read or a sketch book to capture the settings at St Dunstan in the East, or even have your lunch.

The centrepiece of St Dunstan in the East
Grab yourself a seat on one of these benches and read a book, sketch the surroundings, listen to music – pretty much do whatever you want in the serenity of St Dunstan in the East

The tranquillity here is ever so present as it almost seems like a strange peace had descended over the garden. I am sure this tranquillity continues to exist even when there are grey skies which so often dominate London, giving it a moody atmosphere.



3 | The rich history of St Dunstan in the East

According to records held by London’s Gardens & Parks Trust, there had been a church that stood here since ancient times. St Dunstan’s was built around circa 1100 and survived the Great Fire in 1666, sustaining severe damage. The damage was repaired and a tower plus a steeple was designed by Sir Christopher Wren which were added between 1695-1701. The church was rebuilt between 1817 and 1821. However, during London Blitz in 1941, when London was raining bombs, the small church took a direct hit that destroyed the structure, leaving only the north and south walls, the tower and steeple. In 1953, the spire was reconstructed and later, the tower in 1970.

St Dunstan in the East - Wren's tower and steeple survived the Blitz
St Dunstan’s in the East – Wren’s tower and steeple survived the Blitz


4 | An officially designated historical site

The site remained in ruins until 1967 when the City of London acquired it and turned it into a garden for public use in 1971. The ruins have been designated Grade 1 Listed building. This means that it is protected from further development and destruction.

5 | How St Dunstan in the East inherited its name

The church, St Dunstan in the East took its name from a 10th century monk. Dunstan (908 – 988) was an English Bishop who later became the Archbishop of Canterbury. He is said to have a colourful past for he survived brushes with black magic, leprosy and the devil himself.

Read more about St Dunstan, here

6 | Designed by Sir Christopher Wren

Sir Christopher Wren is a highly acclaimed English architect in history who had designed about 50 churches in the City of London. The most prominent and regarded as his masterpiece is St Paul’s Cathedral which took 35 years to build. Other designs of Wren include Royal Hospital at Chelsea (1682-1689), Hampton Court Palace (1689-1696) for King William III and Queen Mary, and the Royal Naval Hospital at Greenwich (1696-1705).

Learn more about Wren’s masterpiece, St Paul’s Cathedral in: #1 in My City & My Town – Appreciating London Series: What makes St Paul’s Cathedral in London a Special Place to Visit?

Wren died in London on Feb. 25, 1723 and was buried in St. Paul’s. His tomb bears a simple inscription:

“Reader, if you seek his monument, look about you.”



7 | Popularity of St Dunstan in the East

I did a quick research on St Dunstan in the East and discovered that it could be hired as a venue for wedding reception and parties. It is also a popular spot for magazine photoshoot and not forgetting Instagram poses too.

8 | A testament

St Dunstan in the East is not only a popular spot for peace and tranquillity for Londoners to escape to but it also stands as a testament to the resilience of the City of London which survived the Blitz.



My conclusion on St Dunstan in the East

This hidden secluded garden is one of the most beautiful gardens in the City of London. As one of the last Blitz-damaged buildings left in the UK, it stands as a memorial to the horrors of the Blitz and a testament to the resilience of the City of London which survived it.

London inspires me to explore and write compelling thoughts of this beautiful city even if I had seen something tens-of-times. Somehow exploring London these days are a “discovery” anew of something old. May be because I am a Londoner, I am biased but as I travelled also to faraway places, I discover that there is no place quite like London. Not quite. Not anywhere.

How to find St Dunstan in the East

You can reach St Dunstan in the East at:

​St Dunstan’s Hill, London EC3R 5DD

or Via phone:

​020 7374 4127

or Email:

parks.gardens@cityoflondon.gov.uk

Accessibility:

Ramped access via the Idol Lane entrance to the north side of the garden only.

Remainder of the garden accessed via steps.

Opening hours:

​​Open all year round from 8am to 7pm or dusk, whichever is earlier.

Closed Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day.

Entrances via Idol Lane and St Dunstan’s Hill.

Walking route from Tower Hill Station to St Dunstan in the East.



Is this post valuable to you in planning your visits to St Dunstan in the East? If so please let me know in comments below or via Contact Form, I would love to hear from you.

Happy discovering London!

January 2021, Update

Kudos my timeless footsteps


If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International





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Royal Palaces and Royal Parks-MyCityMyTown London Series

Royal Palaces and Royal Parks-MyCityMyTown London Series

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

MyCityMyTown-Appreciating London Series

The 3rd instalment is Here! To my fellow Adventurers who have been with me since January 2019, you are no stranger to this Series and thank you for your patience. For the Adventurers who are here for the first time, Hello and Welcome to my page. My 3rd instalment on MyCityMyTown-Appreciating London Series is on Royal Palaces and Royal Parks.

Appreciating London Series is a series of blogs designed to offer suggestions and travel tips with the aim to inspire mature travellers to visit London. This Series of blogs will be on my personal experiences and memories of each of the places I had visited with my kids and now, revisiting.

Collection of yesteryears

Taking a close look at my journey in life at the end of 2018 was an opportunity to take a trip down memory lane, to re-trace my footsteps and to reflect upon the best of “yesterday,” in this beautiful City which is My Town. I am thankful for much. You can read the full article by clicking MyCityMyTown London Series here. You can also find out What made the #1 and #2 on the Series and Why by clicking #1 and #2 .

As for my 3rd instalment on the Series, I decided to retrace my footsteps on the Royal Palaces and the Royal Parks. The Royal Palaces and the Royal Parks hold special places for me as I used to frequent these with my kids and there are many beautiful treasured memories. These days, as I walk through Kensington Gardens and the Statute of Peter Pan, I remember the fun, the laughter and their theatrics…and realise how time has flown by 😊

Appreciating London

Besides the memories with my kids, another reason for Appreciating London is because I love summer in London – the Not too hot summer when the temperature is around 24 or 25 degrees max. As a Londoner, I am very fortunate to have so much to see, witness, experience and lots of green spaces to getaway to if and when I wished. Almost everything happens here, right here in London! Moreover, London has, for the most times, pretty cool weather, except for a few weeks or so when the temperature soars and the heatwave sets-in. I don’t like it when it is too hot but I know many of you can’t have enough of it 🙂 

Plan ahead

As the summer weather sets in , Retracing my Footsteps in London has led me to discover many new things that I had not previously. I am seeing My City both as a Londoner and as a tourist. This has gently reminded me of many experiences throughout the years and the many visits where my kids and I would just hop onto the train for a half-hour ride to the heart of the City. These were mostly unplanned or involved overnight planning of a visit to a Royal Palace or a Castle, a picnic in the park, and games or read a book until sundown etc. 

Looking back, these were unplanned visits. Although there is fun in doing things impromptu, I believe there must be a general plan of what one intends to do, and you can save money as a result. Therefore, this time I have incorporated planning into my visits, because Planning is Important. I have written a blog on the 5 Reasons Why  Travel Planning Is Important which you may want to read and share your thoughts with me in comments below. What planning has helped me do this time was to think about researching for deals that would suit my plans – more on this below.

I hope you will enjoy reading about the Royal Palaces and the Royal Parks as much as I enjoy writing about them.

The Royal Palaces – Royal Palaces and Royal Parks in London Series

On the Royal Palaces, the following are the ones which are included in this Series. I will write on each of the palaces as I visit them.

If you are planning a visit to London or you are a Londoner looking for something to do, and wish to visit any of the Royal Palaces, here are my pick of the top 8 palaces and castles to visit in London or within a short trip of London, in no particular order:

1. Buckingham Palace | Royal Palaces and Royal Parks

Buckingham Palace is the most favourite among visitors to London. Buckingham Palace Tours start 20th July 2019 and runs throughout August and close 29th September 2019.  You can skip the line and purchase your tickets here.

January 2020 Update: Buckingham Palace is now closed to the public and re-opens in summer of 2020

1.1 | Royal Mews

However, you can still visit the Royal Mews. The Royal Mews is one of the finest working stables in existence and is responsible for all road travel arrangements for The Queen and the Royal Family. You will also see the spectacular new Diamond Jubilee State Coach, some of the Queen’s horses and meet the famous Windsor Greys or Cleveland Bays. You can puchase your tickets to the Royal Mews here.

1.2 | Changing of the Guard Ceremony

You can still watch the Changing of the Guard Ceremony outside Buckingham Palace as this is a FREE event. This is a popular event, so ensure you are there early to secure a a good viewing point. The ceremony takes places from 10:45 a.m. and lasts for 45 minutes.

The Changing of the Guards Ceremony is where the Buckingham Palace Old Guard arrives and forms up in the forecourt of the Palace from 10:30 a.m. onwards and they are joined by the Old Guard from St James’ Palace at 10:45 a.m. The New Guard then arrives from the Wellington Barracks to take over the responsibilities from the Old Guard. This formal ceremony is accompanied by music. There will be no ceremonies in poor weather conditions or when there are other ceremonial events taking place. You can check the Changing of the Guard Ceremony schedule with the Household Division here

2. Windsor Castle | Royal Palaces and Royal Parks

A trip to the UK or London is never complete without a trip to Windsor, the home of the historic Windsor Castle.

Windsor is a historic market town in the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead in Berkshire, Southeast England. It has a lively atmosphere with great shopping and restaurants. It sits on River Thames, just west of London, and is under an hour’s journey from London 

I have visited Windsor Castle a number of times over the years and the highlights in my article of this iconic and historical castle will help you plan your itinerary. I have also included travel tips and practical information to aid your planning. Read more on How to make the Best of Windsor Castle in I day here.

England: Windsor Castle
The Main Entrance to Windsor Castle_view from the Cambridge Gate
The Inner Courtyard of the Upper Ward is home to private apartments in Windsor Castle.
The Inner Courtyard of the Upper Ward is home to private apartments in Windsor Castle.

3. Kensington Palace London

These days, Kensington Palace is the royal residence for the young royals, who are the direct descendants of Queen Victoria. The Palace is the official London residence for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. It was the former home of late Princess Diana. The Palace has a long history of being a residence for the British Royal Family since the 17th century when King William III and Queen Mary II took residence just before Christmas of 1689.

What drew me to the Palace this time was the Exhibition held in honour of 200th year of Queen Victoria’s birth, and learnt much about the Real Victoria. My visit to Kensington Palace coincided with my current 3rd instalment of MyCityMyTown Retracing my footsteps Series

Kensington Palace. One of the Royal Palaces visited in #3 MyCityMyTown Appreciating London Series - Royal Palaces and Royal Parks
Kensington Palace. One of the Royal Palaces visited in #3 MyCityMyTown Appreciating London Series – Royal Palaces and Royal Parks

Kensington Palace is one of the Royal Palaces I enjoyed visiting and the architecture in some of these rooms were mind-blowing. Read the full article on KENSINGTON PALACE: WHY YOU SHOULD VISIT THIS 18TH CENTURY HISTORICAL GEM

Other Palaces on the list are:

4. Tower of London

5. Kew Palace

6. Clarence House

7. Banqueting House

8. Hampton Court Palace

Best-deals: All the Royal Palaces and Castles offer individual or combined tickets. As you know, it is cheaper to buy combined tickets. Also, it is cheaper to skip the line and buy the tickets online. As for me, I discovered that the Historic Royal Palaces offer of an Annual Membership to be beneficial. You can read about Why the Historic Royal Palaces Annual Membership is good for me here

Alongside the Royal Palaces in the City of London, there are also several parks  and large green spaces where one can escape to from the norm of sightseeing and crowded streets. Below, you will find a list of Royal Parks which I hope you will enjoy.

The Royal Parks | Royal Palaces and Royal Parks London Series

There are 8 Royal Parks, together they offer 5000 acres of green spaces which provides a natural habitat for many wildlife. The Parks are open to everyone throughout the year, where you can have a gentle stroll, exercise, have a bike-ride, have a picnic or just grab a seat at a bench and watch the world go by…

The 8 Parks are:

1. The Regents Park and Primrose Hill, London

Regent’s Park and Primrose Hill is a large green space that offers a sanctuary for people who are constantly on the go with City’s hum-drum. Regent’s Park is different, from the other Parks in London because of its tranquil settings, beautiful landscape and the opportunity to catch either the sunset or the sunrise at Primrose Hill. There are flowers of all colours, roses especially, 12,000 of them, all named and planted in neat rows (more on this below). This is a place where you can spend hours admiring the sea of colours and enjoy the amazing fragrances.  A total paradise.

Regent's Park: This tree-lined path welcomes you to Avenue Gardens.
Regent’s Park: This tree-lined path welcomes you to Avenue Gardens.
Queen Mary's Garden, Regent's Park
Queen Mary’s Garden, Regent’s Park

For me, every visit to Regent’s Park had been a journey of new experiences and discovery, even more so on my recent visits which was part of MyCityMyTown – London Series.

You can read more on The Regents Park and Primrose Hill here.

2. Kensington Palace Gardens, London

Kensington Palace Gardens is made up of beautiful landscaped grounds. Trees here are planted in straight lines, there are some unique looking ones near the round pond and colourful flowering shrubs which makes a visit here more than inviting.

The Round Pond at Kensington Palace Gardens - one of the 8 Royal Parks in London. #3 in MyCityMyTown Appreciating London Series - Royal Palaces and Royal Parks.
The Round Pond at Kensington Palace Gardens. – one of the 8 Royal Parks in London. #3 in MyCityMyTown Appreciating London Series – Royal Palaces and Royal Parks.

The Sunken Garden is my favourite part of the Palace grounds. I am sure it is the case for many visitors to this idyllic location.

It was planted in 1908 and resembles classical gardens of the 18th century in the UK. A secluded oasis of peaceful haven with ornamental flower beds, an ornamental pond with fountains and a variety of vibrant, exotic and colourful plants like roses, geraniums, cannas and begonias.

Kensington Palace: The Sunken Garden
Kensington Palace: The Sunken Garden
Kensington Palace Gardens: The sunken garden, summer 2019
Kensington Palace Gardens: The sunken garden, summer 2019

For the full article on Kensington Palace Gardens, read KENSINGTON PALACE GARDENS – AN IDYLLIC GETAWAY FROM CHAOS OF THE CITY here.

3. Greenwich Park, London

Greenwich, London is a nice little town just a stone’s throw away from London, in the south-east which sits on the banks of River Thames, accessible with a 20-minute journey from London (Bank Station). It is a popular destination for tourists because of its maritime and astronomy history.

The area, Royal Greenwich Park is host to the Royal Museum Greenwich (RMG) which is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site and consists of four top attractions.

1. Royal Observatory,

2. Queen’s House

3. National Maritime Museum

4. Cutty Sark.

All of these attractions are within walking distance of each other and would typically fill a full-day itinerary.

This quaint little town is definitely a Must-Do for families with kids, grand-kids, solo travellers and couples – not only for the over 50’s but at any age! You will experience history, lots of free exhibits and guided tours. You will also save money  Read the full article on 45 Experiences and More in 1 Day at Greenwich.

Other Parks in London

4. Hyde Park

5. St James’ Park

6. Hyde Park

7. Richmond Park

8. Bushy Park

  Information on the rest of the the Royal Parks are available here.

I hope this page has given you a flavour of what My Timeless Footsteps is all about and what you can expect from me, Georgina. I invite you to join me, plan your next adventure and experience the wonder of exploring and discovering. Where would your next adventure take you?  Get in touch via the comments box below or Contact Form. I would love to hear from you.

Happy exploring, discovering London!

January 2021, Update

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Royal palaces and royal parks
Royal palaces and royal parks

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An introductory travel guide listing eight royal palaces and  eight royal parks in London which should top every visitor's list. via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/An introductory travel guide listing eight royal palaces and  eight royal parks in London which should top every visitor's list. via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Why is Monument London important to London?

Why is Monument London important to London?

In the heart of the financial district of London stands a 61 meters, (202 feet) Doric column, simply known as Monument.

Monument London

The Monument is an important landmark in London. It is a permanent reminder to the Great Fire of London in 1666 and the rebuilding of London from its ashes. The Monument was built between 1671 and 1677.

The Doric column, simply known as the Monument, was built between 1671 and 1677 as a reminder of the Great Fire of London 1666 and the rebuilding of the City of London.
The Doric column, simply known as the Monument, was built between 1671 and 1677 as a reminder of the Great Fire of London 1666 and the rebuilding of the City of London.

The Great Fire of London and Monument

The Great Fire of London was a significant event in London’s history because it destroyed the greater part of the City. The Great Fire brought the City to a standstill, severely damaging thousands of houses and buildings and hundreds of streets. Although the loss of lives was little, the impact of the fire was hugely felt by Londoners.

The only buildings to survive the Great Fire were the Leadenhall Market, the Royal Exchange, the Middle Temple Hall, the Staple Inn and the Guildhall. The source of the fire was a baker’s house in Pudding Lane and it started on Sunday 2nd September 1666 and was extinguished on Wednesday 5th September 1666.

Monument as a landmark

So, in keeping with ancient tradition to mark an event with a landmark, the Doric column was built. It was fascinating to discover that the precise location of the Monument was also a significant factor. It is located at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill. It is 61 metres (202 feet) high which is the exact distance between the baker’s shop in Pudding Lane and the Monument.

Design of the Monument

The column was designed by Dr Robert Hooke with collaboration from Sir Christopher Wren. It is a narrow-spiral stone stairs of 311 steps leading to a viewing platform near the top of the Monument.  The Monument is surmounted by a drum and a copper urn from which flames emerge to symbolise the Great Fire.

The Monument was initially used as a centre for experiments for the Royal Society but this was soon discontinued. Thereafter, the Monument became a point of historic interest as a unique structure.

The viewing platform near the top of the Monument and at the top, a drum and a copper urn from which flames emerge to symbolise the Great Fire of 1666
The viewing platform near the top of the Monument and at the top, a drum and a copper urn from which flames emerge to symbolise the Great Fire of 1666

Finally…

The Monument is one of the popular “must-see” places in London and it offers a 360 degree spectacular panoramic views across London from the public gallery which is about 160 feet high.

It is inexpensive and is a landmark in London to tick-off your list. I highly recommend it.


Read other posts on London

Travel tips and Useful information on Monument

  • Opening Hours

Summer Opening Hours: April – September 9:30am – 6:00pm daily (last admission 5:30pm)


Winter Opening Hours: October – March 9:30am – 5:30pm daily (last admission 5:00pm)


The Monument is closed from 24 – 26 December.

  • Admission Prices


Adults £4.50
Children (aged 5-15) £2.30
Students (with identification) £3.00
Seniors (aged 60+) £3.00

  • Joint tickets for Tower Bridge Exhibition and the Monument


Adults £11.00
Children (aged 5-15) £5.00
Students (with identification) £7.50

Seniors (aged 60+) £7.50
1 Adult & 2 Children £18.30
2 Adults & 1 Child £23.10
2 Adults & 2 Children £26.50
2 Adults & 3 / 4 Children £30.90
Under 5 FREE

https://www.themonument.org.uk

PLEASE NOTE: The Monument only accepts cash payment, and children under the age of 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

Travelling to Monument:

By tube:

Use Monument Station on the District and Circle lines; or

London Bridge on the Northern and Jubilee lines.

By train: 

Use London Bridge, Fenchurch Street or Tower Gateway DLR stations

By bus: 

Use numbers 17, 521, 21, 43, 133, 141, 48, 149 (all routes go through London Bridge).


Is this post valuable to you in planning your trip to London? If so, let me know in comments below or via Contact Form. I would love to hear from you.

Happy Discovering London!

Georgina xx

January 2021, Update

If you choose to #travel, travel safely | #staysafe #stayinspired | Read now to #travel later. For latest on Covid-19 go to: CDC.GOV | WHO International


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Discover why this Monument in the heart of London's financial district is important & explore, enjoy panaromic views of London's skyline | London's Landmark | Historic London | London Fire | London | Historic Britain | London's Financial District | via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/Discover why this Monument in the heart of London's financial district is important & explore, enjoy panaromic views of London's skyline | London's Landmark | Historic London | London Fire | London | Historic Britain | London's Financial District | via @GGeorgina_mytimelessfootsteps/

Why the Historic Royal Palaces (HRP) Annual Membership is good for me

Why the Historic Royal Palaces (HRP) Annual Membership is good for me

Visiting any of the Historic Royal Palaces in London will undoubtedly involve purchasing an entry ticket. All the Royal Palaces offer individual or combined tickets. As you know, it is cheaper to buy combined tickets. Moreover, it is cheaper to skip the line and buy the tickets online.

As for me, I discovered that the Historic Royal Palaces offer of an Annual Membership to be beneficial.

Disclaimer: This Post and all related posts may contain affiliate links including Amazon LLC. This means that I earn a commission, from qualifying purchases at no cost to you, if you click on a link and make a purchase. Access full disclaimer here or get in touch with me via Contact form if you have any questions about any of the companies. You could also take a look at our Trusted Partners

How I have used the Historic Royal Palaces membership

I love history and anything of historical significance, so purchasing this annual membership allows me to take a walk in history as many times as I like!

I subscribed to the membership prior to my visit to Kensington Palace in May 2019 for the Exhibition on Queen Victoria which you can read here. I have since visited this iconic castle a couple of times.

I have visited the Tower of London (included in the membership a couple of time also) .

Historic Royal Palaces Annual Membership

I list the benefits of this annual membership below. I think it is one of the best value for money annual membership there is. If you disagree with me, let me know in the comments below, I would love to hear from you.