3 best group tours to the Isle of Wight

Group tours to the Isle of Wight from Central London

Recommended Group Tours to the Isle of Wight from London

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A short ferry ride from the ports in Southeast England is one of Britain’s best islands – the Isle of Wight. The incredible and alluring Isle of Wight has been a fashionable holiday destination since Victorian times. Host to a multitude of activities for the very young, young, mid-life travellers and retirees, the island is a favourite for visitors to the UK. Renowned for its finest landscapes, the Isle of Wight Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is a treasured area home to unique woodlands, flora and fauna. One of the best ways to discover this diamond in the rough is by joining group tours to the Isle of Wight from central London.

There are numerous group tours to the Isle of Wight from London offered by various tour companies. Each tour is different offering unique experiences. Timeless Travel Steps recommends the following carefully selected group tours to the Isle of Wight to enhance your experiences on the island.

Before we share our selected group tours to the Isle of Wight, let’s take a look at the benefits of group tours.

Benefits of group tours to the Isle of Wight

TTS recommends group tours as a great way to explore the Isle of Wight for the following reasons:

1 | Value for money

Group tours are generally good value for money. For one encompassing price, the group tours to the Isle of Wight begins in London, takes you across the Solent and around the island. The driver waits for you at each destination and takes you to the next highlight. There is no need for public transportation and you probably do not have to walk very far to the car park either. This saves time. At the end of the tour, you return to London. All transportation costs are included in the tour price.

2 | Generally cover major highlights in the Isle of Wight

The tour covers major highlights of the island, with time to explore at each destination. A visit to Osborne House, the former palatial home of Queen Victoria is generally top of the list destination. Also, a visit to Alum Bay, home to the incredible Needles rocks and lighthouse along with other activities to indulge in. However, just note that not all tours will cover these attractions.

A day-long tour will have you visit a selected number of highlights to give you an overview of the island. A longer tour of a few days will inevitably be of more value to you. You will experience more of the island at a steady pace and stay overnight on the island.

Each tour is unique encompassing various destinations. When selecting the tour, ensure that the highlight you wish to experience is included.

3 | Relax and Enjoy

Relax and enjoy while on a pre-planned itinerary. You don’t have to think about hiring a car, driving rules and regulations, sorting out parking or hotel accommodations (if selected). A group tours gives you more time to enjoy and embrace the delightful scenic rugged coast of the Isle and countryside that England is famed for.


Recommended Group Tours to the Isle of Wight

Here is our selection of group tours for you:

The Isle of Wight day trip from London

The Needles Landmark Isle of Wight

A day tour from the city of London transports you to the windswept cliffs and tranquil woodlands of Isle of Wight. Visit the quintessential beach villages of Godshill and Shanklin. Spend some time on the sandy beaches at Sandown and finally visit Osborne House before returning to London.

This tour is approximately 12 hours and departs early at around 7:00 a.m.

Good to know about what is included:

Driver/Guide

Live commentary

Pick-up /Drop-off – central meeting point

Air-conditioned bus

Additional Info:

Book online

Instant digital Confirmation

Cancellation – All sales are final.

Suitable for most travellers.

From £109.00 (2021)

NB: This is a sell-out tour.

From £109.00 (2021) > book your day tour from London to the Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight weekend trip from London

Osborne House Isle of Wight bucket list

A weekend trip to Isle of Wight gives you so much more with plenty of time to explore independently as well. Experience the rugged shores and cliffs, of this beautiful island. Visit Shanklin and Ventnor, popular seaside towns in the Isle. You will also visit the unmissable and most photographed, The Needles landmark in Alum Bay.

Good to know about what is included in this multi-day trip

Driver/Guide

Live commentary

Overnight stay as selected

Breakfasts

Entrance to Osborne House

Pick-up/Drop-off – central meeting point

Air-conditioned vehicle

Additional Info:

Limited to maximum of 20 participants

Not suitable for wheelchair users

Book online

Immediate digital confirmation

Cancellation – All sales are final and in cur 100% cancellation fee. If minimum numbers are not met, you will be refunded.

NB: This is popular tour. Book early to secure your place.

From: £225.00 (2021) > book your weekend trip to the Isle of Wight from London

The Isle of Wight and Southern Coast tour from London – 3 days

Isle of Wight coastal walk | group tours to Isle of Wight

Relax and enjoy this pre-planned trip to Isle of Wight and the southern coast of England. Visit the historical landmarks and the main attractions on the island. On your return from Isle of Wight, visit the Bombay Saphire gin house.

Good to know about what is included in this 3-day trip:

Driver/Guide

2 nights accommodation (select type)

Breakfasts

Small group of 16

Minimum age is 5 years

Not suitable for wheelchair users

Air-conditioned vehicle

Commentary

Pick-up/Drop-off – central meeting point

Additional Info:

Book online

Instant digital confirmation

Cancellation – Cancellation rights varies depending on the tour provider is. Check prior to booking

Book with your preferred tour operator:

The Isle of Wight at a Glance

Coordinates: Latitude: 50° 40′ 30.59″ N Longitude: -1° 16′ 30.60″ W

Isle of Wight
The Isle of Wight flag
Isle of Wight
The Isle of Wight Coat of Arms

Basic facts:

Island: Largest island in England

Island’s city: Newport

Population: 141,538 | Second most populous island in England behind Portsea Island.

Landmass: The Isle is roughly 380.728 kilometer/147 square miles

County: Governed by one unitary authority.

Time Zone: Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) | British Summer Time (BST)

High season: July – August

Religion: Christianity

Language: English

Money

Currency: Pounds Sterling (£)

Credit and Debit cards accepted.

Topography

Elevation: Maximum elevation: 242 m | Average elevation: 15 m | Minimum elevation: -1 m

Designation:

1 | Isle of Wight Biosphere Reserve, United Kingdom

2 | Isle of Wight – Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

Why Visit:

Famous for: Ghosts, Dinosaur bones, Victorian villages, Cycling routes, Walking & Hiking + Healing & Wellbeing retreats

Number of Visitors surpass residents >

Travel Advice

Isle of Wight Travel Advice

Travelling to the UK Advice

UK Foreign Travel Advice


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Lady Jane Grey The Forgotten Queen

Lady Jane Grey The Forgotten Queen

Lady Jane Grey was an English noblewoman, who became queen of England for a very short time in history – 9 days to be precise. Though proclaimed a queen, she has hardly been referred to as one! Shrouded in conspiracies, political and religious conflicts, her path to greatness was short-lived. The story of Lady Jane Grey the forgotten queen is compelling. Her life, brief reign and tragic end remains one deserving of revisit. She was one of the three queens imprisoned at the Queen’s House in Tower of London.

This article is an introduction to the young, beautiful and intelligent Lady Jane Grey’s life and there are some resources embedded in this post, should you wish to delve deeper to learn more.

Lady Jane Grey

About Lady Jane Grey

Lady Jane Grey The forgotten queen
Lady Jane Grey by Unknown artist, c1590-1600, © National Portrait Gallery, London | Historic Royal Palaces

Lady Jane Grey was the first daughter to Henry Grey, 3rd Marquess of Dorset (later 1st Duke of Suffolk) and Lady Frances Brandon. She was the great grand-daughter of Henry VII, through her mother who was herself the older daughter to the younger of Henry VIII two sisters, Mary. Hence, her direct link to King Henry VIII. She was the first cousin, once removed of Edward VI.

She was also known as Lady Jane Dudley following her marriage to Lord Guildford Dudley, the younger son of Lord Dudley, Duke of Northumberland who was the chief minister to Edward VI.

Lady Jane Grey – Her early years

The general view is, Jane Grey was born in October 1537 at Bradgate Park, Leicestershire. Her family were high status and were frequent at the royal court. Jane was the eldest of three siblings. Her second sibling was Lady Katherine and her youngest was Lady Mary.

Lady Jane received excellent but strict education. She could speak and write in Greek and Latin from an early age. She learnt French, Italian and Hebrew and spoke these languages in a highly skilled manner. Through the influences of her father and her tutors, Lady Jane Grey became a committed and devout Protestant.

Jane did not like sports or hunting parties very much, an activity typical of the era for young girls of her status. Instead, she preferred book studies, in particular, the works of Plato. She had seemingly said to have responded to a question by her tutor, as to why she is not outdoors with the others with the following:

I wist all their sport in the park is but a shadow to that pleasure that I find in Plato. Alas, good folk, they never felt what true pleasure meant.

Lady Jane Grey | Historic Royal Palaces

Jane also regarded her upbringing as harsh. She is said to have complained to her tutor, Roger Ascham, an English Scholar and Writer, of what is expected of her.

“For when I am in the presence either of father or mother, whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand or go, eat, drink, be merry or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing, or doing anything else, I must do it as it were in such weight, measure and number, even so perfectly as God made the world; or else I am so sharply taunted, so cruelly threatened, yea presently sometimes with pinches, nips and bobs and other ways (which I will not name for the honour I bear them) … that I think myself in hell”

Lady Jane Grey | Ives, Eric 2009

Around February 1547, when Lady Jane Grey was barely ten years old, she was sent to live in the household of Queen Catherine Parr, the final queen consort to Henry VIII and Thomas Seymour, Uncle to Edward VI at Sudeley Castle, Gloucestershire. It was customary in the Tudor era for children to be brought up in other households of higher status where they learn the etiquette and be in a suitable position for a patron to make good marriage. Jane attended to Catherine until Catherine’s death in September 1548.

After Catherine’s death, Lady Jane Grey was made ward of Thomas Seymour, who soon afterwards curated a plan to marry Jane to his nephew, Edward VI who was also Jane’s cousin. His plan did not go much further as Thomas Seymour was beheaded for treason in 1549. Thereafter, Lady Jane Grey returned to her childhood home at Bradgate.

Lady Jane Grey at Bradgate

When Lady Jane Grey returned to Bradgate, she resumed her studies. A couple of years later, her father was created the Duke of Suffolk resulting in a beautiful and talented girl frequenting the royal court.

Lady Jane Grey and Guildford Dudley – “a wife who loves her husband”

Lady Jane Grey and Lord Guildford Dudley
Portraits of Lady Jane and Lord Guildford Dudley by Richard Burchett, © Parliamentary Art Collection, WOA 1008. | hrp.org.uk

Jane caught the attention of John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, the most powerful man in the land at that time, advisor to Edward VI. He did not want to lose his favoured position. He curated a master plan, with the agreement of Jane’s father for his son, Guildford Dudley to marry Jane. His intention was to make his son and Jane, the King and Queen of England upon the death of Edward VI, whose health was already failing. Jane was just sixteen and Guildford, eighteen.

The couple were married on May 25 1553 at Durham House in a triple ceremony – alongside her sister, Catherine Grey and her sister-in-law, Catherine Dudley.

Not much is known of Guildford and Jane’s relationship but Jane is noted as saying that she is “a wife who loves her husband”

Lady Jane Grey and Edward VI

Edward VI and Lady Jane Grey
Image: Edward VI attributed to William Scrots, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, RCIN 405751 | hrp.org.uk

Edward VI inherited the throne at the very young age of nine following the passing of his father, Henry VIII. With just five years on the throne since, he contracted fever and cough in January 1553 (later suspected to be tubercolosis). He fell terribly ill and at times appear to recover only to succumb to his illness again. He realised that his health was volatile and he may not survive much longer. He wanted so much for his heir to be a male Protestant but this was not possible. The next in line to the throne in accordance to Henry VIII’s Will were Edward’s half-sisters, Mary who was Catholic and Elizabeth, along with Lady Jane Grey whose Protestant faith was strong.

Edward set about writing his instrument for succession – “Device for Succession”

Edward VI – ‘Device for Succession’

To ensure his successor would be a male Protestant, Edward VI devised a Will, taking inspiration form his own father’s Will, Henry VIII. He disinherited his half-sisters, Mary and Elizabeth (later Elizabeth I) in favour of male heirs of his cousin, Lady Frances Grey or her children, Jane, Catherine and Mary.

When by June 1553, it became clear that Edward VI was terminally ill and none of his cousins had produced a male heir, he altered his instrument of succession in favour of Lady Jane Grey solely.

In this instrument of succession, Edward VI set out that although Lady Jane Grey would reign as queen, her successor would be a male heir. If Lady Jane were to die without male heirs to the throne, then the crown would pass to one of the sons of her sisters. This instrument was signed by the Privy Council, bishops, peers and at least ten of the country’s senior advocates of the time.

One can’t help but think that this is all part of a grand masterplan by John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland who was also the Lord Protector to Edward VI. Afterall, he did marry-off his son with young Lady Jane.

A little background to Third Succession Act 1544

The Third Succession Act 1544 restored Henry VIII’s daughters, Mary and Elizabeth to the line of succession.

During the reign of Henry VIII, both Mary and Elizabeth were declared illegitimate by statute after his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn were declared void. The Act also empowered Henry VIII to alter the succession by his Will. Henry VIII reaffirmed the succession of his three children but altered the succession to include the heirs of his younger sister, Mary should his children leave no descendants. No one knows why but he did not include Jane’s mother, Lady Frances Grey in the succession.

How did Lady Jane Grey become Queen of England

Lady Jane Grey - on her Coronation
Lady Jane Grey | Jane was wearing a green velvet dress embroidered in gold, with a long train carried by her mother.
Her headdress was white, heavily decorated with jewels, and on her neck a chinclout (a type of scarf) ‘of black velvet, striped with small chains of gold, garnished with small pearls, small rubies and small diamonds … furred with sables and having thereat a chain of gold enamelled green, garnished with certain pearls.’ | Lady Jane Grey (1536-54) after a painting by Herbert Norris, © Lebrecht Music & Arts/Alamy Stock Photo

King Edward VI died on July 6 1553. However, his death was not announced till four days later, on July 10. Lady Jane was told she was now queen on July 9.

On July 10 1553, Lady Jane was officially proclaimed to be Queen of England, France and Ireland. She took up secure residence in the Tower of London as was customary of English monarchs to reside from the time of accession until the time of coronation.

Lady Jane Grey – from accession to execution

Meanwhile, with the death of the King now public, Mary, daughter to Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon devised her own plan to garner support of the public. She was much popular amongst the people of England, especially Catholics and those who believed in her claim to the throne as Henry VIII’s daughter. On the other hand, Lady Jane Grey was unheard of. Seeing her popularity, the Privy Council switched allegiance and proclaimed Mary, the Queen on July 19th 1553.

On July 19th, Lady Jane Grey became a prisoners within the walls of the fortress, after taking residence in preparation for her coronation, and her husband, Guildford Dudley became prisoner at Beauchamp Tower in the Tower of London.

Lady Jane Grey and her husband, Guildford Dudley was tried for high treason in November 1553 and were found guilty. Guildford Dudley was executed on February 12 1554 at Tower Hill.

Later the same day, February 12, 1554, Jane was granted a private execution within the Tower of London grounds – at Tower Green. Dressed in black, Jane remained calm, making her way to the scaffold. These were her final words:

‘Good people, I am come hither to die, and by a law I am condemned to the same; the fact indeed against the Queen’s Highness was unlawful and the consenting thereunto by me…I do wash my hands thereof in innocency before the face of God and the face of you good Christian people this day.’

Anonymous (1997) [1850]. “1554, The Execution of Lady Jane Grey and Lord Guildford Dudley”. In Nichols, John Gough (ed.) The Chronicle of Queen Jane and of Two years of Queen Mary, the Camden Society; Marilee Hanson
Lady Jane Grey Prayer Book
Lady Jane Grey’s prayer book with her handwritten inscription to Sir John Bridges, Lieutenant of the Tower, © British Library Board, Harley 2342, ff.74v-75

Lady Jane then read Psalm 51, in her prayer book, gave her gloves and handkerchief to one of her ladies, her prayer book to the Lieutenant of the Tower, her gown, headdress and collar to her ladies. She asked her executioner to ‘dispatch of her’ quickly and she tied a blindfold around her eyes. She scrambled blindly for the block, panic overtook her, and she cried, ‘What shall I do? Where is it?’

Lady Jane Grey at the scaffold
The Execution of Lady Jane Grey (detail), by Paul Delaroche, © National Gallery London 2017

Someone helped her find her way, and she laid her head on the block and said her last words, ‘Lord, into thy hands I commend my spirit’. The axe fell.

Jane was just 17 years old. Queen for 9 days.

Jane and her husband, Guildford are buried in the Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula, on the northside of Tower Green in Tower of London.

Lady Jane Grey – her legacy

Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey, steel engraving by William Holl, 1868, © Florilegius /Alamy Stock Photo | hrp.org.uk

Following her death and the unsuccessful reign of Queen Mary I, Lady Jane became to be known as a Protestant Martyr, and as an innocent victim in the nineteenth century. Her story grew to legendary proportions in popular culture, producing romantic biographies, novels, plays, operas, paintings, and films.

In the Beauchamp Tower, to the right of the fireplace, there is a coat of arms, deeply cut into the wall, representing the Dudley family, possibly carved by Guildford or his brother, Robert when they were prisoners at the Tower. Across the fireplace, there is another graffiti that says ‘IANE’ which stands for ‘JANE’.

On a final note…

The story of Lady Jane Grey is both fascinating and a tragic one. A very young girl caught up in the political and religious conflict of her time but so little is known of her, that it is a challenging task to describe her completely. Nevertheless, her story is one worth revisiting – she was the Queen of England, France and Ireland for nine days, the shortest reigning monarch in English history.

Resources:

Ives, Eric (2009) Lady Jane Grey: A Tudor Mystery. Wiley-Blackwell.

Tallis, Nicola (2017) Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey. Oakhill Publishing

Cook, Faith (2004) Nine-Day Queen of England: Lady Jane Grey.

Evangelical Press

Other resources: Historic Royal Palaces

Lady Jane Grey at a Glance:

Alternative title: Lady Jane Dudley

Born: October 1537, Bradgate, Leicestershire

Parents: Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk | Lady Frances Brandon

Married: Lord Guildford Dudley

Reign: July 10 1553 – July 19 1553

Inherited from: Edward VI

Succeeded by: Mary I

Religion: Protestant

Childhood home: Bradgate

Died: February 12, 1554 (between 16-17 years old).

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Unmissable 9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle Isle of Wight

Unmissable 9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight has a distinct variety of rich landscapes, recognised as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty ensuring that one of England’s finest and most fascinating of landscapes is preserved and enhanced. While the secretive coastlines, white chalky cliffs, quiet estuaries and gentle rolling woodland had attracted visitors since Victorian times, and continues to do so all year round, this enchanting island is home to some wealth of times gone by and the most fascinating and truly magical history.


Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle
Side view of Carisbrooke Castle

Nestled in the village of Carisbrooke, Newport, sitting proudly atop a hill at the heart of Isle of Wight is Carisbrooke Castle, steeped in history and legend since pre-Roman times. Today, this remarkable castle is managed by English Heritage, and opened to the public. With lots of things to see and do whilst enjoying in the fresh open air, Carisbrooke Castle is a destination for history buffs, couples, family days out as well as for photography enthusiasts. To ensure nothing goes amiss, here is a guide for the unmissable 9 fun things to do in Carisbrooke Castle when visiting this heritage landmark.

Unmissable 9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle

Carisbrooke Castle Newport Isle of Wight Victorian love affair experience
Carisbrooke Castle

History tells us that Carisbrooke was once, the strongest castle on the Isle of Wight, and boasts defences from several eras. A central place of power and defence for over a thousand years, it was a Saxon fortress, a Norman castle, an artillery fortress during the Elizabethan era, later a prison for Charles I, then home to Princess Beatrice, Queen Victoria’s youngest daughter. This historic motte-and-bailey castle is quintessentially romantic and will delight its visitors.

1 | Visit the Carisbrooke Castle 16th century guardhouse

One of the best things to do at Carisbrooke Castle is to begin your visit with an overview of the castle’s history. Learn aboutthe tumultuous history of this fascinating and stunning castle first hand – watch the film and virtual tour presented in the 16th century guardhouse.

2 | Visit the Carisbrooke Castle Museum

carisbrooke castle museum | things to do at Carisbrooke Castle
Carisbrooke Castle Museum Lower Gallery | Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle | Image: courtesy of Carisbrooke Castle Museum

Visit the Carisbrooke Castle Museum which is located in the castle’s Great Hall, St Peter’s Chapel and Constable’s Lodgings. It is the only public museum in UK founded by a member of the Royal family.

Princess Beatrice established the museum in 1898 as a memorial to her husband, Prince Henry of Battenberg with the “earnest hope and desire” and with the “help and co-operation of others” to “form a full collection of objects of historical interest connected with the Island

Her aspiration is reflected in the extensive collection displayed and safeguarded by an independent Charitable Trust. The museum holds many important items that span the history of Isle of Wight since Roman times to the present. On your visit, you will note exhibits such as cross bow bolts from Tudor and medieval history, a small collection of personal items belonging to King Charles I and over 5000 paintings and prints reflecting the island’s topography and its people. There are exhibits of the Isle of Wight Rifles, reflecting the Island’s strong military connection during the wars. There are lots more on display such as the social history collection and the toy collection which are interesting also.

3 | Explore the Castle’s history

Delve deeper into the history of this well-preserved castle and experience how this stronghold had survived eight hundred years, resisting the French siege and the Spanish Armada. See where Charles I was imprisoned for fourteen months before his execution in 1649, and the room where he sought to escape from, he was found wedged in the bars of the window – the guards caught him!

4 | The Chapel of St Nicholas in Castro

St Nicholas Chapel | Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle
The Chapel of St Nicholas in Castro | Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight

St Nicholas Chapel is fairly recent, built in 1904 and located just next to the main gate. However, a long sequence of chapels dedicated to St Nicholas had been at the castle since medieval times.

The current chapel was built as a 250th anniversary memorial to Charles I and was redecorated in 1929. The altar painting was commissioned by Princess Beatrice, Queen Victoria youngest daughter, in memory of her youngest son who died at Ypres. The chapel is now the island’s main war memorial.

Take a moment and experience the beauty, serenity and the warmth of St Nicholas Chapel.

5 | Meet Carisbrooke Donkeys at the Well House

Don’t miss the Well House – meet the lovable resident donkeys at Carisbrooke Castle who have been drawing up water for the castle for hundreds of years! Their daily routine is to work the sixteenth century tread wheel to raise water from the bottom of the castle well at 49 metres (161 metres).

6 | Ancient Castle Keep and Wall Walk

Steps up to the Castle Keep | Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle
Very steep steps leading to the Castle Keep | Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle

Climb the very steep steps of the castle mound to the ancient castle keep which was constructed during the Norman times in 1100, when the island belonged to the Redvers family.

stunning views from the wall-walk.carisbrooke.castle | things to do at Carisbrooke Castle
stunning views from the wall-walk | Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle

Once up, you are rewarded with amazing views of the island and as far as your eyes can see. Follow the wall and the battlements – walk right around the castle, taking in the views from all directions.

7 | Edwardian Garden | Princess Beatrice Garden

Princess Beatrice Garden | Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle
Layout of Princess Beatrice Garden | Things to do at Carisbrooke Castle

Enjoy and be wooed by the beautiful and inspiring Edwardian garden which was created to reflect the original garden retreat of Princess Beatrice, Queen Victoria’s daughter who later, was the Governor of Isle of Wight. The seasonal planting, water features and orchard are indeed charming. According to the English Heritage site, the plants were chosen:

“to echo Princess Beatrice’s blue, red and gold heraldic crest, and the layout reflects architectural detail on the adjoining Chapel of St Nicholas”

The layout of the garden takes inspiration from Princess Beatrice’s original private walled garden and when viewed from the wall-walk, you could see the framework of the borders reflect the chapel windows.

beatrice.garden.english.heritage (2)
Princess Beatrice Garden | Image courtesy English Heritage

Outside of winter, spring brings forth the snowdrops, primrose and daffodils followed by cowslips and bluebells and the beautiful blossoms of the Judus tree plus so much more. Summer sees a riot of colours and exotic mix of cottage garden favourites while fall is the season to discover the unusual Mespelus germanica, fruits from which have been enjoyed since Roman times.

8 | Family fun

If you are visiting with kids, there are activities for children to participate where they can dress up as Norman warriors or as princesses.

English Heritage also run special events for school holidays and one of their most popular ones are the Easter Adventure Quest.

9 | Delightful Castle Tearoom

After exploring the castle and the grounds, treat yourself to a delicious light meal or snacks in the Castle’s Tearoom, located above the former carriage room. This delightful castle tearoom serves a selection of locally produced hot and cold food, including sandwiches, cakes, hot and cold beverages.

Practical information

Plan your visit

Visits must be pre-booked. Once you have decided when to visit, book your arrival time slot. Take along your booking confirmation on the day – note that the time shown is the earliest you can arrive.

Last admission is thirty minutes before the site closes, but really you will need at least half a day for a full immersive experience.

Admission

Admission price + Donation:

Adult > £9.38 | Concession > £8.48 | Child > £5.63 | Family > £24.38

*Family ticket is valid for 2 adults and up to 3 children

Carisbrooke Castle is managed by English Heritage, therefore English Heritage Members enjoy unlimited access to Carisbrooke Castle throughout their membership. The Membership is great value and you can take a look at the benefits it offers for one small contribution > English Heritage Membership benefits or you can become a Member now, using the link below.

Address: Castle Hill, Newport, Isle of Wight, PO30 1XY

Travel to the Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight is just a few miles on the south coast of England and is easily reached by ferries and catamaran.

Wightlink Ferries depart from Portsmouth to Fishbourne and takes around 45 minutes. There is another from Lymington to Yarmouth which is around 40 minutes journey. Both ferry journeys accommodate cars, motor homes, bikes and foot passengers. Wightlink also runs a high-speed Catamaran for foot passengers from Portsmouth to Ryde pier and this journey takes approximately 22 minutes.

Red Funnel departs from Southampton and travels to East Cowes and takes about 60 minutes. The ferry takes cars, motor homes, bikes and foot passengers. Red Funnel runs the Red Jet service for foot passengers from Southampton into Cowes and this journey takes around 25 minutes.

Getting around the Isle of Wight

The public transport in Isle of Wight is managed by Southern Vectis and is acknowledged as the best rural bus services in the country.

The train service is Island Line and is managed by South Western Railway. The service connects Ryde, Brading, Sandown, Lake and Shanklin. This is a convenient service to be picked up by foot passengers from Ryde pier.

Travelling to Southampton | Portsmouth | Lymington by train

Plan your journey ahead of time and take advantage of cheap tickets for your travel.

Read article: Trainline in UK

Places to stay near Carisbrooke Castle | Newport

67c The Mews | The Old Dairy, Gatcombe

Check Tripadvisor reviews >>

Where to eat

Fine Dining: Gem42 | Italian: Marenghi’s | British Bar, Pub: The Golden Lion

Check Tripadvisor reviews >>

On a final note on fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle

Carisbrooke Castle was one of our highlights when my family and I visited the Isle of Wight for 5 days. It was a great summer getaway and we cherish our many memories of the island. Sincerely hope you will get to experience Isle of Wight and Carisbrooke Castle if you haven’t already.

Georgina xx

FACTS ABOUT CARISBROOKE CASTLE, ISLE OF WIGHT:

50.6873° N, 1.3135° W

Owned: English Heritage

Access: Open to the public

Address: Castle Hill, Newport, Isle of Wight, PO30 1XY

Nearest town: Newport

History about Carisbrooke Castle:

A ruined wall suggests that there was a building here late Roman times but this has not been proved. The cousin of King Cynric of Wessex who died in 544 AD may have been buried here. The site may have been used as a pagan Anglo-Saxon cemetery in the sixth century – three graves were discovered here. It was a stronghold for the Anglo-Saxon during 8th century.

Later a defence wall was built around the hill to protect against the Vikings in 1000 AD.

From 1100 onwards, the castle was owned by the Redvers’ family and was sold to Edward I in 1293 by the last Redvers’ resident, Countess Isabella de Fortibus.

During the reign of Elizabeth I (Nov 1558 – 1603) the Castle was improved with stone walls, towers, keep and additional fortifications when the Spanish Armada was expected.

In 1649, Carisbrooke Castle became a prison for Charles I, and afterwards, his two children were confined to the castle as well, where his daughter Princess Elizabeth died.

From 1896 through to 1944, Carisbrooke Castle became a summer residence to Princess Beatrice, the youngest daughter of Queen Victoria, who also succeeded her husband, Prince Henry of Battenberg and became the Governor of the Isle of Wight.

References:

CJ Young, Excavations at Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight, 1921–1996, Wessex Archaeology Report 18 (Salisbury, 2000), 52–3, 86–97.

PG Stone, The Architectural Antiquities of the Isle of Wight, part II: The West Medine (London, 1891), 74–5

AD Saunders, ‘Hampshire coastal defences since the introduction of artillery’, Archaeological Journal, 123 (1967), 136–71.

JD Jones, The Royal Prisoner (London, 1965)

Visitors: 131,358 in 2019

Isle of Wight at a Glance

Coordinates: Latitude: 50° 40′ 30.59″ N Longitude: -1° 16′ 30.60″ W

Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight

Island: Largest island in England

Island’s city: Newport

Population: 141,538 | Second most populous island in England behind Portsea Island.

County: Governed by one unitary authority.

Time Zone: Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) | British Summer Time (BST)

Money

Currency: Pounds Sterling (£)

Credit and Debit cards accepted.

Topography

Landmass: The Isle is roughly 380.728 kilometer/147 square miles

Elevation: Maximum elevation: 242 m | Average elevation: 15 m | Minimum elevation: -1 m

Designation:

1 | Isle of Wight Biosphere Reserve, United Kingdom

2 | Isle of Wight – Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

Why Visit

Famous for: Ghosts, Dinosaur bones, Victorian villages + Healing & Wellbeing retreats

Number of Visitors surpass residents >

Travel Advice

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UK Foreign Travel Advice

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9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle Isle of Wight UK
9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle Isle of Wight UK
9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle Isle of Wight UK
9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle Isle of Wight UK

Unmissable 9 fun things to do at Carisbrooke Castle Isle of Wight first published at timelesstravelsteps.com and is regularly updated

Updated: July 6 2021

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English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass

English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass

English Heritage is a charity and is the guardian of over 400 historic buildings, gardens, monuments, medieval castles, forts and defences in England. They also conduct researches, support or carry out archaeological work and advise on what to do with a historic site. For the most part, English Heritage receive funding from the UK government, ultimately the UK tax payer but the costs of running, funding research and supporting excavations requires more. For this reason, the English Heritage charges its visitors a fee. This fee is levied on visitors from UK and visitors from abroad. To support the costs of visiting a site, English Heritage has several schemes.

For UK residents, English Heritage offer a membership scheme ranging from individual, joint, family and senior memberships. The English Heritage Membership is an excellent value for money scheme and you could navigate to read the complete guide on English Heritage Membership benefits . However, if you are not living in UK, the English Heritage Membership is not available to you. They do have a specially curated scheme for overseas residents visiting England on a vacation, What you need is the English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass that allows for exploring the ancient historic past of over 100 heritage sites. Here’s how it works…

English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass

The English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass is a convenient way to explore England’s favourite and most historic sites. The Overseas Visitors Pass is available to visitors on vacation and gives you the flexibility to get the most out of your trip. It is available to three groups of visitors – single adult, joint or two adults and family. You have two choices to select from:

  • 9 consecutive day pass; or
  • 16 consecutive day pass.

*Effective from day of first activation

What does the Overseas Visitors Pass cost?

The price of the Overseas Visitors Pass varies according to the group specified and the length of time you need it for. The following is what is advertised on the English Heritage site:

Prices for the English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass

Group9 days
£
16 days
£
1 x adult38.0045.00
2 x adults66.0076.00
Family75.0086.00
The Family Pass – 2 adults and 4 family members up to the age of 18 living at the same address as the adults

**Prices are valid from March 27 2021 to March 31 2022

Benefits of an English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass

The Overseas Visitors Pass is a simple way to explore some of England’s best and most treasured historic sites. These are:

Unlimited access

The Pass grants access to 100+ sites including the most popular places – Stonehenge, Dover Castle and Tintagel Castle. Visit as many times as you like within the duration of your Pass;

Free Guidebook

Along with the Overseas Visitors Pass, you will receive a Guidebook to the attractions and places you could visit with the Pass. To plan beforehand and as a guide, take a look at this map by the English Heritage for Overseas Visitors Pass.

Free or reduced entry to events

The Overseas Visitors Pass gives you access to special events such as jousts and re-enactments.

Flexibility

The Pass embeds great flexibility to suit your itinerary. Depending on your selection of either nine or sixteen days, it takes effect from first activation. You do not have to rush through your vacation, thereby rush through the sites. Plan ahead and dedicate the nine or sixteen days visiting all your must-see sites.

Value for money

With over a hundred places to visit, including Stonehenge, you could start saving almost immediately after visiting two or three sites. A simple illustration to give you an idea of how much you would save although the sites may not be a representative sample of visitors most visited.

A simple illustration of how much you would save with an Overseas Visitors Pass.

Heritage SitePrice per Adult £Price per child £Price per family – 2xadults + 3 kids £
Stonehenge21.5012.9055.90
Dover Castle18.7011.3048.70
1066 Battle of Hastings13.908.4036.20
Total price54.1032.60140.80
With Overseas Visitors Pass – 9 days 38.00FREE75.00
Savings made with Overseas Visitors Pass16.1032.6065.80
Adult: 18+ years | Child: 5-17 years | Family: 2xadults + up to 4 kids living in the same address | Prices include donations.

As can be seen, there are considerable savings to be made by visiting just three sites and you have a hundred left to explore! An incredible bargain – wouldn’t you agree?

Convenience

Buying an Overseas Visitors Pass could not be easier. You could do it online – just click the link below and complete the details or navigate via the English Heritage site.

Navigate via English Heritage site

Where and how to collect the English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass

Bring along your email confirmation, proof of overseas residency/address and the credit card used for the purchase to collect your English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass from any of the English Heritage staffed site.

On a final note…

Without a doubt, the Overseas Visitors Pass offer great value for money and is a flexible Pass that can be utilised to the max if planned well. Plan ahead and buy it conveniently online > English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass.

Whenever you choose to visit England, have a great time exploring and discovering England’s finest!

Georgina xx


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English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass
English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass
English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass
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An easy yet informative guide to saving money on the English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass when visiting our priceless heritage sites. | Save money on heritage sites UK | Visit England | via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/An easy yet informative guide to saving money on the English Heritage Overseas Visitors Pass when visiting our priceless heritage sites. | Save money on heritage sites UK | Visit England | via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

English Heritage Membership benefits

English Heritage Membership Benefits and more

English Heritage, formally known as English Heritage Trust is the popular entity that cares for England’s national collection of historic sites and monuments. To help keep the various ongoing programmes operational to a good standard for the benefit of current and future generation, the English Heritage charges visitors an entry fee at some of their historic sites. They also have valuable schemes to help with the costs so to encourage more visitors enjoy the remarkable heritage of England.

English Heritage Membership is a scheme that caters for different types of members – family, joint, individual and lifetime. In addition, English Heritage offer an Overseas Visitor Pass which is great value for money option if you are visiting England for more than nine days. More details on all of these below.

About English Heritage in a nutshell

English Heritage is a non-governmental entity, that became a self-financing charity in 2015.

According to English Heritage website, they are the guardian of over 400 historic buildings, monuments and sites – from world-famous prehistoric sites to grand medieval castles, from Roman forts on the edges of the empire to a Cold War bunker”. Their purpose is to “bring the story of England to life for over 10 million people each year – They curate activities for people to experience history in an engaging way and offer hands on experiences to inspire imagination and authenticity in their young visitors for whose interests these historic sites are protected. Going forward, English Heritage is committed to Inspiration, Conservation, Involvement and Financial Sustainability.”

In addition, English Heritage also educate, commission research, advise all sorts of people and bodies on England’s heritage, from the government to individuals who own listed buildings. Undoubtedly all of these costs money.

Hadrian's Wall | English Heritage membership
Hadrian’s Wall | England

As a charity, a substantial amount of its running costs is met by the UK government, ultimately the British taxpayer. To supplement this support, English Heritage charges an entry fee for some of its properties. The entry fee varies, from under ten pounds to up to twenty pounds per person. The good news is that entry to over two hundred fifty properties are free including Maiden Castle, Dorset, St Katherine’s Oratory, Isle of Wight and Hadrian’s Wall, the most celebrated Roman monument in Britain built in 122 AD.

Stonehenge - The Stone Circle | English Heritage Membership benefits
Stonehenge – The Stone Circle | England

However, if you wish to visit some of the most intriguing and interesting sites that pull the most visitors such as Stonehenge, Dover Castle, Osborne House, and Bolsover Castle, the entry fee will quickly add up! Whether you live in England and visit English Heritage properties as a favourite past time or you are visiting the country from overseas, the costs of visiting the must-see historical sites will add up. Even if you decide to spread it across the year or the duration of your vacation and pay as and when you visit, it will take you well over sixty pounds per individual quite easily.

To help with the costs, and to encourage more visitors to embrace majestic castles, the archaeological and historic sites in England, English Heritage run two main schemesEnglish Heritage Membership mainly targeted to residents of UK and the Overseas Visitors Pass for visitors on a short-term vacation.

English Heritage Membership

English Heritage Membership provides for various groups of visitors. Currently the scheme caters for four main groups with sub-categoriesFamily, Joint, Individual and Lifetime. All membership schemes lasts a year. You could buy a membership for yourself or buy as a gift for another.

English Heritage Membership for Family

Family memberships are available for either one adult with children or two adults with children.

Membership costs:

One adult + up to six children >> £64.00 a year
Two adults + up to twelve children >> £111.00 a year
*Adult members must live at the same address

English Heritage Joint Membership

Joint memberships are available in three categories:

Membership costs

Two adults >> £111.00 a year
One adult + one senior >> £99.00 a year
Joint Senior >> £87.00 a year
*Adults must be 18+ | Senior must be 65+ | Adult members must live in the same address

English Heritage Individual Membership

English Heritage individual membership cater for three categories of people:

Membership costs

Individual adult >> £64.00 a year
Individual Senior >> £57.00 a year
Young adult/student >> £51.00 a year
Adult 18+ | Senior-65+ | Young adult/student-18 to 25 + valid NUS card

English Heritage Lifetime Membership

The Life Membership is offered to four categories:

Membership costs:

Individual adult (18+ years) >> £1490.00
Senior (65+ years) >> £1170.00
Joint adult (both 18+ years) >> £2130.00
Joint Senior (both 65+ years) >> £1560.00
Adult members must live at the same address

**All prices are correct at time of writing, March 2021. Prices includes donations.

As the membership scheme is available to a wide range of people and appears reasonably priced, there may still be questions asked and debated about.

Is the English Heritage Membership value for money

One of the many questions people debate about before joining a membership scheme, any membership scheme for that matter, is whether it is a value for money scheme. In other words, does the benefits outweigh its costs? In short, a membership scheme is value for money if it is used correctly. While joining the English Heritage membership provides for considerable savings to be made, the membership comes with so much more than just savings.

As an example, below is an illustration of the savings a family, would make in a year if they were to visit the following five of the most popular of English Heritage sites, including Stonehenge which is one of the most popular heritage site in UK for both residents and tourists alike.

Stonehenge, Wiltshire | Dover Castle, Kent | Kenilworth Castle, Warwickshire | Whitby Abbey, North Yorkshire | 1066 Battle of Hastings, Abbey and Battlefield, East Sussex

This may not be a representative sample of the top five sites that people would visit but it does give an idea of how much savings a family (2+3 kids) could make with a membership.

Heritage SitePrice per adult £Price per child £Family (2 adults + 3 kids)
£
Stonehenge21.5012.9055.90
Dover Castle18.7011.3048.70
Kenilworth Castle13.908.4036.20
Whitby Abbey11.006.6028.60
1066 Battle of Hastings13.908.4036.20
Total price per adult/child/family79.0047.60205.60
Total price per family – 2 adults and up to 12 kids | Annual membership = £111.00 )FREEFREEFREE
Family = 2 adults + 3 kids | Adult (18+ years) | Child (5-17 years)

**All prices are correct at time of writing, March 2021

Taking this example a little further for individual visits, you would still make savings out of an annual membership which is currently at £64.00. The table does not give a comparison for seniors, students and visitors but it does give a good idea of savings you would make if you had an English Heritage membership. Circling back to whether this membership is value for money – without a doubt it is provided you utilise it by visiting the heritage sites sprinkled around England in an annual period.

As necessary as it may be to make savings, English Heritage Membership benefits does not end with just free entry to over 400 properties in England. There is more.

English Heritage Membership Benefits

English Heritage membership benefits
Audley End House and Gardens, Essex, East of England

With an annual English Heritage Membership, you will enjoy the following benefits:

Free access to over 400 historical sites.

During the annual period, a member has free access to all 400 and more of English Heritage sites and can visit a site multiple times as you may wish. English Heritage properties includes castles, gardens, forts, defences, prehistoric sites, historic houses and abbeys. You could find a place to visit here.

Kids go free with an accompanying adult.

As you can see from the table above, up to six children get free entry to a site. There are events specially curated for kids during school term holidays and summer vacation that create imagination, responsibility and fun which are invaluable experiences for children.

Free or reduced entry to hundreds of events throughout the year.

Many of the English Heritage sites run varied programmes throughout the year for visitors. Members enjoy reduced entry fee or no fee at all to these events.

Free or reduced entry to other attractions in UK.

Members also get reduced price entry to heritage sites in Wales, Scotland and Ireland.

Membership Pack.

The membership pack contains your membership card along with a Members’ Handbook, Members’ Magazine, Information on Members’ Events and Members’ Rewards.

Members’ Handbook + Members’ Magazine

The complimentary Member’s Handbook worth £10.95 helps you plan inspiring days out and pre-book events before the general public. The Members Magazine is delivered four times a year with more colourful pictures and inspiring events to get involved in.

Members’ Rewards Scheme

The Members’ Rewards scheme offers members to take advantage of money- saving offers and deals from over 60 of English Heritage partners.

Simple pleasures of being part of English Heritage community

Besides getting great value on the very many English Heritage properties and the heritage sites in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland where there are free or reduced entry costs, the benefits of joining the English Heritage membership allow for all sorts of simple pleasures.

Remember that your membership fee goes to a great cause – the protection of England’s most precious, and amazing of historic sites. You can see, enjoy and delve deeper into the discovery as well as the painstaking research that goes into preserving the monuments that represent English history as and when you are able to. In addition, your contribution goes towards preserving the historic sites for future generation – nothing quite beats the rhythm of history or standing on the very spot where historic events took place

The Members’ Magazine sets out forthcoming events where you can plan ahead of time and the Members’ Reward scheme is a great way to spoil oneself with something special for example a weekend getaway.

While the English Heritage Membership benefits are enjoyed by UK residents, visitors to UK may also enjoy the benefits of exploring the ancient historic past via a dedicated scheme – Overseas Visitor Pass.

English Heritage and Overseas Visitors Pass

Visitors to UK can enjoy free entry to over 100 heritage sites with an Overseas Visitor Pass. Briefly, the Overseas Visitor Pass is a scheme available to overseas residents who are visiting England for a specific time. The Pass is valid for a duration of 9 or 16 days from first activation and includes free entry to popular English Heritage sites such as Stonehenge and Dover Castle. For convenience, the benefits and the prices of the Overseas Visitor Pass scheme is dealt with in another article. To learn more about the great value for money scheme available to overseas visitors, navigate to Overseas Visitors Pass.

On a final note…

On a final note – the English Heritage membership is a great value for money scheme provided the benefits are utilised. However, if circumstances are such that you are not able to visit sites to cover the initial outlay, cherish the idea that your contribution goes to a good cause which benefits future generation.

Joining the English Heritage Membership scheme could not be easier. Whether you are signing up for yourself or buying the English Heritage membership as a gift, you could do so easily online with a couple of clicks. Click the graphic below and join today.

Take advantage of our Exclusive Readership Offer – Get 15% Off Gift and Annual Membership >> Use Code EH2021 at checkout throughout April 2021. Code can only be used for Membership purchases. Expires 30th April 2021.

English Heritage has begun to welcoming visitors. You can book tickets to visit 60+ sites at the moment while more sites will open in phases in the coming months. Visits must be booked in advance. Learn more on which sites are open and how to book your visit.

Have a splendid time exploring the precious and timeless monuments of English Heritage.

Georgina xx

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A complete guide to English Heritage Membership benefits with one flat fee | Stonehenge | Dover Castle | Audley End House | Whitby Abbey | 1066 Battle of Hastings, Abbey and Battlefield via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/A complete guide to English Heritage Membership benefits with one flat fee | Stonehenge | Dover Castle | Audley End House | Whitby Abbey | 1066 Battle of Hastings, Abbey and Battlefield via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

Ghosts of Blickling Hall Norfolk

Ghosts of Blickling Hall Norfolk

A stately home, Blickling Hall forms part of the Blickling Estate in the village of Blickling, in Norfolk. The current Jacobean house, Blickling Hall was built on the ruins of a manor house, former home of the Boleyns and birth place of Anne Boleyn. Cared for by the National Trust since 1940, Blickling Hall is a popular destination throughout the year. It is more popular around May 19 each year as visitors try to get glimpses at the ghosts of Blickling Hall.

Anne Boleyn: Biography

Born: c1501 | Blickling Castle, Norfolk

Died: May 19 1536, Tower Green, Tower of London | Executed

Reigned: June 1533 – May 1536

Coronation: June 1 1533

Parents: Sir Thomas Boleyn and his wife, Elizabeth Howard, daughter of Duke of Norfolk

Spouse: Henry VIII

Children: Elizabeth I

Succeeded by: Jane Seymour, Henry VIII’s third wife

Ghosts of Blickling Hall Norfolk

Blickling Hall is said to be haunted by Britain’s most famous ghost – Anne Boleyn. Each year on the anniversary of her execution, May 19, she is reportedly seen arriving by coach drawn by headless horseman and four headless horses. Dressed in all white, she carries her severed head and glides the rooms and corridors until daybreak.

Sightings of Anne and the carriage have been frequent and reported by witnesses giving it some degree of credibility. In 1979, an apparition, supposedly of Anne was sighted in the library.

Another reported sighting of a ghostly inhabitant of Bickling Hall is Thomas Boleyn, Anne’s father. Thomas Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire was an ambitious man who engineered the marriage of his daughter, Anne Boleyn to King Henry VIII. He also betrayed Anne and his son George at the trial of Anne to save himself. Anne and George were executed. Folklore has it that for his wrong doings and as penance, he is required to cross a dozen bridges before cockcrows for a thousand years. His route is from Blickling>Aylsham>Burg>Buxton Coltishall>Meyton>Oxnead and finally to Wroxham.

Thomas Boleyn is reportedly seen carrying his severed head under his arms, and gushing flame from his mouth. (There is a flaw in this tale, as Thomas Boleyn died in his bed, with his head intact!)

Headless apparitions of the Boleyns are not the only ghosts of Blickling Hall. This magnificent mansion is said to be haunted by Sir John Fastolfe, the fifteenth century knight. He is seen throughout the building.

A ‘Grey Lady’ has also been reportedly seen floating through walls.

A little background to Blickling Estate, Norfolk

Ghosts of Blickling Hall Norfolk
Blickling Hall, Norfolk | Wikimedia

Blickling Estate was originally owned by Sir John Fastolf of Caister between 1380 and 1459. He made a fortune during the Hundred Years’ War. His coat of arms is still on display here.

Later, the property became home to the Boleyns, Thomas Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire and his wife, Elizabeth Howard, daughter to Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey between 1499 and 1505. Three of their surviving children were born at Blickling – Mary, Anne and George.

Blickling Estate was purchased by Sir Henry Hobart, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas and 1st Baronet from Robert Clere in 1616. He commissioned Robert Lyminge, the architect to design the current Jacobean structure. The Blickling Hall seen today was built on the ruins of the manor house owned by the Boleyns.

The property stayed in the Hobart’s family until it was passed down to William Kerr, the 8th Marquess of Lothian.

During the Second World War, the house was requisitioned and served as the Officers Mess of the RAF Oulton. Afterwards, the house and the entire Blickling Estate was passed to the National Trust.

The house was de-requisitioned after the war and the National Trust rented it out to tenants until 1960. The Trust began working on the property to restore it to its historical style and beauty. The house, Blickling Hall, Gardens and Park was opened to the public in 1962 and has continued to be cared for by the National Trust and remains open the same to this day.

How to visit Blickling Hall, Blickling Estate, Norfolk

blickling.estate.nationaltrust | Ghosts of Blickling Hall Norfolk
Blickling Estate | National Trust

Blickling Hall, Gardens and Parkland that forms Blickling Estate is cared for by the National Trust. It is said that one day at the Estate is never enough! Nevertheless, if one day is all you have, then a visit will not disappoint as the Blickling Estate has something for everyone.

The Gardens and Park are open throughout all seasons but to avoid disappointment, ensure to pre-book your visit.

Plan your visit to Blickling Estate

How to get to Blickling Estate

Blickling Estate is located at the following address:

Blickling, Norwich, Norfolk, NR11 6NF

By Train

Aylsham (Bure Valley Railway from Hoveton and Wroxham) 2.8 km (1.75 miles) | North Walsham – 13 km (8 miles)

Buy your train tickets from Trainline UK, one of the best, popular and reliable suppliers of train tickets to passengers.

By Bus

Services from Norwich to Holt and Sheringham, alight at Aylsham, then 2.8 km (1.5 miles)

By Road

NW of Aylsham on B1354, signposted off A140 Norwich/Cromer – 2.4 km (1.5 miles)

Book places to stay near Blickling Estate

Rated as Excellent by visitors, Sankence Lodge is located 4.4 km from Blickling Hall. Managed by a private host, the property boasts garden views, free WiFi and parking

Peruse further and book your stay here

Peruse further on some carefully selected accommodation options in Aylsham, Norfolk to suit your style by navigating to this page.


If you have enjoyed reading this post on Ghosts of Blickling Hall, you may also like to learn a more on the history of Britain and wider UK. Here are some suggestions for you:

Magnificent Hever Castle | Childhood home of Anne Boleyn


I sincerely hope that this page is valuable to you in planning your visit to Blickling Hall? If so, do let me know in comments below. I would love to hear from you.

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Blickling Hall, popular throughout the year and more so around May 19 each year as visitors try to get glimpses at the ghosts of Blickling Hall via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/Blickling Hall, popular throughout the year and more so around May 19 each year as visitors try to get glimpses at the ghosts of Blickling Hall via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

5 Rewarding ways to experience St Paul’s Cathedral London

5 Rewarding ways to experience St Paul’s Cathedral London

A landmark of London, St Paul’s Cathedral is one of the most visited attraction and it never fails to leave visitors in awe. There are many rewarding ways to experience St Paul’s Cathedral London from a stand alone entry ticket with full access to all floors to private guided tours so you get to know of its history from a knowledgeable source. However, for great value for money tours, you could always combine a visit to St Paul’s Cathedral with a visit to other landmarks in London. In addition, you could purchase London Pass over several days so you could explore London at your own pace.

Whichever way you choose to learn more of St Paul’s Cathedral, the following 5 rewarding ways to experience St Paul’s Cathedral have been carefully selected to enhance and add value to your visit.

Entry ticket to St Paul’s Cathedral

5 rewarding ways to experience St Pauls Cathedral | A glimpse of the interior of St Paul's Cathedral. The nave where the choir sits on both sides.
A glimpse of the interior of St Paul’s Cathedral. The nave where the choir sits on both sides | Image: georgina_daniel

Enjoy this famous landmark of London with a discounted entry ticket. This ticket gives you access to the Cathedral floor and its crypt, its three galleries, affording you panoramic views over London.

This option is suitable for visitors who wish to explore this beautiful Cathedral at their own pace. Nevertheless, 2 to 3 hours is recommended for a rewarding and immersive experience.

Buy entry ticket to St Paul’s Cathedral from Get Your Guide here

Combining St Paul’s Cathedral with other attractions in London

1 | Explore London on foot

Explore the City on foot and learn of London’s history. See 30 of London’s landmarks including the 1400 year old St Paul’s Cathedral.

This walking tour begins in Green Park, London and will take you through about 30 landmarks in London including:

Buckingham Palace | Trafalgar Square | Big Ben | Downing Street | Westminster Abbey | Whitehall | Houses of Parliament | London Eye | Shakespeare’s Globe Theater | London Bridge | Southwark Cathedral | The Shard | HMS Belfast | Square Mile | Tower Bridge | Tower of London

Your final stop is St Paul’s Cathedral where your guide will leave you to explore the Cathedral at your own pace. Entry to St Paul’s is included in this tour price

This tour takes approximately 6 hours and requires good footwear.

2 | St Paul’s Cathedral + London Eye + Tower of London + Thames River Cruise

Join this full day tour of London city which will take you on a historic journey of London – from Tower of London, Greenwich and St Paul’s Cathedral. Marvel at the magnificent Crown Jewels at the Tower, explore Greenwich on foot, enjoy the marvelous panoramic views over the city from the iconic London Eye. As well, learn more of London while on a cruise of the famous River Thames.

This tour includes admission to the Tower of London and St Paul’s Cathedral. As always, when on a London tour, wear appropriate footwear.

3 | Westminster + St Paul’s Cathedral Walking tour

This comprehensive walking tour takes you through the popular area of Westminster in London. Learn much from your knowledgeable guide before arriving at St Paul’s Cathedral where the tour guide leaves you to explore the Cathedral at your own pace.

Entry to St Paul’s Cathedral is included in this tour and is provided by our Trusted Partner, Viator, a Tripadvisor company.

4 | Enjoy London on a London hop-on hop-off bus tour

Design an itinerary on London and explore the city at your own pace with one of these great value for money hop-on hop-off bus experiences. Hop-on and hop-off as much as you like between six different bus routes for the duration of your ticket and explore on foot with free walking tours. See Buckingham Palace, Westminster, Piccadilly Circus, London Eye, Tower of London, and much more with this offer. This offer is subject to T & Cs as it depends very much on whether your purchase is for 24, 48 or 72 hours.

5 | Enjoy London with over 80+ attractions with The London Pass

Access over 80 attractions and one day of hop-on hop-off bus tour with this highly recommended discounted London Pass. Valid for the selected duration of 1 to 10 days (from first activation), the London Pass comes with a guide book packed with helpful tips, and maps, making this selection one of the many rewarding ways to experience St Paul’s Cathedral London.

For more experiences in and around London + UK – view the following posts

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St Paul's Cathedral is one of the most visited attraction and it never fails to leave visitors in awe. Here are 5 rewarding ways to experience St Paul's Cathedral London via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/St Paul's Cathedral is one of the most visited attraction and it never fails to leave visitors in awe. Here are 5 rewarding ways to experience St Paul's Cathedral London via @GGeorgina_timelesstravelsteps/

The Boleyn Family | Who were they and What happened to them after Anne’s death

The Boleyn Family

The Boleyn family was one of the most respected and prominent family in English aristocracy. They reached the peak of their influence during Tudor rule when Anne Boleyn, the daughter to Thomas Boleyn and Elizabeth Howard became the second wife, Queen consort to King Henry VIII in 1533. Then in 1536, an incomprehensible tragedy fell upon them. The Boleyn family were almost destroyed! Two members of the family had their lives put to death and three fundamentally damaged.

This is their story.

This article on the Boleyn Family forms part of a series of articles on the History of Britain as an easy read on Sundays

The Boleyn Family

In 1536, on the morning of May 19, a young courageous woman, dressed in a black robe and a white ermine trim was taken to the scaffold in Tower Green that was specially built for her. She was mercilessly executed by a single swipe of a sword by a skilled French swordsman on charges of adultery, incest, treason and witchcraft. She was not even given a coffin. She was wrapped in a white cloth, placed in an old elm chest, and buried at the Tower Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula.

This woman was Anne Boleyn.

Anne Boleyn

“Anna Bollein Queen” by Hans Holbein

Anne Boleyn was one of the three surviving children of Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, and 1st Earl of Ormonde and Elizabeth Howard, daughter of Thomas Howard, the 2nd Duke of Norfolk. Her siblings were Mary, older to Anne and George, her younger brother. Anne is said to be an intelligent, witty, proud and a principled individual.

Anne Boleyn | Early years and Education

Anne spent her early years at Hever Castle, the Boleyns family home before she went to Netherlands and France. Anne received good education, typical for woman of her status. She spoke French fluently and she dressed well, bringing French fashion to the English court. She also learnt music, dance and singing along with archery, horseback riding and hunting.

Anne Boleyn | Marriage

Anne Boleyn married King Henry VIII officially on June 1 1933 in an elaborate ceremony followed by a banquet and became queen consort. She was pregnant at that time and gave birth to Elizabeth on September 7 1533. Elizabeth would later inherit the throne and become Queen Elizabeth I. However, Henry desperately wanted a male heir, and he soon fell for Jane Seymour, Anne’s cousin.

Anne Boleyn | Charges, Trial and Execution

In May of 1536, Anne was arrested, charged with incest, adultery with four men, treason and witchcraft. She was taken to the Tower of London to await her trial. The charges were instigated by her former friend, Thomas Cromwell. These charges sat well with the King also as he wanted to be rid of Anne as well. Anne was found guilty on all counts at a trial held on May 15 1536.

Read the full story here – Anne Boleyn | The most magnificent of Tudor Queens.

Thomas Boleyn | 1st Earl of Wiltshire, 1st Earl of Ormonde (1477-1539)

Thomas Boleyn | Wikidata

Thomas Boleyn was an English nobleman, a diplomat and a politician. He was made Knight of the Garter in 1523, Viscount Rochford in 1525 and Earl of Wiltshire and Earl of Ormond in 1529. Father to Anne Boleyn (r. 1533-1536) and maternal grandfather to Queen Elizabeth I (r. 1558-1603).

Born in 1477 at Blickling Manor in Norfolk, Thomas Boleyn was the son of Sir William Boleyn (1451-1505) of Blickling and Lady Margaret Butler (1454-1539), daughter of Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond.

Blickling was owned by Sir William’s father, Sir Geoffrey Boleyn a wealthy London merchant who served as Lord Mayor of London. He purchased the manor of Blickling, Norfolk in 1452 from Sir John Fastolf. He also came to own Hever Castle in Kent in 1462.

Thomas Boleyn | Career and Marriage

Thomas was an ambitious man who was a successful diplomat and courtier. He was active in the court of Henry VII and in 1503, he escorted Princess Margaret Tudor to Scotland to marry King James IV.

He married Lady Elizabeth Howard, eldest daughter of Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, and they had three surviving children:

Mary Boleyn (c.1499 – July 19 1543)

Anne Boleyn (c.1501 – May 19 1536)

George Boleyn, Viscount Rochford (c.1504 – 17 May 1536).

Thomas Boleyn was said to be a loving father, who had grand ambitions for his children. He ensured each received excellent education, both languages and skills, while he continued to build his reputation at court. While he was an ambassador to the Netherlands, he secured a position for his daughter, Anne at the court of the Archduchess Margaret of Austria.

Later, in 1514, he secured a position for both his daughters to accompany Princess Mary, Henry VIII’s sister to France for her marriage to 52 year old King Louis XII.

Thomas Boleyn | What happened after Anne’s Execution

After the execution of his children, Anne and George in 1536, he was stripped of his titles and removed from royal favour. However, it is said that he was soon back in favour in the royal court. He was active in squashing the rebellion of the Pilgrimage of Grace in 1536. He was invited to Edward VI’s christening in October 1537. By 1538, he was rumoured to marry Margaret Douglas, niece to Henry VIII. When he died, Henry VIII ordered masses to be said for his soul, clear evidence that Thomas Boleyn was back in favour.

Thomas Boleyn | Final days

Before his death, Thomas Boleyn appears to have taken steps to reconcile with his only surviving daughter, Mary Boleyn. He allowed Mary and her husband to live in Rochford Hall in Essex, and upon his death, he left the Rochford estate to Mary.

Thomas Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire died on March 12 1539 at Hever Castle – just under three years after the death of his daughter, Anne and his son, George.

An elaborate memorial brass to Sir Thomas Boleyn at St Peter’s Church, Hever | Photo: Free stock images.

He was laid to rest at St Peter’s Church, Hever. Topped with an elaborate memorial brass depicting Thomas dressed in robe and insignia of a Knight of the Garter, a badge on his left breast and a garter around his left knee. The inscription on his tomb reads:

“Here lieth Sir Thomas Bullen, Knight of the Order of the Garter, Erle of Wilscher and Erle or Ormunde, which deceased the 12th dai of Marche in the iere of our Lorde 1538”

His tomb still survives today.

Note: the date of death is 1538 because the Tudor calendar started on March 25, and not January 1.

If you visit Hever, visit also Hever Castle, home to the Boleyn family, childhood home of Anne Boleyn, and St Peter’s Church.

St Peter’s Church dates back to 12th century and is open daily throughout the year. Worship has been held here for over 875 years with Sunday services said in Traditional Language.

St Peter’s Church is located next to Hever Castle, in the heart of Hever, Kent.

Elizabeth Howard Boleyn, Countess of Wiltshire (1486-1538)

Believed to be Elizabeth Howard Boleyn

Elizabeth Boleyn, Countess of Wiltshire was an English noblewoman, born in Arundel Castle, Sussex, the eldest daughter to Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk and his first wife, Elizabeth Tilney. She was a direct descendant of King Edward I of England. Mother to Mary, Anne, George and maternal grandmother to Queen Elizabeth I. She is said to be of proud and ambitious in character.

Elizabeth Howard Boleyn | Relationship with her children

Not much is known of Elizabeth Boleyn except that she was a lady-in-waiting to Elizabeth of York, the mother of King Henry VIII. When Henry VIII was crowned King of England, she was again appointed lady-in-waiting to his queen, Catherine of Aragon.

Elizabeth Boleyn’s relationship with her daughter Mary, was a strained one, probably because of Mary’s unchaste behaviour. In contrast, her relationship with daughter Anne, is said to be a positive one. They shared a special bond and Elizabeth took an interest in Anne’s early education when they were at Hever Castle. Anne was taught music, singing, and dancing. Anne also became an expert at embroidery and enjoyed poetry under her mother’s guidance.

Elizabeth was a regular at court and acted as a chaperone to Anne and Henry during their courtship. She was present at her daughter’s coronation ceremony in 1533 and possibly rode in the first carriage with the Dowager Duchess, Anne’s step-grandmother (Ives, p. 177).

When Anne was taken to the Tower of London to await her trial, she was heard to exclaim, “Oh, my mother, thou wilt die with sorrow” (Weir, p. 317-319).

After the execution of her children, Anne and George, on charges of incest and treason, Elizabeth and her husband retired to Hever Castle.

Elizabeth Howard Boleyn | Her final days

Elizabeth died on April 3 1538. She is said to have suffered from a cough and cold, but it is believed she died of a broken heart. After Mary Boleyn’s disgrace and banishment from court, losing her children, Anne and George by execution for treason and incest, her husband striped off of his titles, it is more likely that she may have died of a broken heart. She died in a property near Baynard’s Castle, home to the Abbot of Reading. She was buried in the Howard aisle of St Mary’s Church, Lambeth on April 7 1538.

St Mary’s Church located next to Lambeth Palace, was decommissioned in 1972. It is now called the Garden Museum which re-opened in 2017.

The Garden Museum dates from the medieval era to present day. The Garden Museum was founded by Rosemary and John Nicholson in 1977 in order to rescue the abandoned church of St Mary’s at Lambeth, which was due for demolition. The church is the burial place of John Tradescant (c1570 – 1638), the first great gardener and plant-hunter in British history. His magnificent and enigmatic tomb is the centre-piece of the Sackler Garden, designed to reflect Tradescant’s life and spirit.

Garden Museum

Address: 5 Lambeth Palace Rd, South Bank, London SE1 7LB

Elizabeth’s grave is not visible. It is under the wooden floor of the museum gift shop. The exact location is uncertain also as the memorial brass which marked the spot is now lost.

Mary Boleyn | Lady Mary Boleyn (c.1499-1543)

Mary Boleyn

Mary Boleyn was the older sister to Anne Boleyn, King Henry VIII Queen consort.

Mary Boleyn | Education and Career

She was likely to have been educated alongside her sister, Anne and her brother, George at Hever Castle, Kent and given the education essential for young ladies of her rank and status. She was accomplished in dancing, embroidery, etiquette, household management, music, needlework, and singing along with games of chess, archery, falconry, riding and hunting.

Mary remained in England for most of her childhood. Her first trip abroad was in 1514 when she accompanied Princess Mary to France who was marrying King Louis XII. When King Louis XII died just three days after being married, most of the Queen’s maids were sent away but Mary remained.

Mary is said to have had an affair with King Francis I of France for some period between 1515 and 1519. She returned to England thereafter and was appointed lady-in-waiting to Catherine of Aragon, queen consort to Henry VIII.

She was one of Henry’s mistresses for a period of time before Henry fell in love with her sister, Anne.

Mary Boleyn | Marriage and Children

As a way to concealing Mary’s affair with King Henry VIII, and her shameful banishment from France’s court, she was married off to William Carey, a gentleman of the Privy Chamber. Mary and William had a son, Henry Carey. However, William sadly contracted the ‘sweating disease’ and died, leaving Mary with considerable debt. Henry VIII granted Anne Boleyn ward-ship of her nephew, whom she ensured was educated at a Catholic monastery. Anne also ensured that Mary received an annual pension.

In 1534, Mary secretly married William Stafford, a soldier, a status considered to be far below her own. When her marriage was discovered, her family disowned her and was also banished from the royal court. Her financial circumstances became desperate but is reported she admittedly saying:

“I had rather beg my bread with him than to be the greatest queen in Christendom. And I believe verily…he would not forsake me to be a king”

Anne stepped in to help her with some money but did not reinstate her to the court. This seems to be the closest they came to reconciling after Mary’s exile from the king’s court. There are no records of Mary between 1534 and Anne’s execution in 1536, or any records of visits with her parents or her siblings when they were imprisoned.

Mary and her father, Thomas Boleyn reconciled to some extent before he passed. Mary inherited the Rochford Hall and the Rochford Estate in Essex. .

Mary Boleyn is recorded to have four children, two carrying the name Carey and two by her second marriage, Stafford.

Catherine Carey (1524-1569) was lady-in-waiting to Anne of Cleves and Catherine Howard. Married Sir Francis Knollys, Knight of the Garter in 1540. She became lady of bedchamber to her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I. Her daughter, Lettice Knollys, was second wife to Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I.

Henry Carey 1st Baron Hunsdon (1526-1596), Knight of the Garter. Married to Anne Morgan and they had sixteen children. Anne Morgan was appointed to the office of Keeper of Somerset House, by Queen Elizabeth I of England.

Edward Stafford (1535-1545)

Anne Stafford (1536-unknown)

It was rumoured that Catherine Carey and Henry Carey were Henry VIII children, but there is no evidence to suggest that the King was the biological father.

Mary Boleyn Stafford | Final days

Mary Boleyn Stafford died of unknown causes on either on July 19 or July 30 1543 – the exact date is unknown. She is known to have spent her last days at Rochford Hall. However, her final resting place is unknown and remains a mystery.

George Boleyn | 2nd Viscount Rochford (c.1503-May 17 1536)

Possibly George Boleyn | Wikidata

An English nobleman and courtier, he played a prominent role in politics in the early 1530s. He is said to be intelligent, persuasive, proud and arrogant in character. He was accused of incest with his sister, Anne Boleyn, queen consort of Henry VIII. He was beheaded on May 17 1536.

Only son of Thomas Boleyn and his wife, Elizabeth Howard Boleyn, George Boleyn was born in Blickling Hall circa 1503. His first couple of years was spent at Blickling estate, but the Boleyn family moved to Hever Castle, Kent in 1505 when Thomas Boleyn inherited the castle from his father, Sir William Boleyn.

George Boleyn | Education, Career Marriage

George received excellent education